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Old 07-15-2019, 03:57 PM
 
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but Salvadorian spanish with the accent and the slang from home living in the US?
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Old 07-15-2019, 06:03 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 5 days ago)
 
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The best way is to sign up for a Spanish language school in Latin America or in Spain. Mexico City, Bogota, Lima, Buenos Aires, Madrid, and Barcelona are the major places people go to learn Spanish. You are also forced to speak the language beyond the school in those places. The accent will be different, but remember that the Spanish language doesn't have a right or a wrong accent. All are legitimate.

The Real Academia de la Lengua Española (RAE) has a chapter in every Spanish American country (even the USA has one). While the main decisions are made in the chapter in Madrid, which is the main one, they do take plenty of advice from all their chapters in America. Unlike most languages, Spanish is regulated by the RAE.
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Old 07-15-2019, 06:11 PM
Status: "Thinking of the future..." (set 5 days ago)
 
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This is the RAE main website: Real Academia Española
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Old 07-16-2019, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Pereira, Colombia
981 posts, read 1,971,073 times
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I´ll tell you how I did it...nothing is perfect and there are probably many other ways to go about this, but I can only share what I did and have you tweak it to how you live your life.

To start from scratch, software/applications are absolutely the best way to go. There is a certain self-imposed helplessness that many language students get into, and it can be fatal. So much of the process can be independently maneuvered with the right effort and tips to go along the way. Don´t wait for a native professor to teach everything to you...go out and get it first, then seek help later. If you can´t put in 1+ hour a day (and honestly 2-3 is better) of solo study, things are going to stall out for you and just like fad diets and New Year´s resolutions, you´ll forget all about it and the initial effort will be fruitless.

I took the plunge and bought Rosetta Stone, though I hear that the free app Duo Lingo is just as good if not better...I can´t give you a real timeline for how this first part is going to take, because everyone learns at a different pace...but you absolutely have to do this first to cover a lot of ground in a decent amount of time. Since I´m not familiar with Duo Lingo and its levels, I have to coach you using Rosetta Stone...study Levels 1 and 2 before you think about calling a tutor in your neighborhood or taking that trip overseas. If you live in the US and El Salvador interests you, buy the Latin American version of the software, not the Spain version...no-brainer. As you go through the app, you need three things by your side at all times: 1.) Stacks and stacks of notecards. Anything and everything you didn´t know before you saw it in the lesson, write it down. Not sure of how it translates exactly? See item #2...; 2.) Google Translate ready to enter any of the text you see which isn´t 110% crystal clear in what its English equivalent is. At this level of basic, neutral, textbook-ish Spanish, you´re unlikely to get a bad translation. Trust it, and if you still have doubts about how the rules work with the phrase, or what the context/meaning is use item #3...; 3.) A notebook where you continue to write detailed questions that software and Google Translate simply can´t answer. Languages are complex, and down the line you will need a native speaker to clarify your doubts. Believe me, even after finishing Level 1, you´ll have plenty of questions scribbled down in that notebook of yours.

It´s up to you how you distribute your time, but I´d say for every hour you´re writing things down using the software, you should be spending 2 hours studying, reviewing, quizzing yourself by flipping those notecards, etc. After you complete Level 1 you should be trying to practice with people. I´m not sure where you live in the States, but it´s unlikely that you wouldn´t be able to find opportunities to practice. You will get shut down and people will answer you in English. You will get weird looks by people who are totally off put and confused by who you are and what you´re doing. You will have people not understand a word you´re saying. Keep trying...you´ll get more opportunities with people who don´t know enough English to rebuff you...think construction workers at taquerías and places like that...this is a crucial yet awkward stage where you´re walking into places, exchanging pleasantries, ordering food...and all of this is just saying rehearsed words and hoping to be understood. If people allow you the opportunity to practice with them, expect to be asked/told things you don´t understand, and to feel frustrated because of it. It´s part of the process. Grow a thick skin now...you´ll need it.

Also during this time (ending Level 1 and moving into Level 2) you need to add several more hours a week of media immersion. Do you have any Spanish language networks in your community? Univision, Telemundo, Azteca, etc are common names. Start watching the news every night if you can...newscasters have to speak clearly, without colloquialisms and slang, at a natural native speed but not super-fast. Keep that notebook at your side the whole time...new words will be popping up constantly in captions and other visual aids during the newscast...as you look them up on Translate, you figure out which words you needed to know yesterday and you add them to your stack of notecards...and which ones can wait. Music is one of the best ways to fall in love with a language. On this very forum we have a thread with hundreds of rock/pop/salsa/hip-hop songs from Latin America...start listening and find the ones whose melodies are satisfying to the ear. You don´t have a understand a single word of it at first, just find songs that you like...once you do that, then start looking up the lyrics and playing the songs at the same time to better tune your ear to listening in general to this new language.

Did you stick it out until you finished Level 2? Now go take that trip, live with a family for several weeks (your language school will hook it all up for you) and pay for PRIVATE classes with a NATIVE teacher. Don´t let other people slow you down or intimidate you...group classes do little to nothing to help YOU with what you need. Bring that notebook with you and start getting the explanations that only a native speaker can provide.

Later on you can make that pivot towards the Salvadorian variety of Spanish...there´s time for that. In these first steps I mentioned, you just need to focus on getting the basics down, and your untrained ear isn´t going to pick up on accents at first anyway. You just need to pound your head with the mechanics for a while, and once you´re able to flow and hold conversations with people, you can start to focus on different accents and trying to gravitate towards one over the other. Good luck! Don´t settle for anything less than 100% of your efforts!

Last edited by aab7855; 07-16-2019 at 03:57 PM..
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Old 07-17-2019, 11:17 AM
 
Location: not where you are
8,143 posts, read 7,655,940 times
Reputation: 6931
Quote:
Originally Posted by aab7855 View Post
I´ll tell you how I did it...nothing is perfect and there are probably many other ways to go about this, but I can only share what I did and have you tweak it to how you live your life.

To start from scratch, software/applications are absolutely the best way to go. There is a certain self-imposed helplessness that many language students get into, and it can be fatal. So much of the process can be independently maneuvered with the right effort and tips to go along the way. Don´t wait for a native professor to teach everything to you...go out and get it first, then seek help later. If you can´t put in 1+ hour a day (and honestly 2-3 is better) of solo study, things are going to stall out for you and just like fad diets and New Year´s resolutions, you´ll forget all about it and the initial effort will be fruitless.

I took the plunge and bought Rosetta Stone, though I hear that the free app Duo Lingo is just as good if not better...I can´t give you a real timeline for how this first part is going to take, because everyone learns at a different pace...w the rules work with the phrase, or what the context/meaning is use item #3...; 3.) A notebook where you continue to write detailed questions that software and Google Translate simply can´t answer. Languages are complex, and down the line you will need a native speaker to clarify your doubts. Believe me, even after finishing Level 1, you´ll have plenty of questions scribbled down in that notebook of yours.



!
Hey thanks for suggesting this app, I'm trying it out now and I have to say, I'm liking it a lot. Very cool, better than some other learning tools I've tried, I'm only on day one and will keep practicing and seeing how much I continue to learn and check back to give an update every so often.
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Old 07-17-2019, 12:06 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,888 posts, read 9,505,258 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamer2019 View Post
but Salvadorian spanish with the accent and the slang from home living in the US?
There's no way you're gonna get the accent unless you grew up with it. If you go and live in El Salvador you'll slowly start to lose your native accent but you're never gonna speak Spanish like a native Salvadoreño, people who hear you will always be able to tell.


That said, best way to learn spanish and to speak it fluently is to go live in a country where everyone speaks Spanish and nobody speaks English. You don't even have to leave the U.S. Move to the barrio in El Paso or Los Angeles or New York.
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Old 07-18-2019, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,888 posts, read 9,505,258 times
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I'll add a couple things.


If you can't move somewhere, an alternative is to start watching Youtube videos in Spanish. Not tutorials (and especially not tutorials by gringos), but videos by native speakers whose target audience is native speakers.


Start listening to those. Whenever you don't understand stuff, look it up. The advantage here is that spanish spells exactly how it sounds. Do this over and over until you start being able to figure it out. If you can't figure out the spelling of a word, record it and pipe it into an audio translator.


Another thougt is to watch Spanish TV with subtitles in English and rest Spanish language movies with subtitles. That's an excellent way to learn languages. I've known several people from different parts of the world who learned impressive English that way.
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Old 07-19-2019, 11:16 PM
 
104 posts, read 40,658 times
Reputation: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dreamer2019 View Post
but Salvadorian spanish with the accent and the slang from home living in the US?

well you can join mierda seca or join a migrant caravan, thats a good way to be introduce to their culture and slang you might even learn a few other things too.
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Old 07-20-2019, 07:36 AM
 
Location: not where you are
8,143 posts, read 7,655,940 times
Reputation: 6931
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRosa View Post
Hey thanks for suggesting this app, I'm trying it out now and I have to say, I'm liking it a lot. Very cool, better than some other learning tools I've tried, I'm only on day one and will keep practicing and seeing how much I continue to learn and check back to give an update every so often.

I said I would follow-up on how it's going with the Dilingo program, not great. Today I kept getting back "Wrong" for my answers to a couple of questions was wrong, this was driving nuts till I figured out my error. A sentence would be written out in Spanish with blank spaces to be filled in, but my dizzy self instead of writing the Spanish filler word in the blank I would keep writing the English word.

Ex. Yo como ______ = I would write bread in the blank instead of pan.

Tu ______ una ______ = I would fill in are + girl instead of eres + nina.



The correct word choices were right there, but I kept reversing, good thing at least I'm absorbing the translations

For the most part I Like the program, but I feel I will have to combine it with another, I need to get more immersed in conversational Spanish, I don' have a whole lot of time before my extended trip comes around. I want to be abe to have a half way decent conversation. I'm going to see if I can find a practice group or at least an individual in my area to practice with.
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Old 07-20-2019, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Sunnyvale, CA
5,888 posts, read 9,505,258 times
Reputation: 3007
Quote:
Originally Posted by TRosa View Post
instead of writing the Spanish filler word in the blank I would keep writing the English word.
You're learning to speak it how we speak it here in California. ;-) ... Lo vas a aprender bien how to mix the languages, chingón.

Seriously though rent yourself some Spanish movies with English subtitles. Like I said I've known people from different parts of the world who learned how to speak English just by doing that. Same thing will work for you with Spanish.
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