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Old 02-19-2019, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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People from the Canary Islands settled in south Louisiana in the late 1700s. This is an old documentary about their descendants.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=KqJQcv1Jm2A
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Old 02-19-2019, 08:33 PM
AFP
 
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Does their culture still live on with their descendants? This video looks to be about 40 years old.
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Old 02-20-2019, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
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Thatīs my people though!!! We always thought we were French and nothing else, but it ends up after researching our family history that Iīm at least a quarter Spanish, coming from both my mom and dadīs side. In places like St. Bernard Parish, the Isleņos kept to themselves more, and their festivals still keep the culture alive. Sadly Hurricane Katrina was a huge blow for them, and the traditional way of life you see in that video is slowly going away. A friend of mine from Spain who used to be a journalist in New Orlens went down to the Isleņos festival, when she interviews a local you can tell heīs struggling with the language, he even gets the gender wrong in the interview...he does have that Canarian/Venezuelan-esque accent though:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45UhVfXlFG0

My parents come from southwest Louisiana, my dad being from New Iberia, a city settled by Canary Islanders and Andalucians. Common last names there are Romero, Nuņez and Miguez. The last name Domingue, which was on his motherīs side, is pretty common in that region as well, and everyone takes it for being French. Guess what? Most of the people with that last name actually arrived to Louisiana from the Canary Islands with the last name Dominguez. They either got tired of their last name being incorrectly pronounced, or decided to franc-ify their name to better fit in and show respect, or both. My mom is from Abbeville, and her youngest brother and sister definitely look latino (dark hair, dark eyes, tan), even though Mom has blue eyes and light brown hair. When my uncle was in California, people were constantly speaking to him in Spanish even though he doesnīt understand any! Basically, the Spanish community in that part of Louisiana assimilated much more to French society.

In conclusion, there has been an isolated Isleņo community southeast of New Orleans, but its long-term survival is at risk. Maybe they should send in teachers and other cultural figures from the Canary Islands to breathe life into the community; it worked for the Cajuns when they brought teachers in from France to live and work in Lafayette. It may be a different, more modern version of the language, but itīs keeping it around in some form.

Last edited by aab7855; 02-20-2019 at 07:47 AM..
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Old 02-20-2019, 07:59 AM
AFP
 
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This is really cool my Bettencourt line leads to the Canaries in the 1400's and most likely some others as well. I have distant autosomal DNA matches in La Gomera, Gran Canaria and Tenerife.
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Old 02-20-2019, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
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For much of the 1900s, an Isleņo had a lot of influence in Louisiana politics. But modern Isleņos have no reason to claim him.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leander_Perez
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Old 02-20-2019, 11:22 AM
 
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Let us not forget the most famous Isleņo: Judge Leander Perez.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gnz0htw1m_E

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
But modern Isleņos have no reason to claim him.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leander_Perez
He needs to be mentioned more often in Hispanic history! A lot of "Latinos" are curious to know what role they played in civil rights history.

Next hispanic history month, we should promote Perez's legacy.
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Old 02-20-2019, 11:43 AM
AFP
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tritone View Post
Let us not forget the most famous Isleņo: Judge Leander Perez.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gnz0htw1m_E



He needs to be mentioned more often in Hispanic history! A lot of "Latinos" are curious to know what role they played in civil rights history.

Next hispanic history month, we should promote Perez's legacy.
He's not a Hispanic or a Latino he's a descendant of Spaniards directly from the Canaries that never set foot in Latin America.


Why would they want to claim Perez? You sound like you have a chip on your shoulder get a life.
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Old 02-20-2019, 11:52 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AFP View Post
He's not a Hispanic or a Latino he's a descendant of Spaniards directly from the Canaries that never set foot in Latin America.
"Hispanic" means any person of Spanish or Spanish-speaking origin, or any person with a Spanish surname. Perez is all of those things. Many of today's "hispanics" are not from Latin America. New Mexicans and Tejanos are considered "Hispanic". Linda Chavez is a good example.

Spanish descendants from Louisiana are similar to New Mexicans. Why shouldn't they be considered "hispanic"?

Quote:
Why would they want to claim Perez?
Judge Perez is a notable person who was a hispanic. He should be better known in hispanic history. A lot of people wonder what "hispanics" were saying during the civil rights movement. Why not mention Judge Perez?
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Old 02-20-2019, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
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The archbishop of New Orleans even ex-communicated the Perez family because "Judge" was acting like such a jackass, it didnīt seem to have much effect on how he ran his fiefdom--not just St. Bernard but large parts of Plaquemines as well, check out the map and youīll see that the mouth of the Mississippi River is there..pretty important in spite of the low population.
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Old 02-20-2019, 12:00 PM
AFP
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tritone View Post
"Hispanic" means any person of Spanish or Spanish-speaking origin, or any person with a Spanish surname. Perez is all of those things. Many of today's "hispanics" are not from Latin America. New Mexicans and Tejanos are considered "Hispanic". Linda Chavez is a good example.

Spanish descendants from Louisiana are similar to New Mexicans. Why shouldn't they be considered "hispanic"?



Judge Perez is notable person who was a hispanic. He should be better known in hispanic history. A lot of people wonder what "hispanics" were saying during the civil rights movement. Why not mention Judge Perez?
Islenos claim Spanuard descent to my knowledge that is different than Hispanic descent Spaniards do not consider themselves Hispanics based on how that term is generally understood in the USA they refer to themselves as Ibericos rarely does that Hispanic term outside of the USA.


Linda Chaves is a descendant of colonial Spaniards from Extremadura and Andalusia as well as New Christians(forcibly converted Sephardic Jews) and she also carries some Amerindian ancestry. You're generalizing what Hispanic is and you don't know enough about the fine details.


Islenos aren't the same as Spanish descendants from New Mexico the cultures are not similar.


Talk to them about it and them claim to be Spaniards primarily from the Canaries not Hispanics. You have a lot of nerve arbitrarily applying USA census labels to specific groups.
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