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Old 07-02-2018, 03:36 PM
 
Location: out standing in my field
1,062 posts, read 1,686,991 times
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I have noticed that since "official" dates have been instituted for the monsoon season, people start moaning about wanting rain a lot earlier; like June 1st. I much prefer the older, more meteorological definition of three or more consecutive days at 55 degree dewpoints. An evaporative cooler is a much better indicator than all the weather wonks put together. Over 55 degrees dewpoint, little evaporation = no cooling = monsoon season has begun.
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Old 07-02-2018, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Phoenix AZ
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The NWS setting official start and end dates for "monsoon season" is no different than their doing so for "hurricane season", which they've been doing for many years. Besides, it provides for more efficient education of the populace. They are able to efficiently schedule and produce Monsoon Awareness Week, Skywarn spotter training, and other educational packages.
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Old 07-02-2018, 08:09 PM
 
Location: On the phone
948 posts, read 357,777 times
Reputation: 1815
Frizzy hair is my indication of Monsoon Season.
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Old 07-03-2018, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Pinetop-Lakeside, AZ
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Me? I look outside and see how much the clouds are building. When they get good and big and lightning and thunder, then a monsoon is upon me.
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Old 07-03-2018, 07:51 AM
 
Location: AriZona
5,230 posts, read 3,635,838 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maiden_fern View Post
Frizzy hair is my indication of Monsoon Season.
Quote:
Originally Posted by teddyearp View Post
Me? I look outside and see how much the clouds are building. When they get good and big and lightning and thunder, then a monsoon is upon me.
Sounds right, Earp...

but Fern's Frizzy hair sounds pretty good, too.
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Old 07-03-2018, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Yuma and Walker, AZ
306 posts, read 218,869 times
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I moved here from MI 5 years ago and laughed when people talked about monsoons and humidity. Now that I've been here awhile I find myself bitching when the humidity gets over 20%. First World problems!
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Old 07-03-2018, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Studio City, CA 91604
3,051 posts, read 3,595,397 times
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Here in Southern California, we get the Monsoon during Summer too. I drive up to the Antelope Valley to visit my brother and nieces and I can always tell when a bit of monsoon moisture is making its way over into Southern California.

The nights will get completely still. The moon will get enveloped in a "haze" which indicates lots of moisture in the air. The bugs will sense the moisture coming and start getting active and the birds will follow suite. A slight breeze will pick up from the east or south, and then the next day ....like clockwork....little puffs of cumulus will appear early in the morning and grow throughout the day into large, towering thunderheads.

The mountains around So Cal always seem to get the worse downpours. You will look up toward the mountains and see large shafts of rain pouring down, illuminated by frequent lightning strikes.

I was out in the Palm Springs area at one time when a signficant Monsoon thunderstorm was erupting over the San Jacinto mountains...just gorgeous! ...What a sight to behold!

It's ALWAYS so amazing!

Never get tired of seeing that!
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Old 07-03-2018, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Traveling
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Nice dark clouds overhead. It will be interesting to see what develops.
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Old 07-03-2018, 10:07 PM
 
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The first thunderstorms hit about 10 days to 2 weeks after the cicadas get going full swing.
They started up just a few days ago.. kind of.
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Old 07-04-2018, 01:50 PM
 
Location: East Central Phoenix
6,690 posts, read 9,783,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chaparrito View Post
I have noticed that since "official" dates have been instituted for the monsoon season, people start moaning about wanting rain a lot earlier; like June 1st. I much prefer the older, more meteorological definition of three or more consecutive days at 55 degree dewpoints. An evaporative cooler is a much better indicator than all the weather wonks put together. Over 55 degrees dewpoint, little evaporation = no cooling = monsoon season has begun.
Agree 100%. The official "season" which the NWS established means very little in the big picture, especially the June 15th start date. We hardly ever have any kind of monsoon weather during all of June, and even the first part of July is often the same. It's usually after July 4th when the humidity increases and more storms start popping up here & there, but it really doesn't get fully established until the middle part of July.

Also, with the June 15th start date, you're correct that people start wishing for rain in June, which very rarely happens since June is the driest month of the year on average. Even when the monsoon is fully established, it's still not a guarantee that there will be rain ... in fact, some places in & around Phoenix, and much of the western part of AZ might have no rain all summer. We should be more focused the winter storm season (December through March) which produces more widespread precipitation, and is much more of a benefit to the water supplies than the summer monsoon.
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