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Old 05-29-2019, 01:58 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 23 days ago)
 
5,417 posts, read 8,114,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scientific View Post
I'm not used to seeing people carry machetes in the DR openly. I've only really seen it in Panama and El Salvador. The older ranchers aren't shy about carrying them everywhere.
You do see it in the countryside (at least in the Cibao Valley countryside is somewhat visible), but its mostly men in their 40s and up, usually simple country guys. It is going away though. Before it was much more common, but mostly in the countryside.

Now that I think of it, I have never seen a woman even carry one to their man, much less carry one for the sake of carrying it. Its always men.

Many things are becoming part of history. For example, in Punta Cana some tours show a wooden house as the typical Dominican countryside home. Even in Dominican culture it is still used as the typical home in the countryside. The only problem is that its no longer true and it stop being true in the last 20-30 years or so. Most people everywhere now live in cement homes with brightly painted walls and such. Many people keep the wooden home if it was built by a family member, but right next to it they build the new cement home as a sign of progress. Most people destroy the wooden home and other people simply are starting with a new parcel of land. The point is that the typical Dominican lives in a cement home, but that is not (yet) part of the country's folklore.

Even in the cities most people that were in the DR during the 1970's, 80's, and even 90's would tell you most homes were made of wood. That is simply no longer true.

Last edited by AntonioR; 05-29-2019 at 02:13 PM..
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Old 05-29-2019, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
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Machetes and knives are to be found all over the Hispanic new world, all the way from the southwest U.S. downwards. When these are used in street fights, it's because, as someone else mentioned, other things like guns are more expensive and not readily available. Additionally, as another person mentioned, there's definitely something "Hispanic" about knives - the use of knives/machetes as a common tool, not just for fighting but as an agricultural thing - probably comes from the old world (Spain). I have seen similar "adeptness" and "ubiquitiousness" of the use of knives in Spain as I have in Mexico, New Mexico, Colombia.

I think this says something, not just about knives, but that we (Hispanics) are nimble and adept at working with our hands.


As for machetes, I have driven by the neighborhood of Siloe in Cali (Colombia) and seen teenage kids walking around with machetes. Obviously up to no good. You will also see a lot of farmers carrying machetes in the coffee growing region down there, but this is obviously for legitimate agricultural purpose.

In the neighborhood I grew up in (Albuquerque), a lot of the cholos and thugs carried knives (and used them in fights).

Years ago when I was a young man, I was working with some NY Puerto Ricans on the East Coast. One afternoon I was opening a box or something in the office with a knife, which I dropped or fumbled, and one of the guys joked "imagine that, a Hispanic who doesn't know how to handle a knife!"
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Old 05-30-2019, 07:58 AM
 
138 posts, read 26,435 times
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is a thing in Jamaica also.
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Old 07-02-2019, 12:00 PM
 
Location: Squirrel Tree
1,201 posts, read 286,965 times
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It's probably similar to sword fighting in European history.
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Old 07-02-2019, 01:22 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 23 days ago)
 
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It’s in this Dominican traditional song of the American invasion of 1916. At a certain point in the song it says the Dominicans will attack the American troops with a machete on hand or something like that. This is an old song. Now it’s sung as a tradition more than anything.

This genre has much liking especially in the Cibao Valley, although tourists are welcome with it most time at the Punta Cana airport and other airports. Reality is that its mostly played and heard in the Cibao Valley while elsewhere not so much. You even hear this genre at the night clubs, usually the music is loud enough to be heard from the street (many clubs are also quite open too).

This genre has all three main cultures on full display, mixed to create the sound. The drum comes from Guinea and hasn’t changed at all. The accordion comes from Europe and the güira (the scrape instrument) is a Taino instrument that was originally made from a hard fruit (they still make it in Puerto Rico), but the modern one is completely made of metal.


Last edited by AntonioR; 07-02-2019 at 01:35 PM..
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Old 07-03-2019, 11:36 AM
 
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Maybe they inherited it from the Africans.
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Old 07-03-2019, 04:38 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 23 days ago)
 
5,417 posts, read 8,114,762 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grabandgo View Post
is a thing in Jamaica also.
Wasn’t Jamaica a Spanish place for almost 150 years?

That island was conquered by the Spanish conquistador Juan de Esquivel when he left with an expedition from Santo Domingo. Some places on that island still have their names in Spanish (ie. Ocho Rios means The Eight Rivers in Spanish). While most Spanish settlers left the island when the English pirate William Cromwell took over the island in 1655 (ironically, prior to that in the same voyage he tried to take over Hispaniola but failed outside of Santo Domingo, he couldn’t go back to England with nothing to show for, lol), but many Spanish settlers stay and mixed with the English and other people the English brought there. Some Jamaicans have a little of Taino blood in their DNA, which points to also having Spanish ancestors somewhere in their genealogy. Some of their traditions probably were kept on that island by the English, especially those that they saw a use for.

Anyway, in a cave found inside a national park on the eastern DR is a Spaniard that was drawn by the Taino indians. Scientists think it was Juan de Esquivel because it looks a lot like him. He was one of the founders of some cities on that island, including Higüey which isn’t too far from there. Also Juan Ponce de Leon’s house is near there too, but in another direction. He lived there before conquering and settling Puerto Rico, plus discovering the Florida peninsula where he was killed.
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Old 07-04-2019, 11:33 AM
mym
 
577 posts, read 810,934 times
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humanity has a long history of re-purposing farm implements into weapons

growing up in the country hills, if you saw a one armed man, chances were he tried blocking a machete strike with his forearm during a drunken fight at the wrong colmado
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Old 08-05-2019, 06:32 PM
 
Location: EU
62 posts, read 16,429 times
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The problem of that machete culture is that they're exporting it to Spain as well... specially to Madrid and Barcelona, where machete fights (98% of them involve Dominicans and in a lesser extent, Salvadorians) are now common, sadly. Including the use of them by many underage gang members, which manage to get them even inside night clubs. The machetes are deadly weapons.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AFP View Post
One wrong move and his longanisa is gone.
I laughed so hard at this, here you go with a positive REP for you.
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Old 08-06-2019, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,046 posts, read 9,566,326 times
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First, I haven't heard of any "machete fights" in Spain.

Second, there's no way anyone can "sneak" a machete into a club if there's security patting you down at the door.

Quit fabricating nonsense.
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