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Old 01-09-2018, 12:14 PM
 
183 posts, read 101,824 times
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So, my secondary home is in Pine Bluff and much of the yard is sandy...I researched and found that that is typical for the region. I have chestnut trees in the front and the backyard. I need to know what I'm able to plant. The type of soil somewhat reminds me of being in Beaumont, TX as a kid...but most folks didn't have gardens, just the vegetation that came with the house. I want to do something nice-something different.

The neighbor across the street has some sort of jacinta or palm-like plant scattered throughout the front yard. I like how she did that. I have a bit of a conundrum. Bear with me: I looove desert plants for their resilience, and lack of need for excessive water, but I haaaaate things that "stick you" if you touch it. The only exception I want to make is "creosote" and "aloe vera."

But what other options to I have for something "BEAUTIFUL" (like the desert lavender tree) that won't mind not being watered while I'm not around? Plus, this isn't California, and finding a place that has nice desert gardening stuff will be impossible. What LOCAL options do I have that are conducive to the soil type and climate.
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Old 01-09-2018, 12:33 PM
 
Location: The Natural State
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Without seeing it, I suspect the "palm-like" plant is native to south Arkansas. I don't know its' name but they are quite common and I've never seen one more than two feet tall.


I suggest you contact an Arkansas Extension Service Office. They have lots of printed info and will also help over the phone. I like what you are doing
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Old 01-09-2018, 12:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Old Fossil View Post
Without seeing it, I suspect the "palm-like" plant is native to south Arkansas. I don't know its' name but they are quite common and I've never seen one more than two feet tall.


I suggest you contact an Arkansas Extension Service Office. They have lots of printed info and will also help over the phone. I like what you are doing

Yep ! They're mini. I remember buying something similar at Lowes when I was a teen (in Hutto, TX) and it was something to the effect of a "jacinta" or something with "jac" in the name. They don't get tall at all. They're the 2 feet you said.
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Old 01-09-2018, 01:54 PM
 
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as mentioned, the "ark extension office" is a great place for information. also, there are two locally owned nursery type businesses just south of town on us65 south. they are actually located across the street from each other. they should be very helpful also.
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Old 01-09-2018, 02:20 PM
 
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Crepe myrtles, snowball bushes, and blue hydrangeas were all very successfully grown by my green-thumbed Conway grandfather, along with mimosas, fruit trees, Concord grapes, roses, bulbs, perennials and annuals, and a very productive vegetable garden: corn, pole beans, tomatoes, cucumbers, potatoes, melons, and more good fresh fruits and vegetables lowered grocery bills and were far tastier than store-bought fare. Actually, my grandfather sold the excess to a local mom and pop grocery, as I recall.

But he had been a successful farmer prior to retiring, had better soil, worked hard at gardening clear up to his 89th year, and maintained and used a compost heap. He also planted "by the signs".

If you can improve the soil and keep it appropriately watered and fertilized, you might eventually manage to do equally well, as Pine Bluff's climate is similar to that of Conway - perhaps a few degrees hotter in August, but otherwise not that different. So check with your county agent and your new neighbors, and see what would work. Good luck!
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Old 01-09-2018, 02:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1Patois View Post
Yep ! They're mini. I remember buying something similar at Lowes when I was a teen (in Hutto, TX) and it was something to the effect of a "jacinta" or something with "jac" in the name. They don't get tall at all. They're the 2 feet you said.
Jacarandas?
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Old 01-09-2018, 03:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Jacarandas?
Yes! That's gotta be it !
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Old 01-09-2018, 03:19 PM
 
183 posts, read 101,824 times
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Originally Posted by latunafish View Post
as mentioned, the "ark extension office" is a great place for information. also, there are two locally owned nursery type businesses just south of town on us65 south. they are actually located across the street from each other. they should be very helpful also.
Hmm is that where they just opened the new Loves station ?
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Old 01-09-2018, 04:38 PM
 
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How about azaleas? They thrive in Little Rock...
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Old 01-09-2018, 09:38 PM
 
Location: The Natural State
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Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
How about azaleas? They thrive in Little Rock...

Great thought. They'll be very happy in PB - and they are beautiful. There are two types; one that blooms once a year and one that blooms (more-or-less) all year long.
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