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Old 06-10-2019, 10:54 AM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 14 days ago)
 
5,345 posts, read 8,083,624 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by clb10 View Post
I bet all those people who bought property in the Dominican Republic after a "magical" vacation are regretting their hasty decisions now.
Maybe some of the people that bought “hastily,” but I doubt most are whether they bought it hastily or not. Those people are living their lives in the DR while you aren’t. You depend on the media while they depend on their personal observations and the people they know. For most people in one group or the other, their perception of the country is going to be very different. Even within the country its different from one area to another in ways that its hard to describe unless a person lives it in person.

I’m willing to bet most people are fine, living their daly routines as if nothing happened. They still see the same neighbors, the same park, they go to the same supermarket, the same traffic jam (if in a high traffic area), the same tourists (if in a tourist zone), the same golf course, the same bars, the same tranquil countryside, etc. Everything basically looks the same and most of the people they see are the same friendly folks they known.

They go to the local mall or restaurant or store knowing they will not be a victim to a mass shooter. There are countries where massacres in an airport, a nightclub, a mall, a factory or wherever is so common most people think this is normal. There are countries where even children need to go through a metal detector to feel safe at their own schools, where graduations are evacuated because some kid threatened to shoot and kill as many people as possible. Where parents go rushing and crying to their children’s school because another kid decided to shoot at everything that moved in the place.

Last edited by AntonioR; 06-10-2019 at 11:37 AM..
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Old 06-18-2019, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, North Carolina
2,095 posts, read 1,092,895 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Costa Rica felt like the 51st American state. There are so many American chains and fast-food restaurants, it was unexpected.
We stayed away from the americanized restaurants and stuck with the local mom-n-pop places (sodas). We could get a nice meal there for $4-$5, typically (drinks extra). The food was always fresh and every soda we visited was incredibly clean. The people were very nice, as well.
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Old 06-18-2019, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,956 posts, read 36,269,137 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by reds37win View Post
We stayed away from the americanized restaurants and stuck with the local mom-n-pop places (sodas). We could get a nice meal there for $4-$5, typically (drinks extra). The food was always fresh and every soda we visited was incredibly clean. The people were very nice, as well.
Viewing San Jose, Costa Rica...a pretty cool pedestrian street!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ua1BUbiv1k&t=39s
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Old 06-26-2019, 09:29 AM
 
118 posts, read 99,684 times
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Based on visits and first hand stories from several friends living in Chile and reading stats is seems like
Chile is overall a safe place to live. Quality infrastructure, medical care and overall prosperity.
High on my list after Spain.

I've lived in the Dominican Republic, own property there and travel there often.
I doubt that I will ever live there as I don't see the country improving as far as education, social
responsibility, customer service, politics etc. It's all fun when I visit but the reality is far different. Most
people I know there would leave in a heartbeat with the exception of the ones that are well off.
They are the ones with a visa and are able to shop in Miami & Spain and send their kids out of the country
for summer camp etc.

My neighbor in DR (an attorney) moved to Chile because her law degree would be validated there and she
could immediately work. She has returned to the DR yearly and even stayed for 1 year
to see if she could make the move back. It did not work out as she couldn't (once again)
get used to the lack of infrastructure, education and the disorganization. I've even met people from the DR
here in Atlanta that have sold everything over there and settled here.

I've also had extended stays in central Mexico and have no complaints. Never had any safety or
administrative issues. Services and medical care have all been reliable and customer service is overall good.
Plenty of cultural activities, concerts, theater etc. Also available are many major US stores (if you're into that)
and where we stay we can walk to many of them. The weather is also great (not hot, not humid) except
that the 6000ft elevation gets to me at first.

There are plenty of crime stats about Mexico and that worries me in the long term except that for now the area
I visit has only changed in terms of sprawl, petty theft etc.

At this point I think that in the future I will stay a few months at a time in the countries I've mentioned.
Who knows what the future will bring. Mostly depends on affordability, family and what my kids end up doing once we become
empty nesters.
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Old 06-26-2019, 10:07 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,954 posts, read 9,534,663 times
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[
Quote:
Originally Posted by caragitana View Post
Based on visits and first hand stories from several friends living in Chile and reading stats is seems like Chile is overall a safe place to live. Quality infrastructure, medical care and overall prosperity. High on my list after Spain.
* Based on what I hear in the grapevine it does seem like it's pretty safe and fairly well organized. I don't know if I would live there, though. My impression of chilenos is they're kinda stuck up and kinda racist. I guess I'd have to visit first to see how prevailing an attitude that is.

* I definitely would live in Spain, I've been there, I like the culture.

* The only place I'd live in Mexico would be Mexico City for the diversity of the large city; other places either too boring or too unsafe. For example, Puebla, I like the city, it's a decent place, fairly safe as far as things go, but I don't know if I would feel bored after being there for six months.

* I suppose I'd live in Colombia. If I didn't have family there I suppose Bogota would be ok. Manizales is nice too but might end up feeling too small after a year. As far as safety though, you do have to be careful even in the cities that are supposedly the "safer cities", like Manizales. It's not like Spain where you can walk around nonchalantly holding your cellphone/laptop. In any city of decent size in Colombia you always have to take that into consideration whenever you are outside.

Quote:
I've also had extended stays in central Mexico and have no complaints. Never had any safety or
administrative issues.
Define "central Mexico."
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Old 06-26-2019, 05:00 PM
 
118 posts, read 99,684 times
Reputation: 152
80skeys

It’s a secret gem named Queretaro, Mexico.
Not a boring city at all. The weather is nice and the city has plenty of food, attractions, concerts, theatre etc. There are hundreds of foreign companies there. Over 30 aerospace, over a dozen automotive, home appliances, food industry & tech.
Unemployment rate is low. It’s not really considered an expat haven however many foreigners live there because of the many international companies.

Arkansas State Univ has a fully accredited campus there on over 300 acres.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Querétaro_City
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Old 06-26-2019, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
986 posts, read 1,977,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by caragitana View Post
80skeys

It’s a secret gem named Queretaro, Mexico.
Not a boring city at all. The weather is nice and the city has plenty of food, attractions, concerts, theatre etc. There are hundreds of foreign companies there. Over 30 aerospace, over a dozen automotive, home appliances, food industry & tech.
Unemployment rate is low. It’s not really considered an expat haven however many foreigners live there because of the many international companies.

Arkansas State Univ has a fully accredited campus there on over 300 acres.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Querétaro_City
I second this...it´s a really nice city. Definitely one of the most liveable and safest spots in MX...we hope that remains, since the security situation there is more fluid nowadays than Colombia´s.
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Old 06-27-2019, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,954 posts, read 9,534,663 times
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My question about Queretaro would be: is there something that would set it apart from other IT/university cities in other parts of the world? In other words, what would make it an appealing place to live as opposed to Silicon Valley, or Vancouver, or Bangalore ... ? You get my drift. Like, it's a Mexican city but has it morphed into a sort of generic international city, or is it still very much Mexican?

aab7755: why don't you you move there, instead of El Paso?
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Old 06-27-2019, 11:52 AM
 
118 posts, read 99,684 times
Reputation: 152
I dont think it’s anything like the cities you mentioned. It feels like a scenic Mexican city with colonial architecture, amazing views and international amenities.
You can eat a variety of international foods or opt for American food chains like PF Changs or even watch the latest movies in English in a nice theatre where you can eat & drink at your seat.

It’s affordable for us and we feel comfortable strolling the cobblestone streets without the extreme heat or humidity, eating great Mexican food and enjoying good friends.

Last week we missed a great Puerto Rican salsa concert but hope to be there for the next one!
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Old 06-27-2019, 07:14 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
986 posts, read 1,977,024 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post

aab7755: why don't you you move there, instead of El Paso?
At my 34 years of age, I´d best get a US teachers´ pension now...it´ll take me a while to become vested, but if I keep bouncing from country to country I won´t pay enough into any system. Just savings doesn´t necessarily cut it. Texas teachers usually don´t pay into Social Security, which sounds bad, but they make so much compared to the neighboring states that I can also load up an IRA which gives me a little more control with where my money is headed. I know you do well with what you do, but too many cats my age aren´t even thinking about this...and it´s going to bite them much later.

I´d be fine retiring south of the border, but I think I better start making greenbacks now. Plus I think you´d agree with me, it´s easier for our daughter to more or less understand Hispanic culture living in the States and visiting places like Colombia and Puerto Rico (I also lived in the latter and have incredible friends still there). At least here in Pereira you´re so far removed from North America that just visiting a couple times a year might not cut it...I doubt her English would ever sound native if we stayed here.

No complaints, just stating how I think it would be for us.

El Paso is still on the map for us...but so are San Antonio and Dallas. Shoot, all of Texas is basically bilingual now...it doesn´t matter if it is 85% Hispanic (EP) or a mere 35% (DFW), it´s thick up in there and staying abreast with the language and culture wouldn´t be difficult. Shoot, visiting Mexico on the regular from Texas is no big deal either. Direct flights from Houston and Dallas to Bogotá also.

Last edited by aab7855; 06-27-2019 at 07:23 PM..
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