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Old 08-05-2019, 05:04 AM
 
Location: Outside US
1,314 posts, read 519,937 times
Reputation: 1704

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cid911 View Post
why are you even paying attention to this guy, cant you see he is salvadorian and he speaks spanish he is a troll always asking stupid questions, he changes accounts too.

Thanks, missed it.
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Old 08-05-2019, 09:24 AM
Status: "El Paso in our thoughts and prayers" (set 6 hours ago)
 
Location: Canada
4,855 posts, read 4,480,375 times
Reputation: 3281
Yeah the guy is a troll. he comes on here and asks questions about el salvador he himself is Salvadorean. He often bashes Mexicans and seems to have a love of puerto ricans, dominicans and reggaeton. Sadly I have noticed salvadoreans living on the east coast of US seems to suffer from insecurity about their own identity and/or have a complete lack of knowledge about their identity. I have seen this so many times. I have seen salvadorean with corn rows on his head and talk like dominicans and call themselves "tigueres".
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Old Yesterday, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,014 posts, read 9,556,645 times
Reputation: 3101
aab7855: How are your El Paso plans coming along? If and/when you make it there, you might go up to Albuquerque which has the largest (or maybe only) National Hispanic Cultural Center in the country. Between them and some state offices in Santa Fe, there is tons of historical information, archives and books on Hispanic culture. There's stuff you can't find anywhere else, including books dating back to the times of the conquistadores. I believe your career is in education, so you might find it interesting.
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Old Yesterday, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
997 posts, read 1,982,351 times
Reputation: 1046
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80skeys View Post
aab7855: How are your El Paso plans coming along? If and/when you make it there, you might go up to Albuquerque which has the largest (or maybe only) National Hispanic Cultural Center in the country. Between them and some state offices in Santa Fe, there is tons of historical information, archives and books on Hispanic culture. There's stuff you can't find anywhere else, including books dating back to the times of the conquistadores. I believe your career is in education, so you might find it interesting.
That does sound interesting. Regardless of where we end up, I intend to visit NM quite often to go skiing and see the unique culture of places like Santa Fe and Taos.

We can´t move back until June 2020, since it may very well take that long for the Green Card to be ready, and my life goes in school years (we just started another one, and I won´t leave in the middle of the year). I could go on a long tangent about how long, inefficient and ridiculous the Green Card process is, but it would be pretty insensitive to those who are waiting TEN YEARS for one of their siblings or their parents to join them in the US. 18 months for my wife is long, but not as long as most have to wait. Nor is my family enduring the trauma of forced separation

But I have to ask, do the original Spanish-descended New Mexicans really still speak it? I show this video to my students, I thought it was pretty cool...I don´t know how many of these people have passed this dialect on to the next generations:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdAGJz4NvAg

There is a similar community of Isleños who live in the rural outskirts of New Orleans, but as you can see here, even the local president of the association now struggles with the language. My family is part Canario actually, but they all changed their last names to French-sounding ones when they intermarried with the Cajuns. Dominguez became Domingue, Maya became Mayard, etc.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45UhVfXlFG0

Fun fact...the journalist interviewing everyone now lives in Bogotá and she and her husband are good friends of ours, lovely people.

I can´t imagine ABQ, LC or Santa Fe have the percentage of foreign-born Hispanics that Texas cities do, though you´d certainly be able to correct me if I´m wrong.

Cheers.

Last edited by aab7855; Yesterday at 08:16 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 08:48 AM
Status: "El Paso in our thoughts and prayers" (set 6 hours ago)
 
Location: Canada
4,855 posts, read 4,480,375 times
Reputation: 3281
Man Louisiana is a really diverse place. So much history and cultures in one spot.
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Old Yesterday, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,014 posts, read 9,556,645 times
Reputation: 3101
Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
That does sound interesting. Regardless of where we end up, I intend to visit NM quite often to go skiing and see the unique culture of places like Santa Fe and Taos.
- I highly recommend Taos Ski Valley. Widely considered one of the best mountains in the country.

Culture-wise, you'll find NM very interesting. No place like it in the rest of the country.

- The Green card process is even worse nowadays since Trump took office.
- To answer your question: anybody born before the 1970s in Northern New Mexico is fluent in Spanish as spoken by the guy in your video. For those born after, a few of them can, but most of them cannot. Those people are from northern NM - campesinos, montañeros. Basically pastoral mountain people. "Borregero" is probably a word you hadn't heard before seeing that video, am I right? Colombians dont' use it. Probably nobody uses it except for old-timers in small villages in northern Mexico and NM. Their culture was a bit different than Albuquerque which is more Mexican influenced. In Albuquerque and to the south you'll find a lot of people who speak garden-variety Mexican spanish.

Quote:
There is a similar community of Isleños who live in the rural outskirts of New Orleans, but as
- Interesting video. I had never heard of the Isleños. Weird costumes - almost Shakespeare British or something, I wonder where on earth those come from?? A few of the people interviewed spoke with a kind of French or Cajun accent. Not suprising, but interesting to hear. I had never heard that combination of accents before. It was cool. Like you said a couple of them didn't speak Spanish super well, but still they spoke it better than our "Arturito" from the El Paso video (the police guy .... he reminds me of "Arturito" from Casa de Papel.) In your Louisiana vid, the others interviewed obviously were from Spain.

- When you mentioned Isleños my first thought was thinking "Isleta" which is an Indian reservation in NM but obviously they're totally unrelated things. Some of the Isleta Indians actually migrated a few hundred years ago to the south during the Pueblo Revolt, and so nowadays you find native Americans in El Paso and Juarez who actually are blood brothers of the Isleta in Albuquerque. The ones down south kinda consider themselves a "lost" tribe. They feel their proper roots are up in Albq.

- I think Louisiana must have been a big melting pot. It surely must have been under Spanish rule at one point. And obviously under French rule. It's pretty sad how these things die out, but I guess that's life.

Quote:
Fun fact...the journalist interviewing everyone now lives in Bogotá and she and her husband are good friends of ours, lovely people.
Cool. I take it she was partly raised in the U.S.?

Quote:
I can´t imagine ABQ, LC or Santa Fe have the percentage of foreign-born Hispanics that Texas cities do, though you´d certainly be able to correct me if I´m wrong.
in New Mexico you find a lot of people who were born in Mexico. But due to the poor economy, not as much as TX or CA or Chicago.
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Old Yesterday, 02:31 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
6,014 posts, read 9,556,645 times
Reputation: 3101
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Man Louisiana is a really diverse place. So much history and cultures in one spot.
No doubt, man.
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Old Yesterday, 09:42 PM
 
214 posts, read 300,062 times
Reputation: 209
Quote:
Originally Posted by UrbanLuis View Post
Yeah the guy is a troll. he comes on here and asks questions about el salvador he himself is Salvadorean. He often bashes Mexicans and seems to have a love of puerto ricans, dominicans and reggaeton. Sadly I have noticed salvadoreans living on the east coast of US seems to suffer from insecurity about their own identity and/or have a complete lack of knowledge about their identity. I have seen this so many times. I have seen salvadorean with corn rows on his head and talk like dominicans and call themselves "tigueres".
Veering a bit off topic. I have no qualms with Salvis and Hondurans from Queens and Long Island acting like typical Latin New Yorkers. I dont understand why some people have issues with that. There is no such thing as one identity when it comes to Latinos who grow up in the states. In New York you'll see Peruvians, Colombians and Ecuadorans all doing the same thing. If they dressed like cholos, would the optics be better to you? Had they adopted more of the New York way, I doubt they'd have the SoCal gang culture swallow up their identity.

Also, Guatemalans, Hondurans and Salvadorans, don't have real influence in music, fashion or arts. I know that may rub some of them the wrong way, but almost all the music they listen to is from Mexico or the Caribbean.

As this has been discussed in the past, you're a product of your environment. I grew up in Texas, and Cali Mexicans that move there can sometimes be critical of their cousins from Dallas or Houston- speaking in a Southern urban accent sounds too black to them. I grew up with plenty of Mexican kids that didnt speak a lick of Spanish and their musical preference was Southern rap. Culturally, Jose Lopez from Oak Cliff Dallas who is Mexican may have more in common with Jose Lopez from Spanish Harlem who is Puerto Rican, putting aside their Latin American origins.

Last edited by Scientific; Yesterday at 10:00 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 10:54 PM
Status: "El Paso in our thoughts and prayers" (set 6 hours ago)
 
Location: Canada
4,855 posts, read 4,480,375 times
Reputation: 3281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scientific View Post
Veering a bit off topic. I have no qualms with Salvis and Hondurans from Queens and Long Island acting like typical Latin New Yorkers. I dont understand why some people have issues with that. There is no such thing as one identity when it comes to Latinos who grow up in the states. In New York you'll see Peruvians, Colombians and Ecuadorans all doing the same thing.
.
Sure that's fine but there is no need to bash Mexicans. Culturally speaking Salvadoreans are much closer to Mexicans. Salvadoreans are part of the Mesoamerican area.


Quote:
If they dressed like cholos, would the optics be better to you?
WTF? Is that what you think of when you think of Mexicans and Salvadoreans?
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Old Yesterday, 10:57 PM
Status: "El Paso in our thoughts and prayers" (set 6 hours ago)
 
Location: Canada
4,855 posts, read 4,480,375 times
Reputation: 3281
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scientific View Post
Veering a bit off topic. I have no qualms with Salvis and Hondurans from Queens and Long Island acting like typical Latin New Yorkers. I dont understand why some people have issues with that. There is no such thing as one identity when it comes to Latinos who grow up in the states. .
You contradict yourself, but what ever rocks your boat.
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