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Old 06-18-2019, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Honolulu
1,356 posts, read 546,761 times
Reputation: 1102

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Quote:
Originally Posted by maglev101 View Post
during british rule, locals were considered somewhat 2nd class citizens in their own land. i think a sort of light version of apartheid. i remember watching a ted koppel program where he recalled his trip to hong kong. he felt embarrassed during a trip to the post office there. the attendant ushered him from the back of the line to the front (skipping a bunch of people), simply b/c he was white (presumed british).
What year was that?

By late 1970s, any colonial legacy had vanished in Hong Kong. The British did not enjoy any privilege like going through the back of the line to the front.

In fact, the last two decades of British rule in Hong Kong was really benign -- far superior to any administration after 1997. Did you see 2 million people demonstrating against the British before 1997?

Hong Kong is still a colony after 1997. It just changed from a British colony to a Chinese colony.
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Old 06-18-2019, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,159,509 times
Reputation: 9478
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian_Lee View Post
Before 1997, all the land in Hong Kong were Crown Land with different expiry day. On Hong Kong Island, the land one owned was good for 999 years -- perpetuity.

All the land in New Territories were only good until 1997 when the lease expired. That is the principal reason why UK had to talk with China in early '80s.

After 1997, all the land will expire in 2047 and theoretically will go back to the government.
Interesting that HK Island was supposed to stay for 999 years! I really love that part of HK.
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Old 06-19-2019, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Honolulu
1,356 posts, read 546,761 times
Reputation: 1102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Interesting that HK Island was supposed to stay for 999 years! I really love that part of HK.
But a lot of those Victorian era buildings have long gone. Seldom is there a city like Hong Kong which is so keen to destroy its past
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Old 06-20-2019, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Boston, MA
1,857 posts, read 3,419,608 times
Reputation: 1801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian_Lee View Post
What year was that?

By late 1970s, any colonial legacy had vanished in Hong Kong. The British did not enjoy any privilege like going through the back of the line to the front.

In fact, the last two decades of British rule in Hong Kong was really benign -- far superior to any administration after 1997. Did you see 2 million people demonstrating against the British before 1997?

Hong Kong is still a colony after 1997. It just changed from a British colony to a Chinese colony.
I think Maglev's argument is more of an economic argument and not a political one. My mother grew up in HK during the 50's and 60's. Her family was very poor with limited financial means and that of course meant she and her siblings grew up not being able to speak proper English and feeling very inferior to both Europeans and richer Chinese. She told me she never dared to walk into the Central District, Lane Crawford or Wing On's Department Store much less landmarks like the Mandarin Oriental or the Peninsula Hotel and she probably had a point because back then if you did not look the part and did not speak proper English in those places, you sure as heck weren't going to be served. Gweilos often if not always got a free pass because the Chinese locals all thought they were all rich and important. So that Ted Koppel incident could very well have happened and could even have happened in more recent decades. Even now, my mother has the ridiculous notion that Whites are superior to the Chinese but that notion was ingrained in her from growing up in post WWII Hong Kong. Remember, there were no working class British people like factory workers, street cleaners, taxi drivers, etc. in Hong Kong back in those days. All the working class folks were Chinese and all the British were pretty much financiers, bankers, government officials, corporate bosses, or other high status positions (with the exception perhaps of a few humble Christian missionaries). Yes, gradually things changed but slowly though.

I do agree with you that Hong Kong had a very steady and friendly governance during the 70's, 80's, and 90's but that was probably because the British were already tiring of governing Hong Kong and the local people including tycoons like Li Ka Shing were ascending quickly in society.
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