U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 04-18-2008, 04:10 PM
 
13,140 posts, read 36,744,606 times
Reputation: 12122

Advertisements

Never thought i'd see a south american country doing better than the USA as Brazil is booming. Anyway just wanted to post for those interested.

No recession here: Brazil's economy now in overdrive - El Paso Times
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-18-2008, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Tucson AZ & Leipzig, Germany
2,385 posts, read 7,768,104 times
Reputation: 3587
I've visited Brazil several times and traveled around many parts of the country by land. It is about the size of the continental US, and an amazing place to visit. Brazil still has a lot of social problems, but their economy is becoming a lot stronger because they are to food exports what the Saudis are to oil exports. That export money is getting plowed back into their domestic economy into other areas, and it has created an upward spiral of activity. Brazil is also the first large country that is not a oil export power to break itself from dependence on foreign oil imports. About 90 percent of all new cars sold in Brazil are flex fuel that can run on either of the two fuels sold for internal combustion engines: 100 percent sugar cane alcohol or a mix of 25 percent sugar cane alcohol and 75 percent gasoline. They also get nearly all of their domestic electricity from vast hydroelectric dams driven by large rivers fed by vast area that get high rainfall. They don't need to burn coal or imported natural gas or oil to create electricity. These two things combined means that they are not sending out a huge amount of their GDP to the middle east or Venezuela like the US and other big economies addicted to imported oil. Can you imagine the effect on the GDP of the USA if we could break our addiction to imported oil??

I'm going to Brazil for a visit in October, to Curitiba in the state of Parana, about 6 hours south of Sao Paulo by bus. It's a nice city of about 1.5 million on a 3000' elevation plateau with mild spring like weather year round and lots of trees and parks. It's a city with a great urban bus system where you don't need a car to get around town.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2008, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Des Moines, IA
1,744 posts, read 6,611,637 times
Reputation: 1207
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6/3 View Post
Never thought i'd see a south american country doing better than the USA

To say that Brazil is doing better than us is still quite a bit of an over-statement. Things are slumping here and things are booming down there, but we still haven't crossed paths.

Anyways, good for Brazil. It seems like we do automatically dismiss South America as being all third world which isn't true. Brazil has a large middle class and from what I understand, the Southern part of Brazil has a standard of living very similar to the rest of the developed Western world. When we think of Brazil, we usually think of rain forests and the slums of Rio De Janerio, but there's more to Brazil. Argentina, Uruguay and Chile are also developed (for the most part) countries.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-19-2008, 11:35 AM
 
Location: 77441
3,161 posts, read 3,828,257 times
Reputation: 2303
MY girlfriends family is spread out in the State of Sao Paulo, from Guaruja to Rio Preto. wonderful diverse country, the first time I visited I was totally amazed out how modern and wonderful the country is.
Most areas of Brasil are as modern as a lot of countries, such as canada. brasil is certainly not a 3rd world country in the sense most people are used to associating with.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2008, 01:29 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, which as I understand was once upon a time ago part of the United States of America
849 posts, read 783,805 times
Reputation: 314
Quote:
Originally Posted by recycled View Post
100 percent sugar cane alcohol or a mix of 25 percent sugar cane alcohol and 75 percent gasoline.
What are the prices like for those fuels in Brazil? I can only find recent data for petrol.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2008, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Tucson AZ & Leipzig, Germany
2,385 posts, read 7,768,104 times
Reputation: 3587
Regular gasoline in Brazil is actually gasohol, containing 76% gasoline and 24% cane alcohol. All cars in Brazil can run this 76-24 blend of gasahol because the temperatures in the country are generally warm year round everywhere. (In the US there is a 90-10 gas ethanol blend sold in many states). They don't sell 100 percent gasoline at most gas stations in Brazil. 76-24 blend regular octane gasohol sells for about $6 per gallon. 100% sugar alcohol (Alcool in Brazil) sells for about $3.50 per gallon. Note, the value of the dollar has fallen by 50 percent against the Brazil Real in recent years (a shocking fact in itself) so my calculations of Brazil Real to USD may be off a little bit. One thing to remember is that fuel economy with 100% Alcohol is about 20% less than gasohol, so it takes 20% more pure Alcohol to travel the same distance than gasohol or gasoline. Drivers still pay less in a flexfuel car with 100% alcohol in Brazil than 76-24 gasohol.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-20-2008, 03:47 PM
 
Location: 77441
3,161 posts, read 3,828,257 times
Reputation: 2303
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prince of Lombards View Post
What are the prices like for those fuels in Brazil? I can only find recent data for petrol.


here ya go, I took this over easter break in sao paulo.
price per liter, with a conversion of R$ 1.7 to US$ 1.0

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2008, 01:01 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, which as I understand was once upon a time ago part of the United States of America
849 posts, read 783,805 times
Reputation: 314
Thanks. BTW, is the Portuguese spoken in Brazil fairly similar to that spoken in Portugal, or is it a lot different like Mexican Spanish vs. Castillian?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2008, 04:28 PM
 
Location: 77441
3,161 posts, read 3,828,257 times
Reputation: 2303
its like queens english to american english.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-21-2008, 05:19 PM
 
Location: state of enlightenment
2,390 posts, read 4,677,519 times
Reputation: 2440
Decimating the Amazon at the rate of 1 Rhode Island a year will do wonders for an economy. For a while. McClatchy Washington Bureau | 09/09/2007 | As Brazil's rain forest burns down, planet heats up
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Americas
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top