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Old 08-07-2019, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,038 posts, read 9,563,336 times
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This is the type of outdoor oven you see in New Mexico. You see them all over the place. They use them to make, not only tamales, but fry bread, Navajo tacos, etc.
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Old 08-07-2019, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,038 posts, read 9,563,336 times
Reputation: 3103
The difference between Mexican tamales and Colombian tamales:


Colombian tamales are:
- much bigger
- wrapped in a platano leaf
- filled with lots of different stuff including vegetables


Mexican tamales are:
- small
- only meat, no vegetables
- spicy - contain chile (picoso)


Both are equally delicious. If I want a full meal I'll eat part of a Colombian tamale. If I want a delicious spicy snack I'll grab a Mexican or New Mexican tamale.
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Old 08-07-2019, 12:04 PM
Status: "El Paso in our thoughts and prayers" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Canada
4,870 posts, read 4,486,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
The difference between Mexican tamales and Colombian tamales:


Colombian tamales are:
- much bigger
- wrapped in a platano leaf
- filled with lots of different stuff including vegetables

Colombian tamales are really good. I have been eating more colombian food lately, just had papas rellenas the other day, they were pretty damn good. i think Colombian food is underrated.

In southern (chiapas, tabasco) mexico tamales are also wrapped in platano leaf, but you are right the ones in corn husks are more popular through out mexico.
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Old 08-07-2019, 12:06 PM
Status: "El Paso in our thoughts and prayers" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Canada
4,870 posts, read 4,486,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
This is the type of outdoor oven you see in New Mexico. You see them all over the place. They use them to make, not only tamales, but fry bread, Navajo tacos, etc.
That little oven looks cool. For a second there I thought it was a temescal.
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Old 08-07-2019, 12:12 PM
Status: "El Paso in our thoughts and prayers" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Canada
4,870 posts, read 4,486,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post

What unifies the cuisine of these three countries, at least by the time their dishes are served in the same hole in the wall joints in Louisiana, is the savory pickled cabbage salad either on the side or on top of the main course. Honduran baleadas are also on point, waaayyy better than quesadillas if you ask me.


That pickled cabbage is called curtido. Its really good. Its my favorite part of eating pupusas. Its really good on chicharrones and yuca.

This turned into a thread about food, im getting hungry now...
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Old 08-07-2019, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,005 posts, read 1,984,430 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
That pickled cabbage is called curtido. Its really good. Its my favorite part of eating pupusas. Its really good on chicharrones and yuca.

This turned into a thread about food, im getting hungry now...
Yes, but what those catrachos do with it is something else, something stronger...they add a bunch of purple onions that seem to have been seeped in pure vinegar with maybe beets to give it an extra purple...the video I shared shows a little bit of that.

And yeah, curtido and pupusas are great! I take gringo friends to those hole in the wall places and they fall in love with the food...they´re assuming it´ll be like Mexican food and then it´s something totally different.
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Old 08-07-2019, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,005 posts, read 1,984,430 times
Reputation: 1046
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
The difference between Mexican tamales and Colombian tamales:


Colombian tamales are:
- much bigger
- wrapped in a platano leaf
- filled with lots of different stuff including vegetables


Mexican tamales are:
- small
- only meat, no vegetables
- spicy - contain chile (picoso)


Both are equally delicious. If I want a full meal I'll eat part of a Colombian tamale. If I want a delicious spicy snack I'll grab a Mexican or New Mexican tamale.
Overall I much prefer Mexican food, BUT....

There are three Colombian takes on things that I´ll take over the Mexican version any day:

1.) Chorizo. Yes, the chorizos off the street in Colombia are full of hunks of fat and not the best, but if you go to a proper place in Santa Rosa de Cabal or Caquetá, uff, talk about good. They´re elegant, pink, non-greasy pure diced pork which goes great with a dash of lime juice. Mexican/Spanish chorizo is good and all, but that red/orange Slim Jim style grease really makes me think twice...

2.) Tamales. Yes, the Mexican ones are good, but a Colombian tamal is something of beauty. It´s a full meal and not just a snack. My connect here does the Antioqueño rectangular style, usually with an entire chicken thigh in the middle...not to mention the potato, peas, carrots and all the herbs that go into the masa. It´s not an easy process, the guy showed me how he does it and it´s quite the day´s work. The Tolimense version is no joke either...it´s more square and tends to have a slice of pork, a chicken wing and a hard-boiled egg for variety. My custom way of eating either is to pick out the chicken first (since there´s bone) and then top the rest with guacamole and ají and go to town...

3.) Chicharrón. Colombians destroy this one, hands down! I don´t know why Mexicans boil them to make them soggy for the tacos, or dry them out to the point of being break-your-teeth hard to sell at taquerías.



Colombian food is underrated, but what disappoints me sometimes is the best versions are in places in the States and not in the country itself. This place in New Orleans is EXQUISITE, but you in Colombia you won´t find even half of what they try at their joint...it´s more gourmet fusion as well as some Venezuelan arepas...try telling that to someone who ate there and then booked a trip to Colombia trying to do a culinary pilgrimage...

https://www.facebook.com/maisarepas/
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Old 08-07-2019, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,038 posts, read 9,563,336 times
Reputation: 3103
oh hell yes, nothing in the world beats Colombian chorizos. they are out of this world. i went to Germany a few years ago thinking I'd find some sausages thatd give colombian chorizos a run for the money, but they didn't even come close.
that's not to say mexican chorizos are bad. they're not. they're very good. but the colombian ones are a whole different level.

what did you think about my reply to your post - Taos, Isleta, etc. I think your friend spent time in the States because she pronounces English words with an American accent. I realized later those people in the video are descended from the Canaries, this must be where the costumes come from.
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Old 08-07-2019, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,038 posts, read 9,563,336 times
Reputation: 3103
In colombia i usually eat home cooking but if i go out to eat I really dig almuerzo ejecutivo, I think it's pretty good in general

On my dad's side of the family we used to eat home cooking all the time but he's old now and most of his relatives have passed away (the ones he was close with anyway) so nowadays it's mostly restaurant fare for Mexican food
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Old 08-07-2019, 02:07 PM
 
215 posts, read 300,668 times
Reputation: 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
Hey the OP is a goof and a troll. But UrbanLuis is not. He's a guy who's genuinely interested in the culture. I think he's of Hispanic descent himself if I'm not mistaken.
I think we clarified that, and we cleared up our points. Even though we probably dont agree, but its all good.

Quote:
Mexican tamales are nothing like Colombian tamales.
(by the way I'm not bashing you, just clarifying this point.)
He cleared this up too. There's more than one type of Mexican tamal, and the Southern parts of Mexico make theirs similar to the ones in Central and South America. I will say my favorite ones are from Guatemala.
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