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Old 08-26-2019, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,226 posts, read 9,672,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
I have heard people from several countries use the word "pesos" despite their local currencies being called something else.
This must be one of those universally ingrained spanish words.
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Old 08-26-2019, 11:16 AM
Status: "Life goes on..." (set 13 days ago)
 
5,547 posts, read 8,211,196 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
I have heard people from several countries use the word "pesos" despite their local currencies being called something else.
They do that in many places. In Puerto Rico they say pesos to the US dollar. When people are quoting any price, its always peso this, peso that.

In many other countries the peso is still the national currency. A perfect example is the Dominican Republic where the legal tender is the Dominican peso. Even Dominicans that lived for decades in the USA will call the US dollar as peso too. I'm sure they change the legal tender to something else and the people will continue to call it a peso, and talk of peso this and peso that.
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Old 08-26-2019, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,226 posts, read 9,672,070 times
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What's the origin of the word "peso"? How far back in history does it go?
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Old 08-27-2019, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
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AAB: you got me on a kick of hunting for unique things in northern NM dialogue. I found another clip:
It's kinda long and a little boring, but your students might find it interesting, particularly if you have students who come from rural parts of Colombia they will be able to identify with the people in this video. There used to be a lot of sheepherding in northern NM and southern CO. This video talks about that and shows a lot of outdoors scenes from that area. There's a lot of English, but there's also a fair amount of Spanish scattered throughout.

I made a couple notes for you on the dialogue. Towards the beginning there's a word I'm sure you've never heard: talegas. It means balls (testicles). Later in the second half the sheepherder says "lo vide". Instead of saying "lo vi" (I saw), everyone up there would say "lo vide".

They'd also conjugate certain verbs slightly differently, like "oites" (instead of oiste). And, although not in this video, there's a lot of examples of words, particularly nouns, derived from Nahuatl (the Aztec language) instead of having any Spanish base.

I'll be visiting NM soon, I'm going to make a point of going to a couple places to see if I can dig up more audio recordings.
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Old 09-04-2019, 10:06 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,226 posts, read 9,672,070 times
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In Albuquerque this week. Went to buy some roasted chile in the barrio. New Mexico Spanish still alive. The older folks running the shop were speaking it. Chatted with them for a bit.

aab: I've already got some more audio recordings for you. Recorded in the 1970s. Very interesting stuff. Will post them here sometime this week.
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Old 09-04-2019, 11:10 AM
 
Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina
742 posts, read 698,583 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
There is basically a proper spanish as there is a proper English. Meaning, there is a universal grammar and a standard vocabulary that is internationally understood and agreed upon. These are the "neutral" languages that you hear on news programs and which politicans and public speakers use.
No, there isn't.
What is the neutral way to say 'you are'?? (both singular and plural)
What is the neutral or standard way to say 'apricot', 'peach', 'computer' or 'hotdog' in Spanish??

Whereas virtually everyone will understand the various possible conjugations used in different Spanish speaking areas, it can get much more complicated when vocabulary is involved. Again, it doesn’t mean that people won’t understand, as one ends up learning a lot of terms used in other countries, but none of them is necessarily above the others to work as the universal standard form.

As a curiosity, all the Wiki articles about animals in Spanish are listed by their scientific name due to the immense amount of different names which are standard in every country, and the lack of agreement on which one should prevail.
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Old 09-04-2019, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
1,039 posts, read 2,009,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
In Albuquerque this week. Went to buy some roasted chile in the barrio. New Mexico Spanish still alive. The older folks running the shop were speaking it. Chatted with them for a bit.

aab: I've already got some more audio recordings for you. Recorded in the 1970s. Very interesting stuff. Will post them here sometime this week.
Wouldn´t you know it, today we got to the New Spain era of U.S. History. I played them a bit of the radio broadcast you shared with me, and we really focused on Don Andonio and I asked them what their ears picked up...a lot of kids said Cuba/Puerto Rico/Colombia´s Caribbean Coast, another said he heard some Mexican influence...one said Argentinian, but I don´t really hear that.

They also noted how he seems to throw the words together and conjugate them in a very "non-native" way. I guess it´s that he´s been speaking English so long that he kind of halfway thinks in it...OR the grammar is just so different in that archaic dialect....I´m not sure.

I´m happy to hear that you were able to see the language alive and well in NM.
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Old 09-04-2019, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,226 posts, read 9,672,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mhc1985 View Post
No, there isn't.
Yes, there is. I watch Argentine movies and understand them (with the exception of some slang). Take a listen to the following clip - is there anything you don't understand? You'll be hard pressed to find two totally different dialects - Argentine and northern New Mexican - but they are mutually intelligible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
I asked them what their ears picked up...a lot of kids said Cuba/Puerto Rico/Colombia´s Caribbean Coast,
That's suprising to me. Honestly that Adonio guy talks kinda weird. Let's take a listen to more clips from different people around the state and gather our impressions.


I haven't had time to sort through the clips, but let's kick this off:

The following was recorded in 1971, it's an old lady from Peña Blanca, NM. You'll notice she mentions "Cuba" - which means the town of Cuba, New Mexico.

https://vocaroo.com/i/s1AQl3ECJceq

Last edited by 80skeys; 09-04-2019 at 03:22 PM..
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Old 09-04-2019, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,226 posts, read 9,672,070 times
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Here's another one. This guy is from San Jose NM (between Santa Fe and Las Vegas NM). Recorded 1971. This guy is telling some old tales in both these clips.

https://vocaroo.com/i/s0IyK1QrzjTI


https://vocaroo.com/i/s1zLHWGnFfyr

Last edited by 80skeys; 09-04-2019 at 03:36 PM..
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Old 09-04-2019, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,226 posts, read 9,672,070 times
Reputation: 3251
aab: here's another one. you might find this one more interesting as he's talking about local history, including a shootout between Democrats and Republicans:


https://vocaroo.com/i/s0zfNUPGwyVg
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