U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Alaska > Anchorage
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-05-2011, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Homosassa, Florida
2,200 posts, read 2,653,433 times
Reputation: 456

Advertisements

River Barges around Anchorage is that a good system to utilize up or down river rather than trucking? Anchorage always seems to grow over period of time. Does Anchorage have an actual cut off point for no major construction outside the city? You have small towns and then pure wilderness.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-05-2011, 09:10 PM
 
Location: 112 Ocean Avenue
5,706 posts, read 4,872,535 times
Reputation: 8674
Like 9/11, the earthquake of 1964 changed everything. It's up to Alaskans to decide if they're going to let the earthquakes win.

If you fail to build tall skyscrapers, then the earthquakes won, and your image of being rough & tough will be relegated to French Cheese-eating Surrender Monkey status.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2011, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Over the Rainbow...
5,964 posts, read 7,203,763 times
Reputation: 3065
Quote:
Originally Posted by RedJacket View Post
Like 9/11, the earthquake of 1964 changed everything. It's up to Alaskans to decide if they're going to let the earthquakes win.

If you fail to build tall skyscrapers, then the earthquakes won, and your image of being rough & tough will be relegated to French Cheese-eating Surrender Monkey status.
We generally don't like sky scrapers, they block the view of the mountains. IMO Anchorage already has too many tall buildings.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-05-2011, 10:16 PM
 
3,774 posts, read 7,630,926 times
Reputation: 1742
I think our skyline is just right. If I want a great view of the city, I go up to Glen Alps. I don't need the Sears Tower, and building it on the west end of Merill Field would be the height of folly (sick pun in there).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2011, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Homosassa, Florida
2,200 posts, read 2,653,433 times
Reputation: 456
Las Vegas Resort Hotels should market heavy in Anchorage. Imagine the thrill in the Winter Months heading to Las Vegas for vacation. Why go to the Hawaii Islands all the time from Anchorage. I went to Las Vegas one time from Skagway, Alaska coming back home and another time from Grand Canyon North Rim.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-02-2012, 06:49 AM
 
1 posts, read 616 times
Reputation: 10
Well I would suggest population itself is not exactly the determining factor of whether a particular place has skyscrapers. Rather, such a feature is subject to a combination of the natural environment (geography, topography, geology, climate, flora and fauna) and the political-economy (government, regulation, political geography, historic/collective history). The Demographics (economic activity, population, population density) and the Built Environment certainly have some relevance, but are largely factors that follow not lead.

That is Anchorage with its 300k population simply is not the same as Cincinnati. Anchorage was founded in the 1900's, developed most since the 1950's, has a fairly flat topography (especially for coastal Alaska), has a fair bit of serious seismic activity, and has city limits that spreads over nearly 2,000 square miles (essentially one governing entity for the region).

By Comparison, Cincinnati was founded in 1788, has a topography shaped by several rivers and steep hills that eventually level off into plains (well north of the basin containing the core city). It has little seismic activity, no hurricanes, and rarely floods; since 1950's anyhow. The city proper developed most rapidly between 1825-1950, has city limits that cover less than 80 square miles, borders another state (and the metro region has hundreds of political entities). Oh, and while Cincinnati proper has 300,000 or so residents (in only 80 mi sq), it's metro populations is over 2 million (contained roughly the same area as Anchorage).

One more comparison...Manhattan has fairly flat topography, is surrounded by rivers and a natural deep harbor, was founded in the early 17th Century, has low natural disaster occurrence (seismic, flooding, and etc.), covers 22 square miles (but is part of a larger 305 mi sq city), has developed rapidly (measured by factors such as building square footage & FAR, and population) from 1820 through 1950 and again from 1980 through the present. It has 1.6 million residents, easily twice and its population easily doubles during the work day.

Quote:
Originally Posted by insightofitall View Post
The construction of tall skyscrapers isn't dictated by a city's population. It's driven by the need for office space, and other economic factors. There are many cities with populations far greater than Anchorage which still don't have tall skyscrapers to "match their population". For instance, one would think Phoenix would have some of the tallest skyscrapers in the country, because its population is nearly 1.5 million - but its tallest building is only 486'. There are many smaller cities with buildings taller than that. Cincinnati, for example, has less than 300,000 people - but its tallest building is 665'. Granted, Phoenix has height restrictions due to the proximity of its downtown to the airport, but population really has nothing to do with it. There are other examples that could be cited.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2012, 09:48 AM
 
Location: Wasilla, Alaska - USA
275 posts, read 269,704 times
Reputation: 333
Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanmechanic View Post
Anchorage was founded in the 1900's, developed most since the 1950's, has a fairly flat topography (especially for coastal Alaska), has a fair bit of serious seismic activity, and has city limits that spreads over nearly 2,000 square miles (essentially one governing entity for the region).
I never thought Anchorage had a particularly flat topography. If it feels flat, drive from government hill, onto C street, and continue down to Northern lights.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-04-2012, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Anchorage, AK
871 posts, read 659,949 times
Reputation: 609
Quote:
Originally Posted by AKStafford View Post
After the '64 earthquake Anchorage passed an ordinance limiting building height to 22 stories. Anchorage sits on an alluvial fan of glacier silt. When shaken in an earthquake it under goes liquefaction. Basically it turns into soup. If you ever spend time in downtown Anchorage, you'll occasionally notice some pipes coming up out of the ground. The best example is in the parking lot on 3rd Street overlooking the Railroad depot. These were installed in the hopes that the circulating air would help to prevent the liquefaction, but they've never had a real test.
For now there's still room to build in Anchorage without going up too high.
^^^This. Skyscrapers are usually found in very densely built-up areas. Downtown Anchorage is not densely built-up, by usual urban standards.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Alaska > Anchorage
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top