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View Poll Results: train horn blowing at crossing?
yes... blow the horn! 26 76.47%
no blow... silence is golden. 4 11.76%
yes...blow during daylight hours only... no blow at night. 4 11.76%
Voters: 34. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 09-21-2010, 07:59 PM
 
Location: San Diego, CA
4,258 posts, read 4,037,440 times
Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdog View Post
Richie, the issue is that there's not enough data for the RRs to say objectively whether the quiet zones are actually dangerous. It is their opinion and that's a subjective call. No industry likes increased regulations and change. It will always be easier for the conductor to do the exact same ritual at every crossing than it will be to have two sets of procedures depending on whether there's a quiet zone. Industry doesn't like to change, it's the nature of the beast. But time marches on, and we do evolve and change as a species.
It does not have as much to do with regulation or change, it has to do with liability. When an idiot runs the lights or goes around the gates and gets hit, he/she will no doubt try and sue the railroad or even the train crew (if he/she survives that is). In court it is always easier for the railroad to say the horn was blown than it is just to confirm the lights/gates were working. In this situation the horn is an important legal cushion for the railroad companies and employees. That more than anything fuels opposition to quiet zones from the railroads.

The only permanent solution is to replace at grade crossings with an overpass or underpass.
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Old 09-21-2010, 09:21 PM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
6,157 posts, read 9,736,816 times
Reputation: 6927
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frankie117 View Post
It does not have as much to do with regulation or change, it has to do with liability. When an idiot runs the lights or goes around the gates and gets hit, he/she will no doubt try and sue the railroad or even the train crew (if he/she survives that is). In court it is always easier for the railroad to say the horn was blown than it is just to confirm the lights/gates were working. In this situation the horn is an important legal cushion for the railroad companies and employees. That more than anything fuels opposition to quiet zones from the railroads.
I agree and meant to mention the liability aspect and then forgot in my haste out the door to go run an errand. I believe there is another reason the RRs want to be on record as opposing the quiet zone. That is, if somebody does get hit, the RR's can say they were against the quiet zones from the beginning and were forced into them so they're not liable.
Quote:
The only permanent solution is to replace at grade crossings with an overpass or underpass.
Or just close the road which is what they did a few miles up town on one crossing. Although they did build a new underpass a couple of miles away which really messed up traffic patterns. There's only one crossing downtown anyway which is at 4th St. There is also an underpass just a few blocks away at maybe 7th already. So as far as I'm concerned, they could eliminate the 4th St crossing and make folks drive a few extra blocks.

However would that be enough so that the trains don't need to blow their horn as they pass through town? There's an old historic train station downtown which has been closed for some time. However, it's currently being remodeled and will soon be open again. Will cargo trains for example that are not stopping at the station be required to blow their horns when in vicinity of the station? You tell me.

Regardless, Quiet Zones are also a permanent solution, so I'm not why you say that underpasses are the ONLY one. They're not.
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Old 09-21-2010, 10:12 PM
 
2,948 posts, read 3,456,880 times
Reputation: 1112
Quote:
However would that be enough so that the trains don't need to blow their horn as they pass through town? There's an old historic train station downtown which has been closed for some time. However, it's currently being remodeled and will soon be open again. Will cargo trains for example that are not stopping at the station be required to blow their horns when in vicinity of the station? You tell me.
If people are standing on the Amtrak platform in Flagstaff the train will sound the horn. That is within a "quiet zone" if I'm not mistaken.
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Old 09-21-2010, 10:22 PM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
6,157 posts, read 9,736,816 times
Reputation: 6927
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ritchie_az View Post
If people are standing on the Amtrak platform in Flagstaff the train will sound the horn. That is within a "quiet zone" if I'm not mistaken.
Makes sense, thanks.
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Old 09-23-2010, 12:38 AM
 
Location: kingman az ,ventura ca
59 posts, read 86,818 times
Reputation: 41
when i caught the westbound amtrak in flagstaff a few months ago it rang the engine bell as it pulled into the station. everybody was standing behind the safety line. while loading the amtrak, a eastbound freight came by on the ajoining south track and sounded its horn. it was probably for a safety issue. i fully understand blowing the horn when needed. i just think it is not allways needed... especially when the visability is fine and nobody is around that is a safety issue. but when safety is an issue.... blow the horn.
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Old 09-23-2010, 01:41 AM
 
Location: Birmingham, Alabama
1,972 posts, read 1,732,551 times
Reputation: 1133
I voted yes, blow the horn. I live very close to several train crossings, and the train blows its horn all the time, and it doesn't interfere with anything I do, day or night. There is a good reason the regulations are in place, and I dare say the railroads know more about railroad safety than the Federal government.

I know, I know, "go back to your own forum". Well I saw this thread on the front page and I thought it was interesting.
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Old 10-02-2010, 09:02 PM
 
Location: kingman az ,ventura ca
59 posts, read 86,818 times
Reputation: 41
well.... sounds like most prefer all the horn blowing.... still hope the city council restricts the excessive horn blowing. perhaps the federal laws need some tweaking.
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Old 10-03-2010, 06:02 PM
 
Location: On the Rails in Northern NJ
12,283 posts, read 12,298,068 times
Reputation: 4210
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrspeedyt View Post
well.... sounds like most prefer all the horn blowing.... still hope the city council restricts the excessive horn blowing. perhaps the federal laws need some tweaking.
Thats unlikely to happen , the feds rarely change Transportation laws and the Train Agencies would likely be against any changes. There really isn't excessive horn , unless a Rail Fanner like me is at or near a Crossing.
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Old 10-05-2010, 07:29 PM
 
260 posts, read 259,010 times
Reputation: 215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nexis4Jersey View Post
Thats unlikely to happen , the feds rarely change Transportation laws and the Train Agencies would likely be against any changes. There really isn't excessive horn , unless a Rail Fanner like me is at or near a Crossing.

Some of our friends live right next to the railroad and they love it.
They say they are so used to to the trains, and the horn blowing, they dont even notice.
If some people in Kingman dont like the horn blowing, maybe it would be best, if they move right next to the railroad, and they will get used to it, and will never even notice.
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Old 10-05-2010, 09:12 PM
 
Location: On the Rails in Northern NJ
12,283 posts, read 12,298,068 times
Reputation: 4210
Septa Now using these announcements at Crossings in Dense Urban Areas and Suburbs. They got the idea form Japan were there installed at busy crossings. By 2013 every intersection should have one.


YouTube - Doylestown Express


YouTube - R5 to Philadelphia
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