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Old 10-25-2009, 08:32 PM
 
20 posts, read 49,156 times
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Arkansas is one of the most taxed states in the country...very anti growth legislatures... one party dominates. The Tax Foundation - State and Local Tax Burdens: All States, One Year, 1977-2008
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Old 10-25-2009, 10:12 PM
 
112 posts, read 347,852 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HANNU View Post
The savings are in the property taxes (which are notoriously huge in Texas) and deodorant (you don't sweat as much in Arkansas).

Living in the hill country in Texas may be the trade off for FAT PROPERTY TAXES. But I live in Houston and in my view, unless you work in oil or medicine, there is absolutely no reason to be here. Boring, very unattractive (unless you like concrete, heat and traffic)

All that buzz about big houses for little money is only partially true. Big houses mostly built by illegal labor of poor quality on zero lots. This place is run-on subdivisions. PROPERTY TAXES are higher than in Florida (another no income tax state). Then half this city has a utility tax. I pay 1500 a year for a MUD tax. Then 1600 for windstorm insurance and 7500 for property taxes for a 250k home in cookie-cutter-ville.

My wife and I are going to head for Hot Springs the first of the year, where there is four seasons, plenty of countryside and nature and a quality of life. THAT alone, is a worthy trade of high PROPERTY TAXES, high CRIME, high HEAT and high TRAFFIC for INCOME TAXES.
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Old 10-26-2009, 12:46 AM
 
Location: Sequim, WA
783 posts, read 1,807,318 times
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There are a few things you might try. One...make a spreadsheet with columns for income tax, property tax, real estate tax, home owner insurance, auto insurance, utilities, sales tax and any other big issues you can think of...for the most likely TX and AR locations you are thinking about. See which location would impose the smaller burden for these big items.

Second...try sites such as the two links below and try to figure out which state is going to come out better in the coming years (it's probably as easy as forecasting the stock market). All the states are scrambling now to figure out where to cut and what to tax to make ends meet.

Recession Continues to Batter State Budgets; State Responses Could Slow Recovery — Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

An Update on State Budget Cuts — Center on Budget and Policy Priorities

Third...and most important IMO...where do you WANT to be?

Good Luck!!!!
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Old 10-26-2009, 05:05 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
67,253 posts, read 76,924,897 times
Reputation: 36433
Quote:
Originally Posted by atlantis7 View Post
Living in the hill country in Texas may be the trade off for FAT PROPERTY TAXES. But I live in Houston and in my view, unless you work in oil or medicine, there is absolutely no reason to be here. Boring, very unattractive (unless you like concrete, heat and traffic)

All that buzz about big houses for little money is only partially true. Big houses mostly built by illegal labor of poor quality on zero lots. This place is run-on subdivisions. PROPERTY TAXES are higher than in Florida (another no income tax state). Then half this city has a utility tax. I pay 1500 a year for a MUD tax. Then 1600 for windstorm insurance and 7500 for property taxes for a 250k home in cookie-cutter-ville.

My wife and I are going to head for Hot Springs the first of the year, where there is four seasons, plenty of countryside and nature and a quality of life. THAT alone, is a worthy trade of high PROPERTY TAXES, high CRIME, high HEAT and high TRAFFIC for INCOME TAXES.
well said, there is so much more to this than looking at a list of taxes. I did notice 2006 AR was like 18th, but according to the article hubby had gotten out of a financual magazine AR was 12th. I guess that shows us, these figures, sometimes are based on who knows what?

Nita
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Old 10-26-2009, 07:26 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 12,550,075 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
yes, but even those figures depend on so many variables. As I mentioned, much depends on your life style. Do you own a home or rent, are you in a high or low imcome lever? Are you 20 something or 80 something. I have never been a strong beleiver in these studies. To use them as a guide line is helpful, to use them as the final word can be misleading.

Nita

True.

Statistics are very meaningfull when you apply them directly to one's specific situation.

My son has a friend ( age 30) who relocated to Texas from Minnesota for a good job. He is very happy and in the process of buying a house near DFW. He says the cost of living isn't bad.

I however, am retired.
I did extensive research on Teaxas for re-location , but finally had to drop Texas from my search list. Too high real estate taxes.

The only areas that I come out ok ( cost of housing and real estate taxes ) are in Arkansas and Alabama and thus I have made several trips to those 2 states.
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Old 10-26-2009, 08:54 AM
 
1,661 posts, read 4,284,781 times
Reputation: 1262
Quote:
Originally Posted by atlantis7 View Post
Living in the hill country in Texas may be the trade off for FAT PROPERTY TAXES. But I live in Houston and in my view, unless you work in oil or medicine, there is absolutely no reason to be here. Boring, very unattractive (unless you like concrete, heat and traffic)

All that buzz about big houses for little money is only partially true. Big houses mostly built by illegal labor of poor quality on zero lots. This place is run-on subdivisions. PROPERTY TAXES are higher than in Florida (another no income tax state). Then half this city has a utility tax. I pay 1500 a year for a MUD tax. Then 1600 for windstorm insurance and 7500 for property taxes for a 250k home in cookie-cutter-ville.

My wife and I are going to head for Hot Springs the first of the year, where there is four seasons, plenty of countryside and nature and a quality of life. THAT alone, is a worthy trade of high PROPERTY TAXES, high CRIME, high HEAT and high TRAFFIC for INCOME TAXES.
Reading your posts I see you have prioritized what you do and don't want in your environment and have made a reasonable decision of where to look for it.

If you go back and read through older posts on the area, you'll find quite a bit of discussion here about Hot Springs.

If you haven't noticed by now, you will also find posts that will advise you against Hot Springs, because it is *still* located in Arkansas, and you will still have to return to Texas to get a pair of $80 blue jeans or a $7 cup of coffee, because, as we all know, Arkansas has *nothing*.

I see you have experienced the concrete jungle, as many of us have, and are ready to take an easier breath somewhere that allows you to watch the sunset when it's not filtered by smog for once.

Have you spent much time in the area? The tourist season is pretty much coming to a close, which means slower times and less businesses open for many of the vacation areas, my locale in Arkansas included. Hot Springs has a large tourist business, so actually the off-season would be a good time to relocate as the needed services are nearly so busy.

Good luck on the transition, and I think you'll find a lot of good folks on this forum that will help as they can.
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Old 10-26-2009, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
67,253 posts, read 76,924,897 times
Reputation: 36433
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
True.

Statistics are very meaningfull when you apply them directly to one's specific situation.

My son has a friend ( age 30) who relocated to Texas from Minnesota for a good job. He is very happy and in the process of buying a house near DFW. He says the cost of living isn't bad.

I however, am retired.
I did extensive research on Teaxas for re-location , but finally had to drop Texas from my search list. Too high real estate taxes.

The only areas that I come out ok ( cost of housing and real estate taxes ) are in Arkansas and Alabama and thus I have made several trips to those 2 states.
And that is why we are here, one reason and why our daughter and her husband, who have not yet retired are buying a home here in the next few months. They will retire as soon as they can. Her husband has a finance degree, knows exactly how to use charts, etc in the proper way and know they can afford a lot more here than what they can if they stay in Texas.

Nita
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Old 12-24-2017, 12:33 PM
 
1 posts, read 354 times
Reputation: 10
You pay tax on your vehicle in Texas when you get your plates thru the dmv. @$50 on my old pick up in Dallas Co.and you pay $28 for your inspection annually. Don’t forget toll fees. They add up too if you use the toll roads and lanes. In Dallas Co there are many. They are wonderful but they are expensive. $5 one way if at peak hours as express lanes on LBJ . So round trip form Garland to Dfw to work. 10 Bucks! Used daily for a month $200/ month. Ouch!
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Old 12-24-2017, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
67,253 posts, read 76,924,897 times
Reputation: 36433
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bussey50 View Post
You pay tax on your vehicle in Texas when you get your plates thru the dmv. @$50 on my old pick up in Dallas Co.and you pay $28 for your inspection annually. Donít forget toll fees. They add up too if you use the toll roads and lanes. In Dallas Co there are many. They are wonderful but they are expensive. $5 one way if at peak hours as express lanes on LBJ . So round trip form Garland to Dfw to work. 10 Bucks! Used daily for a month $200/ month. Ouch!
ouch is right!!!!!
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Old 12-24-2017, 01:54 PM
 
Location: plano
5,763 posts, read 7,166,582 times
Reputation: 4782
Ive compared Ar to DFW area from many aspects. On cost of living, there is a tool by sperling which compares different location costs of living at a city level.

The big savings in say Bentonville vs Plano where I live now is driven lower by lower home prices according to this calculator. Remember property taxes are a function of home value so if you can live in a 25% lower cost home of the same quality and size in Ar then your property taxes will be much lower in Ar. Secondly, as I recall, grocery and gasoline costs were lower too. I suspect its due to Walmart dominating the good and gasoline market in NWA.

The overall cost of living was lower in Bentonville by about 25% per this comparison tool. It does not address taxes separately so I decided to looks to see if I could find a home to replace my current one for as much less as the calculator showed, I did not find that to be the case. Home prices were cheaper but by maybe 20% tops. Then I compared taxes for my situation, I am retired but with an upper middle income level. My property tax in Plano is less than my combined property tax and income tax in Ar for the same priced home as I now have, using that price in both locations. But if I lowered my home price in Ar, by the 20% that combined big state and locat taxes were about the same for both locations. However I would have significantly more money to spend on other things by paying 20% less for a home.

I was surprised to see the tax costs so high for my situation in Ar. I looked at other states and determined that from a tax standpoint Tn is definitely a lot lower for my situation than either tx or Ar. So I am planning a trip to Knoxville area to check it out as I did NWA. I am looking at the mountains of SC as well thugh they cost me more than Knoxville does tax wise but I see lower home prices in SC compared to Knox.

The bottom line is look at the details for your situation. There is not a general rule that holds true in all cases. Be careful to factor in the new tax law too which limits state and location deductions to $10k for a married couple. Also remember loving where you life is not only about tax costs although that is a big item to me, climate and medical facilities and access to family were big ones to me. We are dealing with some wife health issues now and our plans to consider anywhere new are on hold until we settle things down some then we will travel to Tn and SC for see if they fit as well as NWA fit us. We might have one move at most left in us at 70 years of age to the next one must be the one.
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