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Old 07-05-2010, 02:55 AM
 
610 posts, read 2,756,054 times
Reputation: 787

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About a month ago I traveled to China. After staying in China for a month my visa was set to expire, so I decided to go to HK and then come back to mainland China to reset my visa.

Although I was only in HK for one day, I fell in love with the HK Special Admin Area. I love it there. It was like a breath of fresh air from mainland China. It seems like most people speak English and it is very westernized.

It seems like HK has a nice "feel" to it.

Is there anyone on here who either lives in HK or knows a lot about the city? If so, what is your opinion? Is HK a decent place?

I know a lot of people say it is expensive, but it seems like my American dollar went pretty far in HK.
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Old 07-06-2010, 03:34 PM
 
11,879 posts, read 32,912,793 times
Reputation: 8626
Quote:
Originally Posted by heeha View Post
About a month ago I traveled to China. After staying in China for a month my visa was set to expire, so I decided to go to HK and then come back to mainland China to reset my visa.

Although I was only in HK for one day, I fell in love with the HK Special Admin Area. I love it there. It was like a breath of fresh air from mainland China. It seems like most people speak English and it is very westernized.

It seems like HK has a nice "feel" to it.

Is there anyone on here who either lives in HK or knows a lot about the city? If so, what is your opinion? Is HK a decent place?

I know a lot of people say it is expensive, but it seems like my American dollar went pretty far in HK.
I absolutely ADORE Hong Kong!! I have had the good fortune of living there when I was younger and going back almost every year.

Rent in HK is outrageous, but the day-to-day cost of living is very cheap. Eating out, as you probably noticed, is very inexpensive compared to eating out in a large American city, and public transportation is so cheap it's funny. And taxes in HK are ridiculously low. There's no sales tax and, I believe, the income tax rate tops out at only 15%.

HK is like taking the best of New York, London, Rio, and Shanghai and putting it in one beautiful location (islands, beaches, mountains) minus the graffiti, crime, and trash that those other cities have. Unfortunately, mainland China's go-go growth-at-any-cost has put hundreds of factories outside of HK's borders making air pollution a major concern.

I have seriously considered moving back to HK, and it's still something I'm probably going to pursue one of these days.

Nowhere else in the world can you be smack in the middle of one of the world's greatest cities one minute and then be lounging on a tropical beach, hiking on top of a mountain, or riding a roller coaster 30 minutes later. In Hong Kong you've got some of the most brilliant architecture in the modern world as well as some of the world's greatest engineering marvels. You've got Buddhist temples and a Mormon temple, mopeds and Lamborghinis, 5-star restaurants and noodle carts, fast-food Chinese and fast-food French chains, luxury department stores and open-air markets, oppulent mansions and humble fishing villages. It's got frenetic neighborhoods where people live like sardines and the most brilliant skyline on the planet, but also over 200 islands which are mostly deserted. And all that in only 400 square miles.

Here are some pictures of some of my favorite things about Hong Kong.

Repulse Bay (just on the other side of that mountain is Hong Kong's famous skyline)


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/26/54...e230b2f33e.jpg


Jumbo Floating Restaurant


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/146/3...15449d9fb1.jpg


Cheung Chau Island (no cars allowed)


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/17/20...ed9146.jpg?v=0


Big Buddha on Lantau Island


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3188/...fcdc6a.jpg?v=0


Double-decker street cars


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/97/21...9890cc6c84.jpg


Star Ferry (the most fun you can have for only 25 cents)


http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1355/...5f38439e67.jpg


Mountains everywhere


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/156/3...911031.jpg?v=0


Ocean Park


http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2757/...35a3ac1046.jpg


http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1281/...7fc3a1.jpg?v=0


and the world's most awesome skyline


http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3123/...4c4a6faac3.jpg


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/33/58...961175bf_o.jpg


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/248/5...e7c6e2c131.jpg


http://farm1.static.flickr.com/54/17...b59f620154.jpg
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Old 07-08-2010, 10:04 AM
 
254 posts, read 514,645 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heeha View Post
I know a lot of people say it is expensive, but it seems like my American dollar went pretty far in HK.
real estate is very expensive.
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Old 07-15-2010, 01:24 PM
 
164 posts, read 331,509 times
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so there is a lot of english spoken there?
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Old 07-15-2010, 01:54 PM
 
11,879 posts, read 32,912,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drose1 View Post
so there is a lot of english spoken there?
Yes. Street signs are in both English and Chinese. Most taxi drivers know enough English to get you around. Outside of the tourist areas there's not as much English spoken, but it's never hard to find someone who does speak it.
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Old 07-15-2010, 04:25 PM
 
164 posts, read 331,509 times
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so if one were to live there they still should know chinese?
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Old 07-15-2010, 04:39 PM
 
5,116 posts, read 4,624,706 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by maglev101 View Post
real estate is very expensive.
I had been told by a man (who had spent a good part of his adult life in Hong Kong as a shipping company executive) that during the time that HK was a British possession all of the land was owned by the British Crown. In order to use the land for anything (farming, housing, hotels, factories, what have you) one first had to rent the land from the government. It was one of the reasons why the taxes were so low in Hong Kong - the colonial government got a good deal of its income from rents.

I was under the impression that after the handover to China, Hong Kong was allowed to continue operating under the British model, which would mean that now all land is owned by the PRC and still must be leased.

Has this changed? Are people in Hong Kong now allowed to purchase the land?
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Old 07-16-2010, 01:05 AM
 
3 posts, read 5,787 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djmilf View Post
I had been told by a man (who had spent a good part of his adult life in Hong Kong as a shipping company executive) that during the time that HK was a British possession all of the land was owned by the British Crown. In order to use the land for anything (farming, housing, hotels, factories, what have you) one first had to rent the land from the government. It was one of the reasons why the taxes were so low in Hong Kong - the colonial government got a good deal of its income from rents.

I was under the impression that after the handover to China, Hong Kong was allowed to continue operating under the British model, which would mean that now all land is owned by the PRC and still must be leased.

Has this changed? Are people in Hong Kong now allowed to purchase the land?
yes, most of what you said is correct. to some extent, HK is a bit different from the mainland China, cause it was the colony of UK before 1997, and now after the handover, HK is still allowed to operate under capitalism, while the mainland socialism. and this is just the "one country, two system"policy.
yet unlike what you said, people now in HK needn't lease the land only. If you can offord, you can purchase it.
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Old 07-23-2010, 12:02 AM
 
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Most locals only speak little English but that's okay because they know some basic English which is good enough for most tourist.
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Old 07-23-2010, 12:41 PM
 
5,091 posts, read 8,067,944 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drose1 View Post
so if one were to live there they still should know chinese?
I think it would be fair to say that knowing the language might not be essential, but it would certainly provide a big advantage.
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