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Old 07-24-2008, 06:43 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
15,535 posts, read 29,284,603 times
Reputation: 21282

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NOEM1226 View Post
Am a the only one tired of us Arkansans getting a really bad rap??

The more I travel the more I grow tired of people associating Arkansas with hillbillies.When I was a military wife and I moved to the West Coast as well as the Northeast I was actually asked if I knew how to read?! I have gone to college!

I continue to get asked how I felt about growing up on a farm. I grew up in Fayetteville for the most part! Although Northwest Arkansas is full of natural beauty- nowadays we are filled with more and more educated people.I think outsiders assume we have never been exposed to culture of any kind. This is not the case.

No offense to those of you who grew up on farms, as I know there are many rural areas here.BUT WHAT DOES IT TAKE FOR ARKANSAS TO BE SEEN AS SOMETHING OTHER THAN SOME BACKWOODS, RED HEADED STEPCHILD???? Do you think this can be chalked up to lack of other knowledge of this state or what?

Many of us are more civilized than we are given credit for and have seen much of the world, yet everywhere we go we are seen as simple hicks-what gives??! Sorry, but had to vent.
It annoys me when people equate living in a rural environment with being stupid. Nothing could be further from the truth. Running a farm, even a small homestead, takes an enormous amount of learning, wisdom and experience. Trust me when I say that taking care of livestock is much more complex than sitting in a cubicle somewhere, staring at a computer screen and punching in "data". Rural living requires, not only knowledge but the physical stamina required to work very hard for extended periods of time. Something that many city-dwellers are incapable of doing, thanks to a lifestyle that has made them soft.

As for being a hick. I don't know if that would be an insult or a compliment. I am reminded of a certain fellow (whose name I will keep to myself), who had about 1,200 acres and about 1000 head of cattle and was worth about $2,000,000 or so. I never saw a day that he did not wear a tattered old pair of overalls and quite often his boots smelled of cow manure. Not to mention th fact that he was missing a few teeth in the front and talked with a twang that would make your eyes water.

Whenever I see a farmer in the store or on the street I treat them with the utmost respect. Not only are they hard working and proud but they are the backbone of this country and are the ones that put the food on our table.

IMHO anyone who thinks any less of them than that are stupid. So next time someone calls you a hick from the sticks, I'd thank them if I were you.

20yrsinBranson

 
Old 07-25-2008, 12:13 PM
 
292 posts, read 1,136,611 times
Reputation: 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
It annoys me when people equate living in a rural environment with being stupid. Nothing could be further from the truth. Running a farm, even a small homestead, takes an enormous amount of learning, wisdom and experience. Trust me when I say that taking care of livestock is much more complex than sitting in a cubicle somewhere, staring at a computer screen and punching in "data". Rural living requires, not only knowledge but the physical stamina required to work very hard for extended periods of time. Something that many city-dwellers are incapable of doing, thanks to a lifestyle that has made them soft.

As for being a hick. I don't know if that would be an insult or a compliment. I am reminded of a certain fellow (whose name I will keep to myself), who had about 1,200 acres and about 1000 head of cattle and was worth about $2,000,000 or so. I never saw a day that he did not wear a tattered old pair of overalls and quite often his boots smelled of cow manure. Not to mention th fact that he was missing a few teeth in the front and talked with a twang that would make your eyes water.

Whenever I see a farmer in the store or on the street I treat them with the utmost respect. Not only are they hard working and proud but they are the backbone of this country and are the ones that put the food on our table.

IMHO anyone who thinks any less of them than that are stupid. So next time someone calls you a hick from the sticks, I'd thank them if I were you.

20yrsinBranson
Amen!!
 
Old 07-25-2008, 01:06 PM
 
1,661 posts, read 4,363,915 times
Reputation: 1288
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
It annoys me when people equate living in a rural environment with being stupid. Nothing could be further from the truth. Running a farm, even a small homestead, takes an enormous amount of learning, wisdom and experience. Trust me when I say that taking care of livestock is much more complex than sitting in a cubicle somewhere, staring at a computer screen and punching in "data". Rural living requires, not only knowledge but the physical stamina required to work very hard for extended periods of time. Something that many city-dwellers are incapable of doing, thanks to a lifestyle that has made them soft.

As for being a hick. I don't know if that would be an insult or a compliment. I am reminded of a certain fellow (whose name I will keep to myself), who had about 1,200 acres and about 1000 head of cattle and was worth about $2,000,000 or so. I never saw a day that he did not wear a tattered old pair of overalls and quite often his boots smelled of cow manure. Not to mention th fact that he was missing a few teeth in the front and talked with a twang that would make your eyes water.

Whenever I see a farmer in the store or on the street I treat them with the utmost respect. Not only are they hard working and proud but they are the backbone of this country and are the ones that put the food on our table.

IMHO anyone who thinks any less of them than that are stupid. So next time someone calls you a hick from the sticks, I'd thank them if I were you.

20yrsinBranson
Wow...this thread rose like a phoenix from the ashes.

You are 110% right, and I've tried to be a little more gentle about that.

I'd hate to be around you on a bad day with a rollin' pin.

Just joshin' ya.........

I know, associate with, have supper with, and go to church with, a whole lot of folks just as you described.

Animal husbandry degrees abound.

They've forgot more than I'll ever know, and there's never been a day arrived that I didn't drink my coffee and wonder how the rest of the world survives without these, "gimme a butter knife and I'll fix your tractor and tune up your truck" kinda folks around.

Most states have their farm & ranch country. The only difference between ours and the one's from Montana is the speech pattern, and that's where people get hung up.

I just referred to that in another thread, that if you are concerned about being accepted in Arkansas, first make sure that *you* can accept it here.

Arkansas is not going to change just because you're looking for clean air, cheaper housing, and lower taxes.
 
Old 07-25-2008, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,404 posts, read 79,618,227 times
Reputation: 38726
Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
It annoys me when people equate living in a rural environment with being stupid. Nothing could be further from the truth. Running a farm, even a small homestead, takes an enormous amount of learning, wisdom and experience. Trust me when I say that taking care of livestock is much more complex than sitting in a cubicle somewhere, staring at a computer screen and punching in "data". Rural living requires, not only knowledge but the physical stamina required to work very hard for extended periods of time. Something that many city-dwellers are incapable of doing, thanks to a lifestyle that has made them soft.

As for being a hick. I don't know if that would be an insult or a compliment. I am reminded of a certain fellow (whose name I will keep to myself), who had about 1,200 acres and about 1000 head of cattle and was worth about $2,000,000 or so. I never saw a day that he did not wear a tattered old pair of overalls and quite often his boots smelled of cow manure. Not to mention th fact that he was missing a few teeth in the front and talked with a twang that would make your eyes water.

Whenever I see a farmer in the store or on the street I treat them with the utmost respect. Not only are they hard working and proud but they are the backbone of this country and are the ones that put the food on our table.

IMHO anyone who thinks any less of them than that are stupid. So next time someone calls you a hick from the sticks, I'd thank them if I were you.

20yrsinBranson
you mean we are not stupid? I guess I am too dumb to know that...

thanks for writing something with true meaning. ...Nita
 
Old 07-26-2008, 11:06 AM
 
292 posts, read 1,136,611 times
Reputation: 131
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogMar View Post
Arkansas is not going to change just because you're looking for clean air, cheaper housing, and lower taxes.
I sure hope it isn't. I love it the way it is....except for the forest fires every spring. I know we've discussed this and we disagree, but it still gets on my nerves big time.

I wish that people who want to live in hip, urban, metro, or whatever you want to call it places would just go where those places already are and leave us country folk alone!
 
Old 07-26-2008, 11:34 AM
 
1,661 posts, read 4,363,915 times
Reputation: 1288
Quote:
Originally Posted by luvarkansas View Post
I know we've discussed this and we disagree, but it still gets on my nerves big time.

I wish that people who want to live in hip, urban, metro, or whatever you want to call it places would just go where those places already are and leave us country folk alone!
The burn-off's we agree to disagree on.

That could be drug out like the CV deer hunt, and there's no future in beating a dead horse to jelly.

With the rest, I agree totally.

I've simply said all along that there are those places for them, and there are these places for us, and we all end up happy.

I don't criticize anyone for their pursuit of a lifestyle that's acceptable to them, I just ask that they don't criticize mine, or those that choose to either live, or be, "rural".

The urban areas of AR offer a lot, and you can't blame folks for wanting to go there.

Not everyone can tolerate waking up with the neighbor's cattle in yer flower garden.
 
Old 07-26-2008, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
69,404 posts, read 79,618,227 times
Reputation: 38726
Quote:
Originally Posted by RogMar View Post
The burn-off's we agree to disagree on.

That could be drug out like the CV deer hunt, and there's no future in beating a dead horse to jelly.

With the rest, I agree totally.

I've simply said all along that there are those places for them, and there are these places for us, and we all end up happy.

I don't criticize anyone for their pursuit of a lifestyle that's acceptable to them, I just ask that they don't criticize mine, or those that choose to either live, or be, "rural".

The urban areas of AR offer a lot, and you can't blame folks for wanting to go there.

Not everyone can tolerate waking up with the neighbor's cattle in yer flower garden.
This is what we love about AR, no, not the cattle in our flowers, but being able to live in a rural setting and still be close enough urban life, that we can get it if we want.

Nita
 
Old 07-26-2008, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Detroit Downriver
620 posts, read 1,826,550 times
Reputation: 402
Lot's of good reading on this newly resurrected thread. The subject's been so well covered, it's hard to imagine that there's anything left to say. Wait. Gimmie a second.

IMHO the process of forming stereotypes is a natural survival skill ingrained in our DNA from the first homo ergaster (they were even before the first homo erectus). In our lifetime of learning, one is expected to absorb millions of bits of information to use in coping with life's trials and tribulations. A bit of generalizing is bound to be necessary to keep the mind's decision tree functional so that we're not frozen in fear at every turn when confronted with something new. In short, it's just human nature.

We learn stereotypes from our parents, our peers and our own experiences. Try as we might, we can't avoid them in ourselves or in the minds of others. It really doesn't matter what the stereotype is. Be it the frugality of Jews, self depreciating Chinese, arrogant French, brilliantly technical Japanese, hard working lazy Mexicans (how'd they do that?), or irritating African/Americans, there is an element of truth on some level that became elevated in the collective conscience to become a generally accepted principal applicable to many of a particular geographic or ethnic subgroup of people. Not a truth, mind you, but a pseudo-truism. A generalization.

The Lil' Abner comic strip created the image of the hillbilly for the nation to enjoy. It was not purely imaginary. It was based on observation. The stereotype of the hillbilly, like all well publicized stereotypes, took on a life of its own and will probably never go away. We know that it is a mischaracterization of most of the people of N. Arkansas, yet we perpetuate it anyway whether we're from Smackover, Arkansas or Kalamazoo, Michigan. That's why we have a Dogpatch between Jasper and Harrison. Dogpatch is run down and unused as a business because of purely economic circumstances, but the hillbilly image that created Dogpatch lives on in the minds of those exposed to it, because on some level with some people it really is pretty accurate in its portrayal of Ozark living.

Personally, I think we should just go with it and be proud that we have a stereotype. Most regions don't have one. Ours gives people who have no reason to identify with us what-so-ever something to glom onto as a conversation starter, an ice breaker or just a point of common understanding. Think of how it would be if we had no stereotype for strangers to seize on.

"Hello, I'm from Nampa, Idaho."

"Oh. Don't know anything about it."

As opposed to:

"Hello, I'm from Jasper, Arkansas."

"Hillbilly huh? Where's your overalls? Whoah! You've got shoes on!"

"Nice of you to notice. You are quick, aren't you?"

Whatever the stereotype, we are a nation of individuals. If the stereotype hits too close to home, we might be a little uncomfortable with it and should perhaps look at self improvement. But, whoever you are, if you can be proud of what you are with everyone you meet, not only will you go far, but you wont mind the company behind the eyelids at night.

Last edited by Bull Winkus; 07-26-2008 at 05:58 PM.. Reason: Proof reading changes.
 
Old 07-26-2008, 05:57 PM
 
Location: In my playhouse.
1,047 posts, read 2,461,454 times
Reputation: 1717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bull Winkus View Post
Lot's of good reading on this newly resurrected thread. The subject's been so well covered, it's hard to imagine that there's anything left to say. Wait. Gimmie a second.

IMHO the process of forming stereotypes is a natural survival skill ingrained in our DNA from the first homo ergaster (they were even before the first homo erectus). In our lifetime of learning, one is expected to absorb millions of bits of information to use in coping with life's trials and tribulations. A bit of generalizing is bound to be necessary to keep the mind's decision tree functional so that we're not frozen in fear at every turn when confronted with something new. In short, it's just human nature.

We learn stereotypes from our parents, our peers and our own experiences. Try as we might, we can't avoid them in ourselves or in the minds of others. It really doesn't matter what the stereotype is. Be it the frugality of Jews, self depreciating Chinese, Arrogant French, brilliantly technical Japanese, hard working lazy Mexicans (how'd they do that?), or irritating African/Americans, there is an element of truth on some level that became elevated in the collective conscience to become a generally accepted principal applicable to many of a particular geographic or ethnic subgroup of people. Not a truth, mind you, but a pseudo-truism. A generalization.

The Lil' Abner comic strip created the image of the hillbilly for the nation to enjoy. It was not purely imaginary. It was based on observation. The stereotype of the hillbilly, like all well publicized stereotypes, took on a life of its own and will probably never go away. We know that it is a mischaracterization of most of the people of N. Arkansas, yet we perpetuate it anyway whether we're from Smackover, Arkansas or Kalamazoo, Michigan. That's why we have a Dogpatch between Jasper and Harrison. Dogpatch is run down and unused as a business because of purely economic circumstances, but the hillbilly image that created Dogpatch lives on in the minds of those exposed to it, because on some level with some people it really is pretty accurate in its portrayal of Ozark living.

Personally, I think we should just go with it and be proud that we have a stereotype. Most regions don't have one. Ours gives people who have no reason to identify with us what-so-ever something to glom onto as a conversation starter, an ice breaker or just a point of common understanding. Think of how it would be if we had no stereotype for strangers to seize on.

"Hello, I'm from Nampa, Idaho."

"Oh. Don't know anything about it."

As opposed to:

"Hello, I'm from Jasper, Arkansas."

"Hillbilly huh? Where's your overalls? Whoah! You've got shoes on!"

"Nice of you to notice. You are quick, aren't you?"

Whatever the stereotype, we are a nation of individuals. If the stereotype hits too close to home, we might be a little uncomfortable with it and should perhaps look at self improvement. But, whoever you are, if you can be proud of what you are with everyone you meet, not only will you go far, but you wont mind the company behind the eyelids at night.
Very well said.
 
Old 07-26-2008, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Detroit Downriver
620 posts, read 1,826,550 times
Reputation: 402
Thanks Clay Lady. That means a lot and I appreciate it!
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