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Old 07-22-2019, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,988 posts, read 9,549,835 times
Reputation: 3083

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Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
they said, "Yeah, I got the hook up" talking about getting hooked up with a venue for a party or something. When the subtitles said, "Me dieron el contacto"
That's a reasonable translation. Was there something in the context that made it not the right translation?

Quote:
I think what´s most important is whatever people are willing to do and devote real time to. Music and the news in Spanish do it for me more than movies, but movies might even be better tools for teaching.
I think the problem with music (not to say it doesn't work for you) is that it can be poetic, and so it's not necessary going to flow the way a normal conversation will. But this depends on the artist. The News is definitely pretty "normal" dialogue (although it kinda has it's own stylized structure and vocabulary.)

I met a guy from India one time in an airport. I was standing at the counter asking a question, and he came up to ask a question, which he did, in good Spanish. So I asked him how it was he spoke Spanish and he told he had moved from India to Central America 15 years ago for business. He said he never took any classes or any kind of training in Spanish, he just picked it up "on the street", as it were. Just learned it by interacting with people.

Of course, those people have to be willing to interact with you in the early stages. In his case, since he was running some kind of business, neither he nor they would have had any choice - they would have found it necessary to speak with eachother regardless of his level of mastery of the language.

But, if I recall, in your case you have had issues with Latin people not wanting to talk to you in Spanish because they assume you don't know it or something... which sucks and honestly I'm kinda ashamed people do that.
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Old 07-23-2019, 01:39 PM
 
208 posts, read 299,720 times
Reputation: 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamer2019 View Post
I have a Salvadorian accent for some words but for others I have a Puerto Rican accent and that's probably due to living in Long Island even though the majority of Hispanics there were Salvadorians. I noticed some words I don't pronounce R's and replace them with L's. I only noticed this after my mom points it out. At the same time I don't even speak the Spanish language well so I use Spanglish and also end up making up words like Jennifer Lopez sometimes does. I went to El Salvador and they told me they can tell I'm not from there and that I sound American.
No to be mean, but my gosh, it is rough reading your posts. As far as *Salvadoran accents go, I can only suggest you immerse yourself around Central Americans. Hondurans and Nicaraguans share very similar accents in the same way Caribbean Spanish is related. They're not identical, but they do overlap. So that may help.

I dont know why anyone would want to learn a Central American accent. They speak Voseo a lot, but that accent is rough on the ears sometimes. Its cringy when I hear older Hondurans and Salvadorans speak.
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Old 07-23-2019, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Kaliforneea
1,287 posts, read 962,763 times
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setting aside the recent posts if the OP is legit or not,

if you want to learn/immerse yourself in the Salvadoran accent, move to Van Nuys, California. Together with Pico-Union, it home to the second-largest concentration of Salvis outside of the city of San Salvador. You can eat pupusas and drink Refrescos. I have noticed that Salvadorean style chorizo (diff than mexican or spanish) has become a regular product in the deli case even at mainstream/white grocery stores.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvad...in_Los_Angeles

source: I had a Salvadoran ex gf
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Old 07-23-2019, 02:34 PM
 
52 posts, read 11,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SUPbud View Post
setting aside the recent posts if the OP is legit or not,

if you want to learn/immerse yourself in the Salvadoran accent, move to Van Nuys, California. Together with Pico-Union, it home to the second-largest concentration of Salvis outside of the city of San Salvador. You can eat pupusas and drink Refrescos. I have noticed that Salvadorean style chorizo (diff than mexican or spanish) has become a regular product in the deli case even at mainstream/white grocery stores.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvad...in_Los_Angeles

source: I had a Salvadoran ex gf

I used to live in Long Island, NY that has the 3rd highest Salvadorian population and still didn't have a complete Salvadorian accent or close to one. I guess I was just wondering if they made like audiobooks where someone can actually learn Spanish but with a Salvadorian accent.
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Old 07-23-2019, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
990 posts, read 1,980,389 times
Reputation: 1046
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scientific View Post
No to be mean, but my gosh, it is rough reading your posts. As far as *Salvadoran accents go, I can only suggest you immerse yourself around Central Americans. Hondurans and Nicaraguans share very similar accents in the same way Caribbean Spanish is related. They're not identical, but they do overlap. So that may help.

I dont know why anyone would want to learn a Central American accent. They speak Voseo a lot, but that accent is rough on the ears sometimes. Its cringy when I hear older Hondurans and Salvadorans speak.
It's all I matter of opinion, but I like the Salvadoran accent just fine.

I wouldn't put down Central America at all...I particularly like Costa Rican and Guatemalan accents...very universally understood.
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Old 07-24-2019, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,988 posts, read 9,549,835 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SUPbud View Post
if you want to learn/immerse yourself in [any language], move to [where it is spoken]

This truly is the best method by far. It's also the least lazy. El que no se arriesga no pasa la mar.
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Old 07-24-2019, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,988 posts, read 9,549,835 times
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I think it's obvious to most people: accent wise you pretty much have to be exposed to it as a kid. Once you're beyond a certain age you're not going to be able acquire it.

There's lots of Chicano people here in the U.S. who cannot understand or speak Spanish. Yet if you ask them to pronounce a Spanish word they will speak it exactly as a Mexican or any native speaker would pronounce it - with a 100% proper accent. If a Spaniard or South American or Mexican heard them pronouncing some words in Spanish they will assume they're a native speaker.

Why is this? It's because of the exposure to the environment where the accent is being heard regularly. Believe it or not there are even non-Hispanic people who are raised in the barrio, they don't understand spanish but if you ask them to prounounce some words their pronounciation is 100x better than gringos who have learned Spanish as a second language.
Again this is simply a matter of exposure to where you're hearing the accent on a daily basis.
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Old 07-24-2019, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,988 posts, read 9,549,835 times
Reputation: 3083
Going back to a good point that aab brought up. Translation is often not a matter of direct translation but a matter of getting the construction of a sentence the way that a native speaker would impart the particular idea. This why you need to learn from native speakers. Case in point: sometimes when I'm reading books in Spanish, I can tell when the writer is an American or Brit because, although the sentences and grammar is "technically" correct and it's understandable, it sounds odd because it's not the way that one would normally express the idea that is being expressed. It's like the author is trying to force an "English" way of talking onto Spanish structure. In these cases there's a much easier and more natural equivalent in Spanish which is kind of like organizing the "ideas" rather than trying to adhere to certain words.
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Old 07-24-2019, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,827 posts, read 4,476,762 times
Reputation: 3276
Salvadorean accents are terrible. They pronounce the letters "S" like"J". For Example..

-De donde eres?

-joy de jan jalvador loco, y voj?

- A la **** loco, yo tambien, joy puro jalvatrucho

-de que parte loco?

- de jan jalvador , y voj jerote?

- de joyapango, jimon loco......



It is so annoying.

Half of the slang salvadoreans use comes from Mexico. Esta chido loco, simon loco etc etc etc.....
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Old 07-24-2019, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Canada
4,827 posts, read 4,476,762 times
Reputation: 3276
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scientific View Post

I dont know why anyone would want to learn a Central American accent. They speak Voseo a lot, but that accent is rough on the ears sometimes. Its cringy when I hear older Hondurans and Salvadorans speak.
Central American accent? There is no such thing, unless you are just talking about el salvador and Honduras who are the only ones that sound the same. Nicaraguans also talk similar but it is different. Guatemalans talk way different, so do Costa Ricans, and then Again Panama is way different. So there is no such thing as central American spanish. They all talk different.
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