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Old 02-15-2010, 07:12 PM
 
Location: Buckeye, Az
759 posts, read 1,123,930 times
Reputation: 447

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WYO_BOUND_in2011 View Post
I hate the heat!
You live in Safford, there is no heat (in comparison to the Valley.) I was there in July 2008, and it was 89F. That is not hot, I call that perfect.
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Old 02-15-2010, 07:25 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
16,035 posts, read 13,955,621 times
Reputation: 4903
Quote:
Originally Posted by AzDesertRat86 View Post
You live in Safford, there is no heat (in comparison to the Valley.) I was there in July 2008, and it was 89F. That is not hot, I call that perfect.
That's SE Arizona for ya'.
Aside from SoCal, the best climate in the mainland USA.



Ken
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Old 02-15-2010, 07:36 PM
 
Location: State of Jefferson coast
965 posts, read 1,616,937 times
Reputation: 1195
Something that a lot of people from more humid climates don't realize is that the reported daily high temperature is not a very good gauge of the average comfort level during the bulk of the day. Dry climates have a high degree of daily fluctuation (generally about 35-40 degrees in most of Arizona), and a day that gets up to 95 in the peak of the afternoon might start off at a pre-dawn low of 58. That means most of the day is a cool-to-temperate span in the 60's and 70's. I remember one day in March when the high temperature was 92 but the total amount of time that the temperature was over 80 was less than an hour -- just a short-lived heat spike late in the afternoon. Conversely, at this time of the year, a daily high of 72 might sound perfect to some, but it will be a chilly morning on the way up there and a chilly evening after the sun goes down as well. The other thing is that in a really dry climate the perceived comfort level changes slowly. 65 is pretty comfortable -- cool, but nice in the sun (though long pants weather for me) -- and 100 is pretty comfortable, too, though I'd want a hat and would start looking for some shade about then. 80-90 is just about ideal, at least for those who've lived in the desert for more than a year.

Now when you get up at 7:00 a.m. and it's already past 90, well...that's another story.
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Old 02-15-2010, 08:12 PM
 
Location: Baja Arizona
2,916 posts, read 5,087,360 times
Reputation: 1079
Quote:
Originally Posted by LordBalfor View Post
That's SE Arizona for ya'.
Aside from SoCal, the best climate in the mainland USA.



Ken
Not to mention the occasional Rex Allen, Jr sightings!
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Old 02-16-2010, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Guam & Wisconsin
562 posts, read 1,013,849 times
Reputation: 359
Quote:
We have no clue how you guys in northeast Ohio can stand the cold where you are stuck indoors for long periods of time.
Easy, put some clothes on!
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Old 02-16-2010, 12:55 PM
 
Location: Guam & Wisconsin
562 posts, read 1,013,849 times
Reputation: 359
Quote:
what do you do when its 100+ degrees? Is there much of a diffrence between 90 degrees and 110 degrees?
Up to 100 degrees is bearable. Above that gets miserable and doesn't cool off at night. It's only in the 110 range from Jun - Sep though. May and Oct are only about 100. Apr and Nov are around 90.
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Old 02-16-2010, 01:20 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
16,035 posts, read 13,955,621 times
Reputation: 4903
Quote:
Originally Posted by notmuch69 View Post
Easy, put some clothes on!
Personally, I'm of the opinion that if you need to wear ANY clothes for any reason other than modesty then it's TOO COLD. You should NEVER had to wear clothes simply to keep warm - NEVER.

Ken
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Old 02-16-2010, 01:56 PM
 
Location: Outside of Los Angeles
1,227 posts, read 1,513,332 times
Reputation: 733
How do you stand the heat? Well this may seem obvious enough but water, water water! Make sure you drink enough fluids if you know that you will be outside for long periods. I make sure to replace fluids at least every 20 minutes or so. Also, wear light colored clothing as that reflects the heat off instead of absorbing it. Besides that... well let's see... I think its a matter of accepting it the way it is. Acceptance of the way things are instead of trying to change them is another way but that is only possible IMO if you are at the proper level spiritually. I am by no means a heat lover but I try to tolerate it as best I can.
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Old 02-16-2010, 04:31 PM
 
Location: NE Phoenix
81 posts, read 134,264 times
Reputation: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brenda-by-the-sea View Post
Something that a lot of people from more humid climates don't realize is that the reported daily high temperature is not a very good gauge of the average comfort level during the bulk of the day. Dry climates have a high degree of daily fluctuation (generally about 35-40 degrees in most of Arizona), and a day that gets up to 95 in the peak of the afternoon might start off at a pre-dawn low of 58. That means most of the day is a cool-to-temperate span in the 60's and 70's. I remember one day in March when the high temperature was 92 but the total amount of time that the temperature was over 80 was less than an hour -- just a short-lived heat spike late in the afternoon. Conversely, at this time of the year, a daily high of 72 might sound perfect to some, but it will be a chilly morning on the way up there and a chilly evening after the sun goes down as well. The other thing is that in a really dry climate the perceived comfort level changes slowly. 65 is pretty comfortable -- cool, but nice in the sun (though long pants weather for me) -- and 100 is pretty comfortable, too, though I'd want a hat and would start looking for some shade about then. 80-90 is just about ideal, at least for those who've lived in the desert for more than a year.

Now when you get up at 7:00 a.m. and it's already past 90, well...that's another story.
Awesome post!
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Old 02-16-2010, 05:06 PM
 
8 posts, read 5,540 times
Reputation: 13
I don't mind it.
But why was my thread moved?
does anybody know?
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