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Old 05-26-2008, 11:08 AM
 
6 posts, read 18,034 times
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I live in Pinal County for about two years and so far have seen only two scorpions, a bark scorpion (yellow and black) and a smaller (but more dangerous) yellow one. I crushed them, one with a shovel and the other using a pair of tongs to remove the "beast" from the corner of my house, crushing it with a large hammer. Not many products will kill an active scorpion, unless you just crush it. They usually come out at night to hunt for crickets and insects etc. A black light is useful in spotting them as they do fluoresce. Careful, in the daytime they look somewhat slow and asleep, however they can speed up at any time!! An exterminator comes to the house every three months to spray all around the property outside. Cats are said to be immune from the sting of a scorpion but won't kill it.

 
Old 05-26-2008, 11:48 AM
 
5 posts, read 22,701 times
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Thanks, Steve-o, for the information. If you don't mind, i've couple more questions for you, the site's scorpion expert:

How dangerous is that species with the lovely name? (Is it for real, or are you making fun of my ignorance?) Are they as likely to enter the house as the ones, south of there, on lower ground?

I am unfortunately rather terrified of being stung...especially after one of your posts mentioned a guy who never recovered from a chronic feeling of being burned by a cigarette. OUCH! I think you said he'd been stung by one of the Mexican scorpions? Maybe that species isn't hangin' out in Payson? hahah!

and then is my major concern: my precious little 20 year old Siamese who grew up in NYC.....

Thanks for sharing all your knowledge!

Last edited by annabellavia; 05-26-2008 at 11:50 AM.. Reason: correct a comma, add a few words.
 
Old 05-27-2008, 09:34 AM
 
Location: AZ
19,646 posts, read 51,214,300 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DesertDovey View Post
I live in Pinal County for about two years and so far have seen only two scorpions, a bark scorpion (yellow and black) and a smaller (but more dangerous) yellow one
Bark scorpions are "black and yellow"? What, like a bee? Bark scorpions are a pale yellow, just like most scorpions found in the Sonoran Desert. And the bark scorpion is the most dangerous scorpion in AZ, by far. So the smaller one you saw was not "more dangerous", unless it was also a bark scorpion.
 
Old 05-27-2008, 09:44 AM
 
Location: AZ
19,646 posts, read 51,214,300 times
Reputation: 8934
Quote:
Originally Posted by annabellavia View Post
Thanks, Steve-o, for the information. If you don't mind, i've couple more questions for you, the site's scorpion expert:

How dangerous is that species with the lovely name? (Is it for real, or are you making fun of my ignorance?) Are they as likely to enter the house as the ones, south of there, on lower ground?

I am unfortunately rather terrified of being stung...especially after one of your posts mentioned a guy who never recovered from a chronic feeling of being burned by a cigarette. OUCH! I think you said he'd been stung by one of the Mexican scorpions? Maybe that species isn't hangin' out in Payson? hahah!

and then is my major concern: my precious little 20 year old Siamese who grew up in NYC.....

Thanks for sharing all your knowledge!
Hello! No, I was in no way "making fun of you". That scorpion specie I mentioned is very real, I just used it as an example to show you that several scorpion species call the Payson area home. If you want, just Google "Vaejovis paysonensis" and you should be able to find more info on them. The only scorpion you really should look out for are the bark scorpions (Centruroides exilicauda), they are the only species of scorpion in AZ that is considered medically significant. A healthy adult will just pretty much bi**h and moan when theyre stung, as it does hurt a great deal. And the guy who was stung, did eventually recover from his painful symptoms, but it took several months (which isnt unusual). Those who have weakened immune systems, the elderly and infants are most at risk for severe reactions. There is really nothing to worry about regarding scorpions, unless you are or have family members who are at risk. Id worry more about rattlesnakes than anything else, theyll mess you up alot more than any scorpion can. As for scorpions entering your home, they might or they might not. Some people have problems, others dont. Most of the scorpions prefer to hide under ground litter (ie rocks, branches, leaf litter, garbage, wood, etc), but can and do enter homes.
 
Old 05-27-2008, 01:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Most of the scorpions prefer to hide under ground litter (ie rocks, branches, leaf litter, garbage, wood, etc), but can and do enter homes.
And the obvious lesson is to keep your yard clear of litter. I used to have a roach problem (here in Los Angeles) but when I cemented in an area between my garage and the property line (usually piled in leaves) the roach problem went down dramatically. I hardly ever see them these days.
 
Old 05-27-2008, 02:46 PM
 
Location: AZ
19,646 posts, read 51,214,300 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovehound View Post
And the obvious lesson is to keep your yard clear of litter
Yes, that helps. But scorpions are mostly found under "natural litter", if you will (ie rocks, bark, etc).
 
Old 05-27-2008, 04:49 PM
 
94 posts, read 199,398 times
Reputation: 116
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Bark scorpions are "black and yellow"? What, like a bee? Bark scorpions are a pale yellow, just like most scorpions found in the Sonoran Desert. And the bark scorpion is the most dangerous scorpion in AZ, by far. So the smaller one you saw was not "more dangerous", unless it was also a bark scorpion.
Hi Steve,
I'm in Prescott and see a fair amount of scorpions on my property, especially at night. To me they all look like bark scorpions but my son says they are another type since they have a somewhat thicker tail and claws. I have looked at photos on the web but still can't tell if what I have are bark scorpions.
Is there an easy and sure way to tell if it's a bark scorpion or a less dangerous type?
 
Old 05-27-2008, 05:04 PM
 
Location: AZ
19,646 posts, read 51,214,300 times
Reputation: 8934
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich V View Post
Hi Steve,
I'm in Prescott and see a fair amount of scorpions on my property, especially at night. To me they all look like bark scorpions but my son says they are another type since they have a somewhat thicker tail and claws. I have looked at photos on the web but still can't tell if what I have are bark scorpions.
Is there an easy and sure way to tell if it's a bark scorpion or a less dangerous type?
Well, your son is right on with his description, major kudos to him! Bark scorpions do have a very slender "tail" (metasoma) compared to other scorpion species in AZ. Besides bark scorpions, the other most common genus/species of scorpions found in AZ are Vaejovidae species, mainly Vaejovis spinigeris , Vaejovis confusus and Vaejovis coahuilae. Vaejovids have thicker tails, and slightly more rounded claws (chelae) than bark scorpions (Centruroides genus). This might help... print and compare the two pictures for ID purposes.

Vaejovid:
http://www.mantopia.dk/images/advs.jpg

Centruroides exilicauda (AZ bark scorpion):
http://www.geocities.com/pakoleno/c_exilicauda.jpg
(^) male bark scorpion... note how long the "tail" is.

Centruroides exilicauda (AZ bark scorpion):
http://bugguide.net/images/raw/LRNHL...RLCHHL1HGH.jpg
(^) female bark scorpion... note how short the "tail" is. Sexing male and female bark scorpions is very easy due to that distinguishing characteristic.

Compare the Vaejovid with the bark scorpion and note tail thickness differences, claw shape and size differences, etc.
 
Old 05-27-2008, 05:48 PM
 
94 posts, read 199,398 times
Reputation: 116
Thanks Steve
I found a photo my son took can you identify it?

 
Old 05-27-2008, 06:04 PM
 
Location: AZ
19,646 posts, read 51,214,300 times
Reputation: 8934
Yep, thats a female bark scorpion (Centruroides exilicauda) from the looks of it. Nice photo!

Also, I must mention that there is another specie of scorpion in Arizona commonly called the "Arizona dune scorpion", scientifically known as Smeringurus mesaensis. These are also confused with bark scorpions, but a quick look at the claw shape and size will easily tell them apart. Note the slender tail on the dune scorpion below (my picture) and compare to the bark scorpion your son took a picture of. Confusing, eh? Then look at the claw shape and size, the dune scorpion's claws are much larger in appearance.
http://i83.photobucket.com/albums/j2...profileofS.jpg
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