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Old 08-09-2019, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,087 posts, read 9,602,568 times
Reputation: 3149

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By the way the house in that Adonio video is a beautiful example of a pueblo style house that you find all over New Mexico. Flat roof. The chile hanging. The little wooden ladders. Those houses sell for a lot of money now. I'm sure he built it himself many years ago.

Nowadays you still seeing original examples of those houses scattered around the state. Original adobe. Usually smaller. Often abandoned. But the cool thing about them is the original mud (adobe) is still standing.

If you go to Chaco Canyon you see the original adobe too. Of course most of it worn away from 1000 years. But you can still touch the original adobe in the parts that are standing.
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Old 08-09-2019, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,022 posts, read 1,993,955 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
By the way the house in that Adonio video is a beautiful example of a pueblo style house that you find all over New Mexico. Flat roof. The chile hanging. The little wooden ladders. Those houses sell for a lot of money now. I'm sure he built it himself many years ago.

Nowadays you still seeing original examples of those houses scattered around the state. Original adobe. Usually smaller. Often abandoned. But the cool thing about them is the original mud (adobe) is still standing.

If you go to Chaco Canyon you see the original adobe too. Of course most of it worn away from 1000 years. But you can still touch the original adobe in the parts that are standing.
I´m also hype to check out the cuisine. For the sake of my health, I´m more keen to regularly eat simple "immigrant" tacos...corn tortilla, protein, onions, cilantro, ají, lime...too many heavy sauces and all that cheese can´t be good for you, and unfortunately that seems to be the Americanized take on Mexican food, Tex-Mex if you will. Even fajitas in restaurants are too greasy if you ask me. Lard is the hidden threat of most of all that cuisine...better to make it at home like we do (using healthy oils, yogurt instead of lard in tamal masa, tortillas de avena, etc).

That being said, I´d like to try blue corn enchiladas in chile sauce (red, green, doesn´t matter), carne adovada, Navajo tacos, calabacitas, the whole nine. Did I miss anything?

You spoke about a more cosmopolitan version of Spanish...that´s kind of what I´m striving for when I go back to the States. I´m not saying I need to sound like a news reporter, but I want to be well-understood by all and at least be able to activate a linguistic register that doesn´t turn to colloquialisms. My career might depend on it. What people hear with anyone´s accent is of course going to depend on many factors...it´s often all very relative. Someone from this region often focuses on the "not from around here" aspects of how I talk. If I´m in Bogotá the first thing out of most people´s mouths is how Paisa I sound. If I´m speaking to Hispanics from other nationalities...you guessed it...they comment on how Colombian I sound. Everyone´s ears are trained to hear different things, and it can go from specific to general, and will listen to certain things and pass others up.

I dated a girl who lives in Miami but grew up in Manizales, and boy could she switch it up depending on who she talked to. There was the universal Miami register (which didn´t sound Cuban, it just sounded more neutral) and then when she´d call her family back home, ave maria puesh, it was pure Paisa again.

80skeys would you say your Colombian background and travels affect how you speak more, or your Mexican heritage and where you´ve lived have a bigger impact?
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Old 08-09-2019, 09:23 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,087 posts, read 9,602,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
I´m also hype to check out the cuisine.
The food in New Mexico is kinda distinct from Mexican food although there are similarities. NM has its own type of chile. Personally speaking, I like NM chile way more than the types of chiles that Mexican cuisine uses. A roasted NM chile I can pretty much eat by itself - slap it into a flour tortilla and it's pretty much a meal in itself.
You'll definitely find some lardy food, but you'll also find some decent food. The enchilada is prepared differently. The NM huevos rancheros is totally different than the MX version. The NM version is a favorite of mine. It's way more flavorful than the MX version. Blue corn enchiladas are fantastic. My parents are always getting carne adovada from their neighborhood butcher. It tastes good, but it's too much meat in my opinion.

Quote:
You spoke about a more cosmopolitan version of Spanish...that´s kind of what I´m striving for when I go back to the States. I´m not saying I need to sound like a news reporter, but I want to be well-understood by all
I consider your goal an excellent all-around goal because it means you can communicate effectively with anybody, be it a Cuban-American in Florida, or a Mexican in California.

Quote:
I dated a girl who lives in Miami but grew up in Manizales, and boy could she switch it up depending on who she talked to. There was the universal Miami register (which didn´t sound Cuban, it just sounded more neutral) and then when she´d call her family back home, ave maria puesh, it was pure Paisa again.
Years ago I made an effort to get rid of the barrio accent, and I was successful in doing so, but when I find myself back in NM it comes right back out again.
Quote:
80skeys would you say your Colombian background and travels affect how you speak more, or your Mexican heritage and where you´ve lived have a bigger impact?
Mexican has had a bigger impact on me because it was the most prevalent when I was growing up. These days I interact more with the Colombian side of the family because there simply isn't anybody left on my dad's side of the family. Although he has a crap-ton of cousins, he never was close with them and most of them I don't know who they are, so those interactions that I had when I was growing up are no longer there.
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Old 08-10-2019, 12:10 PM
Status: "El Paso in our thoughts and prayers" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Canada
4,954 posts, read 4,519,246 times
Reputation: 3326
Did "Breaking Bad" bring in a lot of tourism to NM?
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Old 08-10-2019, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,087 posts, read 9,602,568 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Did "Breaking Bad" bring in a lot of tourism to NM?
No idea. Nobody I know ever mentioned anything about it. I've actually never seen the show.
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Old 08-11-2019, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,087 posts, read 9,602,568 times
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A conversation in another thread (NM forum) triggered my memory of something the kids in New Mexico would do back in the day at Christmas time. They would go trick or treating and would sing the following chant when someone opened the door:


Mis Crismes, mis Crismes
angelitos somos
del cielo venimos
y si no nos dan regalitos
puertas y ventanas
quebraremos!
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Old 08-14-2019, 07:24 AM
 
24,404 posts, read 17,838,188 times
Reputation: 9242
Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
I´m also hype to check out the cuisine. For the sake of my health, I´m more keen to regularly eat simple "immigrant" tacos...corn tortilla, protein, onions, cilantro, ají, lime...too many heavy sauces and all that cheese can´t be good for you, and unfortunately that seems to be the Americanized take on Mexican food, Tex-Mex if you will. Even fajitas in restaurants are too greasy if you ask me. Lard is the hidden threat of most of all that cuisine...better to make it at home like we do (using healthy oils, yogurt instead of lard in tamal masa, tortillas de avena, etc).

That being said, I´d like to try blue corn enchiladas in chile sauce (red, green, doesn´t matter), carne adovada, Navajo tacos, calabacitas, the whole nine. Did I miss anything?

You spoke about a more cosmopolitan version of Spanish...that´s kind of what I´m striving for when I go back to the States. I´m not saying I need to sound like a news reporter, but I want to be well-understood by all and at least be able to activate a linguistic register that doesn´t turn to colloquialisms. My career might depend on it. What people hear with anyone´s accent is of course going to depend on many factors...it´s often all very relative. Someone from this region often focuses on the "not from around here" aspects of how I talk. If I´m in Bogotá the first thing out of most people´s mouths is how Paisa I sound. If I´m speaking to Hispanics from other nationalities...you guessed it...they comment on how Colombian I sound. Everyone´s ears are trained to hear different things, and it can go from specific to general, and will listen to certain things and pass others up.

I dated a girl who lives in Miami but grew up in Manizales, and boy could she switch it up depending on who she talked to. There was the universal Miami register (which didn´t sound Cuban, it just sounded more neutral) and then when she´d call her family back home, ave maria puesh, it was pure Paisa again.

80skeys would you say your Colombian background and travels affect how you speak more, or your Mexican heritage and where you´ve lived have a bigger impact?
Spanish is very regional and collaqualism are ALWAYS a very important part of the language, even in Spain itself where each region has a very different dialect if not LANGUAGE.
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Old 08-14-2019, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,022 posts, read 1,993,955 times
Reputation: 1069
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyWriterdude View Post
Spanish is very regional and collaqualism are ALWAYS a very important part of the language, even in Spain itself where each region has a very different dialect if not LANGUAGE.
If you turn on news broadcasts, you hear a certain register of the language that strives to be universally understood, and uses an accent (or lack thereof) and vocabulary that reaches as many audiences as possible. That´s what I´m talking about.

If I´m shooting the s--- with people over some beers I don´t care how colloquial I sound, assuming they still understand me. If I´m giving a speech to Hispanic parents at Open House at school, you think I´m going to say, "Qué hubo puesh, cucho?!"? No, of course not.

Regionalisms, slang, etc. have their very imporant place in society...but so does the professional, neutral register. I haven´t had to use Spanish very much in my professional life, so I need to get with it and get that "news reporter talk" down.
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Old 08-14-2019, 03:52 PM
 
5,486 posts, read 8,151,718 times
Reputation: 4317
The RAE, based in Madrid and has a chapter in every country where Spanish is the official language and/or spoken by an important percentage of the people (ie. USA) has said on multiple occasions that every Spanish dialect in the Old World and in the New World is correct. Unlike most other languages, Spanish is one of the few that is actually 'govern' by a central governing body, in this case the RAE. It does takes suggestions from Spanish American countries (to name a region of the world) on the basis that the language is reflected by the people that speak it, but the final decision is made in Madrid.

Anyone that tries to say that there is a more 'correct' way of Spanish is either ignorant that all Spanish is correct or is outright lying. Obviously there are some dialects that some people may like and other they don't like, but all dialects are correct.
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Old 08-14-2019, 04:11 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,022 posts, read 1,993,955 times
Reputation: 1069
Quote:
Originally Posted by AntonioR View Post
The RAE, based in Madrid and has a chapter in every country where Spanish is the official language and/or spoken by an important percentage of the people (ie. USA) has said on multiple occasions that every Spanish dialect in the Old World and in the New World is correct. Unlike most other languages, Spanish is one of the few that is actually 'govern' by a central governing body, in this case the RAE. It does takes suggestions from Spanish American countries (to name a region of the world) on the basis that the language is reflected by the people that speak it, but the final decision is made in Madrid.

Anyone that tries to say that there is a more 'correct' way of Spanish is either ignorant that all Spanish is correct or is outright lying. Obviously there are some dialects that some people may like and other they don't like, but all dialects are correct.
100%...but there are dialects that are more universally understood than others. A lot of it has to do with TV and what programs are transmitted in other countries, which of course will tune people´s ears toward them. I haven´t spent a lot of time in México, but thanks to the Simpsons dubbed in their variety of Spanish, La Rose de Guadalupe, etc. I really have no problem understanding them.

Telemark is a chain of call centers which handles customer service and sales calls all over the Spanish-speaking world. I know Movistar outsources them to handle a lot of their calls to customers in Spain, and guess where those centers are based? Colombia and Perú. There´s a reason why those call centers aren´t in, say, Chile or Cuba. Nothing wrong with those accents, but they´re simply less understood across the world.
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