U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-15-2019, 12:59 PM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 12 days ago)
 
5,168 posts, read 8,019,848 times
Reputation: 4264

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
There are places where drug money gets fronted as legitimate business, and there are places where the money just passes through. This depends a lot on the aspirations of the people who own the money. Some of them have political aspirations, or aspirations of combining illicit business with legitimate business, while others don't have these aspirations. It also depends on where drug money is being laundered at this moment in time - this is volatile, it changes from place to place responding to political pressure, pressure from the U.S., etc. That's why I'm saying the jury is out on the Dominican Republic for the time being.
I agree the DR is still on murky water, but it has nothing to do with drug money. Like I said, there isn't enough drug money in the Caribbean as a region to expect it has any effect on the national economies of any major countries.

I also know professionals that pool their money together to buy market research of the real estate market in SD and build apartment towers in the city. They also do background checks on the people interested in buying. They are basically making gold in that market. Some towers have given them over 60% of pure profits, which they split depending how much each person invest in each tower. It isn't how many people think it is, but it does help in keeping the competition relatively low and the profits high.

Quote:
Completely wrong. That article is referring to low-level middlemen in the United States. The article itself says "a fair amount makes its way back to Latin America." This is an understatement - the people writing the article are either clueless, or more likely they have a political agenda for phrasing it in that manner. The reality is that the bulk of the profit goes back to Colombia. Whatever money the middle men make is eaten up by two things: overhead, and obligation to the Colombians. Anything left over (profit) for the middle man is small potatoes comparitively speaking.

Recently Mexican cartels have been trying to establish themselves in Colombia because they're not happy with how much of the money the Colombian cartels are keeping.

You think Colombians at the origin are being paid in pesos? They're not, they're paid in dollars. There's a whole network of coordinated money laundering between the U.S. down through Central America and the Caribbean (and China, believe it or not) into Colombia for the sole purpose of making sure dollars make their way back to the cartels in Colombia.

Some middle man making a million dollars for his end of the business here in the U.S. - this is a drop in the bucket compared to what the cartel people in Colombia are making.
I beg to differ. While its still a lot, drug money simply isn't enough to affect the economy of a country like Colombia, which is the second most affected country due to drug money in the world. There might be some regions where drug money has some effect, but not at national levels and not at major cities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-15-2019, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
974 posts, read 1,963,222 times
Reputation: 1023
It´s probably hard to know since all of it is so under the table...

But I can say that when there was more impunity still, Cali was a paradise compared to Medellín and Bogotá...and when the cartels got broken up in smaller organizations, that artificial economy and sources of investment fell apart...Cali is so far behind the other large cities now.

So while I´m not certain of the overall effects of drug money in Colombia today (rest assured it pays the tuition for AT LEAST 10-15% of private school families in Pereira), it has certainly been a driving force of employment and investment in the past and is sorely "missed" when not allowed to flourish with impunity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-15-2019, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
974 posts, read 1,963,222 times
Reputation: 1023
Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
I agree the DR is still on murky water, but it has nothing to do with drug money. Like I said, there isn't enough drug money in the Caribbean as a region to expect it has any effect on the national economies of any major countries.
From living in Puerto Rico I certainly heard a lot about the DR´s role in money laundering, if nothing else. Murky waters indeed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-15-2019, 02:12 PM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 12 days ago)
 
5,168 posts, read 8,019,848 times
Reputation: 4264
Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
From living in Puerto Rico I certainly heard a lot about the DR´s role in money laundering, if nothing else. Murky waters indeed.
You are always going to get that in PR. Talking bad about the DR is almost a national sport on that island that has existed since the USA began to developed it. Some Puerto Ricans even refer to the república as an independence movement and as type of arrangement with the USA, knowing very well República Dominicana comes to everyones mind when they hear república. lol

They basically need to control the immigration situation with Haiti. The border already has the widest gap in the whole hemisphere and its only going to get wider every year, because Haiti isn't going anywhere any time soon. They need to grow at 7% every year for the next 100 years to reach the DR current economic level, and that's according to the World Bank. Its ridiculous and the migration pressure is only going to rise. Haiti is not meeting its minimum goals to reach the current DR in a century. Haiti is excellent at producing people, but giving them or their children a good life is another story.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-15-2019, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,809 posts, read 9,470,378 times
Reputation: 2950
Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
...
By the way, did you see my post on El Paso? I really recommend you don't move there. I'm very familiar with life in El Paso, NM, southern TX - it's *super* easy for people to get in ruts there. You're in a rut in Colombia .... you could easily find yourself in the same rut in El Paso or Albuquerque.

I do highly recommend you consider California. It's the world's 5th-largest economy, 30% of the population is Mexican/Mexican-American... plenty of opportunities for you as a bilingual person, and people as a whole are way more involved and forward-thinking with their lives. More content in general.

That said, avoid places like Stockton, Fresno, Modesto, Bakersfield - these cities have economic problems, are very much stuck in their own ruts.

Instead, almost every other place in California will afford you good opportunities.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-15-2019, 05:57 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,539 posts, read 70,455,727 times
Reputation: 76499
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmlandis View Post
Read a New York Times article on Honduras (San Pedro Sula) and how MS 13 and 18th Street pretty much control the country. The president seems to have less power than the gangs there. I was a development work (Peace Corps) in 80s and sad to see this is what has happened. Murders, masses of people wanting to leave for the USA and of course Trump threatening to cut off all assistance unless they cut immigration.

Is there any home for the northern triangle countries? Maybe they were better off as Spanish colonies? Or perhaps they need a massive amount of investment - if not from the US then maybe from China so people at least have jobs and don't see the need to immigrate. Young people with jobs won't join gangs so easily. It also looks as if police and the government in Honduras need to start prosecuting murders - 95% of murders are never solved.

Thoughts? I know Colombia managed to turn things around from 20 years back.
If you were a development worker in SP Sula back in the 80's, I would think you've known Honduras during quieter times, or was that during the Contra war? Much of Honduras, and San Pedro, used to be placid, sleepy little places. Gangs didn't exist. I've read from multiple sources, that the gangs started when people fled the region after the Contra war had introduced violence into the country, and also, young people growing up in LA, then returning home, learned to form gangs. Gangs were a North American export in that respect, back to Central America.

Honduras was dominated economically by US-based fruit companies, raising bananas for export. Initiatives to spur other forms of economic development were lacking. OP, what kind of projects were you and other Peace Corps workers doing in Honduras, in the 80's? Please share your experiences and perspectives.

I can't imagine why you'd say, that Central America or Honduras may have been better off under the Spanish. How would that have been any different, than the US exploiting the region? The problem has been, that whenever a country got a good president who wanted to pursue economic development to raise the standard of living for everyone, the US has invaded, and installed their own person. Read the book "Bitter Fruit", about how that went down in Guatemala, for an example. The book is based on documents acquired through the Freedom of Information Act.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-15-2019, 06:05 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,539 posts, read 70,455,727 times
Reputation: 76499
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scientific View Post

As far as the opportunities in Central America? What natural resources do these countries have outside of agriculture? El Salvador has been the most densely populated country in the Western hemisphere for a very long time. During this decade, Honduras's population has surged and so has Guatemala. Overpopulation, and few resources is a major issue in my opinion. The maras have taken a life of their own, and it's going to take more than locking them up or bringing jobs to improve the situation. The job market now is so globalized, the abundance of cheap labor makes it so that these countries will have a very difficult time to improve their middle class.
Agriculture can be done profitably and sustainably. Guatemala and Honduras have had cattle ranching, exporting beef to the US. United Fruit among others took over some of the cattle-ranching loans in Honduras, to turn it into banana plantations. But I imagine that there are still cattle ranches in the highlands.

Some Guatemalans have gone over to organic farming for the US market; this is more profitable, so workers can get paid better.

The highlands of Central America have gold and nickel, among other minerals, that they've export4ed to the US and Canada. Here's more on mining in Honduras:

https://www.nationsencyclopedia.com/...as-MINING.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2019, 06:57 AM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 12 days ago)
 
5,168 posts, read 8,019,848 times
Reputation: 4264
Chiquita bananas did some crazy things in Honduras. They even basically placed presidents and bananas became Honduras main exports. That’s where it was coined ‘banana republic.’ Chiquita had so much power in that country.

There was also an American that went to Nicaragua and basically became a dictator there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2019, 07:54 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
9,521 posts, read 9,402,418 times
Reputation: 6667
Is this man’s name known in Central America?
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sam_Zemurray
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-16-2019, 03:52 PM
 
204 posts, read 296,850 times
Reputation: 199
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Agriculture can be done profitably and sustainably. Guatemala and Honduras have had cattle ranching, exporting beef to the US. United Fruit among others took over some of the cattle-ranching loans in Honduras, to turn it into banana plantations. But I imagine that there are still cattle ranches in the highlands.

Some Guatemalans have gone over to organic farming for the US market; this is more profitable, so workers can get paid better.

The highlands of Central America have gold and nickel, among other minerals, that they've export4ed to the US and Canada. Here's more on mining in Honduras:

https://www.nationsencyclopedia.com/...as-MINING.html
I'm no economist, but agriculture is what theyve always done. What's the definitions of insanity? They need to reavulate this. Coffee , tobacco, & bananas isnt enough. It isnt a question of how inefficient agriculture is, its whether it's big enough to provide opportunities. This isnt the the 1960s anymore. Especially when their GDPs are so heavily relying on remittances.

The gang situation is a cycle in terms of tourism. Some people are so scared to visit Guatemala or El Salvador it hurts the potential tourism dollars they can see. Tikal is just as or if not more more majestic than Machu Pichu. & the coast of El Salvador is probably a top 5 world surfing destination.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top