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Old 12-31-2007, 05:46 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque
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Not how tall, but what is the maximum elevation?

Naturally, I think I've seen them at 3,000-3,500 feet, but can you grow them at 5,000 feet in Payson or 7,000 feet in Flagstaff?
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Old 12-31-2007, 06:00 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mortimer View Post
Not how tall, but what is the maximum elevation?

Naturally, I think I've seen them at 3,000-3,500 feet, but can you grow them at 5,000 feet in Payson or 7,000 feet in Flagstaff?
In short - no.
Take a look here:

http://www.nps.gov/sagu/planyourvisi...o%20Cactus.pdf

Sounds like 4,000 ft or so is the maximum you can normally expect to see them unless they have a particularly sheltered location.

Ken
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Old 01-01-2008, 12:00 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque
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LordBalfor knew the answer:

> Sounds like 4,000 ft or so is the maximum you can normally expect ...

Great link. It doesn't seem to be talking about cultivated saguaros though, but I assume the logic still applies. I would guess then that you could *make* a saguaro grow in flagstaff, but you would have to cover it and provide a heater for some of the year which would be problematic once it got big.

You can grow Aspen trees *below* their normal range, but all you really need to do it give them a bunch of water. Different problem.
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Old 01-01-2008, 10:07 AM
 
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Speaking of which, are there any nurseries that sell saguaros? Or where else would you get one? I'm assuming they're protected, and they probably don't give out permits for relocating them like they do other kinds of cactus. I wouldn't mind getting one.
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Old 01-01-2008, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque
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I bought three saguaros here:
http://www.arizonacactussales.com/
It is just S of the 202 on Arizona (Rt 87) in Chandler.

In 2000, I bought two 6" plants for $60 each and in
2001, I bouight a 3' plant for $100 (the price had come down).

Once the cactus 'discovered' my neighbor's irrigation system, they started growing a lot faster.

Currently, the 6" plants are 3' tall in the back and 6' tall in the front and the 3' plant is over 9' high.

I took time-lapse photos of these and a couple of organ-pipe cactus to see how they grow over the seven years we've owned them so that it is like a movie with pictures taken from the same spot every 3-6 months.

I started this thread because of a question in the New Mexico forum about growing them in Alamogordo:
Alamogordo Cacti and Palms
It is reported that there is an old, healthy plant in the center of town in Albuquerque.

I don't know how a saguaro would survive a long freeze since it is full of water in its pulp.
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Old 01-01-2008, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
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Too much water too fast will eventually kill your saguaro. Saguaros transplanted should be in well drained areas and watered by mother nature only. Irrigation water will eventually cause bacterial necrosis, or rotting of the saguaro. This happens very slowly over a period of several years.
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Old 01-01-2008, 08:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mortimer View Post
I bought three saguaros here:
http://www.arizonacactussales.com/
It is just S of the 202 on Arizona (Rt 87) in Chandler.
Thanks for the link, Mortimer.
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Old 01-02-2008, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque
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nitram advised:

> Too much water too fast will eventually kill your saguaro.

If not directly, then be allowing the plant to have weak roots, I've seen them blow over.

I started my saguaros by splashing a cup on them every couple of weeks and then never watered again after I noticed new growth.

The overwatering came after a few years when they sent tap roots outside my yard. It's a shame. Those cacti are way too plump.

Our neighbors have desert landscaping, but continue to overwater after all these years.

Our community green space has desert landscaping at the edges, but they just pour water on the desert trees every friggin' day. When the monsoons come, a few always get blown over and their root balls are like basketballs - this for trees that are 12'-16' high and 6"-8" or so thick.
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Old 01-02-2008, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Phoenix metro
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Ive heard (straight from the horses mouth) from the Sonoran Desert Museum that their transplanted Saguaros have a high mortality rate. My FIL had a 25 footer transplanted outside his backyard wall and its not doing well at all, the first 5' or so have turned black and all the ribs are exposed.
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Old 01-02-2008, 05:41 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
41,379 posts, read 52,714,570 times
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mortimer; your neighbors are doing everything wrong. They need an education on watering and desert plant survival. If they are in AZ then I would suggest they (or you) get planting and care information from the U of A Cooperative Extension Svc. sent to them. In Phoenix their number is 602-470-8086. The info is free and they will mail it to you/them. Or go on line to their education web site listed below.
If nothing is done to correct the situation, all the plants will suffer and everybody will be unhappy.
When describing the rootball as being basketball size on a 16 foot tree, that tells me that they are not watering deep enough. I don't know how long the tree(s) have been in, but a 16 foot tree right now should be watered once every 4-6 weeks for several hours on a drip, or slow watering system. Slow 'deep' watering encourages deep rooting a strong tap root and a balanced tree. Shallow watering only creates top heavy trees that blow over easily in any storm and may fall on a car, a house, a person, or?? and cause a lot of damage.
Cooperative Extension Svc AZ - Google Search
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