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Old 09-07-2009, 03:51 PM
 
123 posts, read 194,739 times
Reputation: 121

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Well In Prescott, AZ, you were made to tap into city water and sewer even if you had a well and septic and YOU had to pay for that work out of pocket. Governments and principalities make a lot of ordinances and laws behind closed doors without a by your leave (all over the country) and then, extort the homeowner.

It IS extortion because frankly, water is the NEW Currency and most of us will bend over gladly to have it. On the other hand, the fed and most states already have on the books, legislation to meter ALL privately owned domestic wells.

We fought them off in Cochise County but its only a matter of time before no one remembers that we did stop them and they go ahead and meter the private wells.

They can try and meter the wells in our area where we now live but they will end up with a nasty fight and no doubt we will be another Waco, Denton or Ruby Ridge. So be it. Sometimes blood must be spilled to stave off tyranny.

 
Old 09-07-2009, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Arizona
7,535 posts, read 2,999,502 times
Reputation: 3294
I live in Cottonwood and have both. I just flip a valve and I go from city to well. Of course I have a backflow preventer for the city water side. I don't have no stinking meter on my well and I use it to irrigate my property. I use city water for the house.
 
Old 11-16-2010, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Vista,Ca
4 posts, read 10,685 times
Reputation: 10
Does anybody have an Idea as to how much a well would cost? I don't have a clue.
 
Old 11-16-2010, 12:50 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
16,104 posts, read 14,132,090 times
Reputation: 4927
Quote:
Originally Posted by retroman454 View Post
Does anybody have an Idea as to how much a well would cost? I don't have a clue.
For the quotes I've seen it's worked out to about $35/foot including the pump & storage tank. For the well alone (without the pump & storage tank) I was quoted around $22/foot. The total cost of course will depend on the depth of your water as well as how big of a storage tank you desire.

Ken
 
Old 11-18-2010, 04:16 PM
 
Location: MT/35 yrs full time after 4 yrs part time
1,452 posts, read 1,550,848 times
Reputation: 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordBalfor View Post
For the quotes I've seen it's worked out to about $35/foot including the pump & storage tank. For the well alone (without the pump & storage tank) I was quoted around $22/foot. The total cost of course will depend on the depth of your water as well as how big of a storage tank you desire.

Ken
Quote:
Originally Posted by retroman454 View Post
Does anybody have an Idea as to how much a well would cost? I don't have a clue.
.......Hey Ken and retroman454:

In the past 78 years, I've never lived in a home that didn't have a private well.....In the last 45 years (4 homes that I built for my wife & family) I contracted with a water well drilling company to "drill the well" (to a depth that resulted in a minimum of 40 GPM, with a 1 HP "test pump and motor"--supplied by the well driller)... I then supplied the Submersible pump, motor and related controls (with advice from a minimum of 3 knowledgeable "people in the business"). I then had the drilling contractor set the pump 8 to 10 feet "up from the bottom of the hole", and had the Electrical Contractor I was using, do all the required wiring etc. Following this procedure saved me a minimum of 40% (as opposed to the "total-package price") from 3 local well drilling companies.

Following are some additional suggestions, tips and opinions that I have "learned", handling the well requirements for these 4 homes:
1: Talk to a least 3 other home owners in the immediate area about their wells: Ask about: (a) casing size--4 or 6"; ... (b) total depth of their wells;.... (c) at what depth is their pump set;.... (d)what size pump and (HP)motor;.... (e) what Brand name;..... (f) how many GPM do they pump at the well head; (g) what is the "static water level" vs the water level "under full-draw-down";.... (h)do they use a storage tank or just a pressure tank....or both?;.... (i) does their water require "softening of conditioning" (Culligan or ?);.... are they satisfied with their existing well system?

2/ Other factors that can (and will) effect the cost are: (a) are you drilling through: granite; dirt and gravel and/or sand (& maybe boulders).
(b) maybe a 4 to 6 foot layer of "clay" about 30 to 40 feet below grade;(this can be very beneficial under certain circumstances).....

The following "tip" is strictly my thinking on this aspect of a private well:............................................. . Remember, the "bottom-end" of the very first length of casing, is the location where the "water" gets into the well................Standard practice among many well drillers is to "cut slits" with a torch (approx 50) in the bottom 30 to 36" of that first length of casing.......This is how the water gets into the casing. I have always had them cuts these "slits" for at least the first 60"..........maybe as many as 90 slits......My thinkng is that you then have a far greater " length" of "perforated-casing" to intersect with an acquirfer that may be 5 or 6 feet in "thickness"............................Anyway,...i t's worked for me!!!

My present 6" well is 88' deep; has a 1 HP Stainless Steel Gould Pump and motor set at 80 feet. Static level is 20 feet below grade and has a "draw-down" level of 50 feet below grade-----WHILE PUMPING 44 GPM (at approx 62 psi) at the well head. I have no storage tank and pump directly into an 86 gal (total volume) pressure tank--useable gallons are approx 28 due to my pump "cut in/cut out settings" of 35 and 64 psi respectively.

Total cost 31 years ago was $2000......and still going strong!! Please God.....don't make me "eat those words"!!!
 
Old 11-18-2010, 05:27 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
16,104 posts, read 14,132,090 times
Reputation: 4927
Montana Griz - Very interesting.

Thanks

Ken
 
Old 11-18-2010, 05:34 PM
 
Location: San Jose, CA
6,356 posts, read 10,651,928 times
Reputation: 7630
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordBalfor View Post
Montana Griz - Very interesting.
I thought so too. Although, he forgot the most tip -- live in Montana! LOL! 80' well, huh? Not in Arizona you don't. I liked the long slots idea. You'll probably pay a bit extra for that, but it sure couldn't hurt.
 
Old 11-19-2010, 12:39 PM
 
5 posts, read 11,596 times
Reputation: 20
In terms of a water business idea, get a load of this one in St. Johns...

The Ice Company is on Municipal water. They pay what, .025 cents a gallon or so? They sell water to water haulers who have hauling tanks either on trailers or smaller ones on the back of their pickups. The Ice Company charges a penny a gallon with a coin operated dispenser that has a fire hose hanging from a 12' boom. No maintanence or servicing besides emptying the money machine and replacing the hose once a year or so.

(They also have a smaller filtered water dispenser like you see in grocery stores. Same thing, they pay .025 cents a gallon for the municipal water or so, then charge 25 cents a gallon for filtered water from the dispenser. ($1.00 for 5 gallons.) Every time I go by there, there's a line at the filtered water dispenser, 2 or 3 cars deep with people filling 3 gallon jugs. The only cost to the owners there is the cost of the dispenser initially, then changing the filters once in a while.)

Talk about a rip. But its convenient, relatively cheap and is certainly less expensive (in the short run) than having a well drilled so people are willing to pay it. If you're looking for a business to start, you may not need a drilling rig...
 
Old 11-19-2010, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
709 posts, read 952,710 times
Reputation: 899
One variable is the cost of the casing required, based on soil/rock type. AZ has a lot of loose/sandy soils, which may require casing all the way to the bottom of the hole. In the Ozarks, I got lucky...560' deep and only the top 20' required casing...the rest was solid limestone....not so good for the driller.

Regards
Gemstone1
 
Old 11-20-2010, 06:47 PM
 
228 posts, read 675,165 times
Reputation: 269
Just got a quote for a well in Utah. Said he would need to drill 200-300 feet at $55.00 a foot. I would think you could haul water in cheaper but in Utah you need to have running water in order to get a building permit. Also, most properties do not have water right and that is another $5-6K. Seems to me in Ohio they will drill for around 20-25 dollars a foot. Lots of drillers and not much going on.
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