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Old 02-06-2019, 02:56 PM
 
142 posts, read 33,635 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mouldy old schmo View Post
is the term “mulatto” considered insulting now in south america?
no
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Old 02-06-2019, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
9,518 posts, read 9,399,709 times
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How many black people are in this video - one or two?
How many white people are in this video - one or two?
Or is there one black, one white, and one multiracial person?

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AvXv3eSUXEc
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Old 02-06-2019, 03:02 PM
AFP
 
6,898 posts, read 4,229,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
How many black people are in this video - one or two?
How many white people are in this video - one or two?
Or is there one black, one white, and one multiracial person?

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AvXv3eSUXEc
Option 3 the woman rolling the cigar isn't black or white she's mixed.
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Old 02-07-2019, 01:42 AM
 
Location: Caribbean
7,554 posts, read 2,425,094 times
Reputation: 2738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
How many black people are in this video - one or two?
How many white people are in this video - one or two?
Or is there one black, one white, and one multiracial person?

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=AvXv3eSUXEc
It appears to be the 3rd but, honestly, it’s best to ask people.
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Old 02-07-2019, 07:25 AM
 
142 posts, read 33,635 times
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PEOPLE have to understand something Puerto ricans, Cubans, Venezuelans, Dominicans do not reject their white heritage, why would they? most of their white heritage is mostly Canarian, andalusian, Galicia, not conquistadors but poor farmers who where promised land in the colonies. they dont hate the canarians, those are their brothers. They have a very similar culture and even their accent is the same. Slavery was abolished in DR and Venezuela very early (Slavery was abolished in DR in 1794) way way earlier than in the English speaking Caribbean or the US. for Dominicans Slavery is not the most traumatic experience they have suffered as a nation, Dictatorships and civil wars are. They dont put race at the center of their political history as in the US. Another thing is this, int he specific case of DR, most of the current population of DR is descendants of recent immigrants, when DR got its independence from Haiti in 1844, the country only had 75k people. Since then Rd has received a great amount of immigration from Haiti, Antigua and the English Caribbean, Puerto ricans, Cubans, Lebanese, Chinese, and now Venezuelans.

Last edited by Snapshoot; 02-07-2019 at 07:35 AM..
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Old 02-07-2019, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Caribbean
7,554 posts, read 2,425,094 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snapshoot View Post
PEOPLE have to understand something Puerto ricans, Cubans, Venezuelans, Dominicans do not reject their white heritage, why would they? most of their white heritage is mostly Canarian, andalusian, Galicia, not conquistadors but poor farmers who where promised land in the colonies. they dont hate the canarians, those are their brothers. They have a very similar culture and even their accent is the same. Slavery was abolished in DR and Venezuela very early (Slavery was abolished in DR in 1794) way way earlier than in the English speaking Caribbean or the US. for Dominicans Slavery is not the most traumatic experience they have suffered as a nation, Dictatorships and civil wars are. They dont put race at the center of their political history as in the US. Another thing is this, int he specific case of DR, most of the current population of DR is descendants of recent immigrants, when DR got its independence from Haiti in 1844, the country only had 75k people. Since then Rd has received a great amount of immigration from Haiti, Antigua and the English Caribbean, Puerto ricans, Cubans, Lebanese, Chinese, and now Venezuelans.
Agree that those groups do not and should not reject their European heritage. It is a major part of their heritage and culture and, in many cases, the predominant part of their heritage.

To be clear though, only the Dominican Republic abolished slavery early. Slavery did not end in Venezuela until the 1850s, well after the English-speaking Caribbean. The decline of slavery was gradual there. There were still over 20,000 slaves at the time of actual abolition in the 1850s. Cuba did not end slavery until the 1880s.
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Old 02-07-2019, 11:59 AM
 
Location: London, UK
2,870 posts, read 1,544,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snapshoot View Post
PEOPLE have to understand something Puerto ricans, Cubans, Venezuelans, Dominicans do not reject their white heritage, why would they?
Of course they shouldn't reject it, however the anger from US blacks is that they prioritise this heritage over their African heritage, which is why the term 'indio' as used in DR to denote people of dark skin is so contentious.

Yes, race is an after-thought and not the centre of everything as it sometimes seems to be in the States but when the subject does arise that sneaky 'colourism' does creep in. The same can be said across the hemisphere although in the DR variables exist that make it that bit more distasteful such as the violent historical feud with Haiti (with reason to some extent) and covert terms like 'indio'.
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Old 02-07-2019, 12:08 PM
 
142 posts, read 33,635 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pueblofuerte View Post
Of course they shouldn't reject it, however the anger from US blacks is that they prioritise this heritage over their African heritage, which is why the term 'indio' as used in DR to denote people of dark skin is so contentious.

Yes, race is an after-thought and not the centre of everything as it sometimes seems to be in the States but when the subject does arise that sneaky 'colourism' does creep in. The same can be said across the hemisphere although in the DR variables exist that make it that bit more distasteful such as the violent historical feud with Haiti (with reason to some extent) and covert terms like 'indio'.
Dominican used the word trigueño for light brown people, trigueño means " el color del trigo" (the color of wheat) Do that means they are denying blackness and trying to pass as wheat? let me know.

Indio in Dr is a color and mainly could be translated as "brown skin like an Indian", not as trying to pass as an actual Indian.
Even Dominicans have trouble understanding the origin of the term and the Dominican IDs do not longer have that, (drivers licence still do) DR haven't collected racial information since the 70s. The info in the IDs is self reported. IF you ever find one of the old IDs you will see that they do not say RACE, they say "color de piel" = indio, not raza. Dominicans do not use the term Indio to deny blackness but to more accurately describe a color which is not as light as white and not as dark as Moreno, although this largely depends on the person and there are huge overlaps between Indio and Moreno (dark brown).

DR has never collected racial information, the First census with the word Race was done in the 1910s during the US occupation, before the U.S occupation the D.R. didn’t even do racial censuses as it was too difficult to categorize races. The word Race has not been in the last 3 census. Am not sure it was in the 1970 census i dont really know.

Last edited by Snapshoot; 02-07-2019 at 12:36 PM..
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Old 02-07-2019, 12:57 PM
 
Location: London, UK
2,870 posts, read 1,544,263 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snapshoot View Post
Dominicans do not use the term Indio to deny blackness but to more accurately describe a color which is not as light as white and not as dark as Moreno
This is BS and you know it. I spent years in Washington Heights among the Dominican community, I know DR I've been there, travelled the North-Eastern quarter of the island and now there's a growing presence of Dominicans here in London. I've seen clearly mostly black Dominicans refer to themselves as 'indio' this is not just a colour but a connotation and a constitutional attempt to play down their black heritage.

In some respects this is true across the whole hemisphere but in the DR this behaviour is more pronounced. I equally dislike the white shaming found in the States but by this I'm not going to deny the intrinsic colourism perpetuated in Latin America. The answer is clearly something in the middle.
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Old 02-07-2019, 01:06 PM
 
142 posts, read 33,635 times
Reputation: 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pueblofuerte View Post
This is BS and you know it. I spent years in Washington Heights among the Dominican community, I know DR I've been there, travelled the North-Eastern quarter of the island and now there's a growing presence of Dominicans here in London. I've seen clearly mostly black Dominicans refer to themselves as 'indio' this is not just a colour but a connotation and a constitutional attempt to play down their black heritage.

In some respects this is true across the whole hemisphere but in the DR this behaviour is more pronounced. I equally dislike the white shaming found in the States but by this I'm not going to deny the intrinsic colourism perpetuated in Latin America. The answer is clearly something in the middle.
you cant be more wrong indio is a color, just as moreno, trigueño, ect not a race, no one is trying to pass as Indian. Actually for Dominicans the word indio as race, is used as meaning dumb. Do you think i am Indian? means do you think am dumb?. As a historical reference of how the Spanish used to fooled the Indians changing broken pieces for mirrors for gold. I dont see Dominicans overly celebrating their Native-american heritage eather as you seem to imply. Besides some towns names and some avenues i dont see much reference to them at all.

There not much left of the tainos in DR, the average Dominican is only 8-10% Indian by DNA.

Dominicans do celebrate their African heritage, and have preserved more African culture than lets say African Americans.
African culture is live and well in DR. African religion is practiced, music, food, art, ect.

you have to think like a Dominican to understand the nuances.

You need to remove your racist glasses, not everything you think is racist, trully is.

i have attached a Dominican drivers licence for you information, indio is an skin color not a race.
Attached Thumbnails
The Systematic Erasure of African Descendents in Latin America-04-27_cedula2.jpg  

Last edited by Snapshoot; 02-07-2019 at 01:41 PM..
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