U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 06-13-2019, 04:14 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,164,246 times
Reputation: 9483

Advertisements

I guess it makes sense that Haiti has had some massive earthquakes, one quite recently. How is Dominican Republic ready and prepared for one? What do you think would be the results?

I was just looking at YouTube, and didn't realize that this was just a few months ago...February 2019, with a 5.3:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYoYrlm4JEw
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-13-2019, 06:34 AM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 16 days ago)
 
5,196 posts, read 8,029,582 times
Reputation: 4269
You have earthquake in most of the Caribbean islands except in eastern and central Cuban, in the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, and the ABC islands. Basically any islands with a mountainous interior will have earthquakes and earthquake faults. In the Lesser Antilles some islands have volcanoes too (remember the island of Montserrat which a few years ago had to be entirely evacuated.) The ground does shake several months in the year and that include Santo Domingo. The risk is the same that exist in much of California (including the major cities) or in much of Italy. The DR does have the highest mountains in the Caribbean, higher than the Appalachians in the northeastern US (mostly in the Central, Neiba, and Bahoruco mountains.) Pico Duarte is the highest mountain and it surpasses the 10,000 feet. The weather isn’t tropical up there and in some valleys.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2019, 06:49 AM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 16 days ago)
 
5,196 posts, read 8,029,582 times
Reputation: 4269
I also forgot to say that earthquake is the main reason why most Spanish colonial buildings don’t exist in the interior of the DR. The cities and original coats of arm is still there, but they have very little colonial buildings if at all. Other with there would had existed at least 16 Spanish colonial historic cities in the interior.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2019, 09:40 AM
Status: "Then everything change forever..." (set 16 days ago)
 
5,196 posts, read 8,029,582 times
Reputation: 4269
Another thing that happens, though is rarely, is some of the ash when a volcano blows or wakes up in the Lesser Antilles is taken to Hispaniola and Puerto Rico (of the big islands) by the wind. The trade winds help in mediating the heat and humidity in most of the islands and blow from east to west, but sometimes it also carries some externalities from other islands.

Much more often is the Sahara Desert dust that blows off northern Africa. Some is so strong that it reaches the Caribbean. It happens several times a year. On those days the sun looks somewhat murky and anyone with a respiratory disease such as asthma will see their conditions flare up. That’s also the main reason why there is a trace of sand, especially on the sides of roads, through out most islands of the Caribbean.

Both incidents are usually warned by weather reporters on television, radio, and the internet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-13-2019, 05:56 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,164,246 times
Reputation: 9483
Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
You have earthquake in most of the Caribbean islands except in eastern and central Cuban, in the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, and the ABC islands. Basically any islands with a mountainous interior will have earthquakes and earthquake faults. In the Lesser Antilles some islands have volcanoes too (remember the island of Montserrat which a few years ago had to be entirely evacuated.) The ground does shake several months in the year and that include Santo Domingo. The risk is the same that exist in much of California (including the major cities) or in much of Italy. The DR does have the highest mountains in the Caribbean, higher than the Appalachians in the northeastern US (mostly in the Central, Neiba, and Bahoruco mountains.) Pico Duarte is the highest mountain and it surpasses the 10,000 feet. The weather isnít tropical up there and in some valleys.
Pretty interesting!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top