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Old 06-03-2010, 10:09 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
15,842 posts, read 13,674,707 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by locolobo13 View Post
Looking at the map AZDreamer provided it looks like the Chiricahuas, Catalinas, Grahams and the San Francisco Mtns get the most. All higher elevations.

Kinda makes sense. I can remember watching the San Francisco Mtns during summer days from the neighboring forest. It seemed like they attracted clouds to them.
They don't ATTRACT clouds, they CREATE them. Mountains do that - they create their OWN weather.

Ken
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Old 06-04-2010, 12:44 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arushan View Post
What spot in AZ receives the most precip in the entire state and about how many inches a year are we talking? Even if it's just a blip on the map. I'll bet it's at a high elevation somewhere. And what kind of vegetation will one find at the given area? I'm sure there would be Douglas Firs, Spruce, and aspens, but would there be any Western Red Cedars or anything else of note?

Pics would be really nice too!
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Old 07-26-2010, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Peoria, AZ & Munds Park, AZ
177 posts, read 209,525 times
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Well-The white mountains are at an elevation of between 8,000-11,800. Also,the san francisco peaks area, specifically the inner basin, and the kibab Plateau. The kaibab plateau's vegetation is known to be exactly the same as the vegetation of the medicine bow mountains of wyoming. Arizona's high elevations contain every type of spruce and fir that grows in the high elevations of the west, except canadian, alaskan, and California Species.
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Old 07-27-2010, 11:00 PM
Status: "NIMBYs be gone!!!" (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: East Central Phoenix
3,482 posts, read 4,479,701 times
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Crown King is one of the wettest places in Arizona according to the 30 year averages. During the winter storm season alone, they average 14 inches of precipitation (December through March). In the summer monsoon (June through September) they average a little less than nine inches. Their grand total for the year comes to nearly 28 1/2 inches.
CLIMATE NORMALS

A place called Happy Jack at 7,500 in elevation also averages nearly 28 inches per year, and most of it falls as snow in the winter. It seems that locations in north central Arizona (specifically Bradshaw Mountains & the Mogollon Rim) and eastern Arizona (specifically the White Mountains) are the wettest areas.
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Old 07-28-2010, 03:33 PM
 
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Wettest Cities or towns via rainfall in the monsoon and Snowfall during winter. I would say Lakeside/Pinetop in the Eastern White Mountains. And Greer located at the 9,000' elevation also in the White Mountains of Eastern Arizona.
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Old 07-29-2010, 01:54 PM
 
Location: PHX, AZ
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I think I'd love to live in some of these places. As much as I love Phoenix, and Arizona in general, I'm getting really tired of heat island effect and watching monsoon season storms pile up on the edges od town, then push around the side. Living inside the 101 loop, monsoon season pretty much means "cruel, humid joke."

100 years ago, these rainy locations were probably near impossible to get to.
Today, they're just too far from established urban conveniences, I suspect.
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Old 07-29-2010, 01:59 PM
 
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Quote:
I think I'd love to live in some of these places. As much as I love Phoenix, and Arizona in general, I'm getting really tired of heat island effect and watching monsoon season storms pile up on the edges od town, then push around the side. Living inside the 101 loop, monsoon season pretty much means "cruel, humid joke."
It's cyclical. El Nino is the reason last year and this year's monsoon has been weak. When La Nina comes around, the monsoon will be especially strong.
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Old 07-31-2010, 09:18 PM
 
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The wettest spot i think on average is Mount Graham in the Pinaleno Mountains. I hear they average about 40in of precipitation a year and is sometimes considered a rainforest. The white mountains are also very wet expecially around Hannagan Meadows and that area.
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Old 07-31-2010, 09:38 PM
 
Location: SE Arizona - FINALLY! :D
15,842 posts, read 13,674,707 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckzona View Post
The wettest spot i think on average is Mount Graham in the Pinaleno Mountains. I hear they average about 40in of precipitation a year and is sometimes considered a rainforest. The white mountains are also very wet expecially around Hannagan Meadows and that area.
I got to tell ya' I had to laugh at the "rainforest" comment. Considering that the Hoh Valley (a true rainforest) gets 150 inches (12 FEET!!!!) of rain a year, the 40 inches of Mt Graham is relatively dry.

Still for Arizona, that's quite a bit to be sure.

Ken
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Old 07-31-2010, 09:57 PM
 
2,943 posts, read 3,617,670 times
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It rained quite a bit in parts of Phoenix today....
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