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Old 06-24-2011, 06:38 AM
 
Location: Big Island of Hawaii & HOT BuOYS Sailing Vessel
4,953 posts, read 1,962,042 times
Reputation: 1813

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I've lived in both Thailand and Malaysia. I love the people more in Thailand, the food, and the Thai language. I'm in Malaysia now and miss these things, however, in Malaysia I'm finding that immigration issues are less of a problem. One secret I have found is to not buy a home. Rather, purchase a boat. My boat is essentially a 3 bedroom 2 bath floating home with AC, full size kitchen, and only a very modest dock charge that is cheaper than a condo association dues.

I haven't bothered with immigration since American's get 3 months each time they enter. When my 3 months draw near I go on a short trip and get another three months. Just popping over the border does the trick. This isn't possible in Thailand.
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Old 06-24-2011, 08:23 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,951 posts, read 36,191,166 times
Reputation: 9484
Quote:
Originally Posted by chielgirl View Post
Chiang Mai is changing quite a bit. It's becoming very noisy and polluted. Traffic sucks.
Funny how we find a place that we love and proceed to destroy it.

I've been to CM over a dozen times and love it, but areas outside of the town would be better. There are numerous villages around the north to live in. Perhaps you could look at Chiang Rai also.
I went to Chiang Mai in 1996. Most of the roads were dirt, and I always felt I was choking on exhaust fumes. Loud traffic as well.

I always wondered if they paved a lot of the roads, and it became better for awhile. I also remember choking on fumes and dirt roads in BKK back in '96 as well...and then going back other years, and more paved city roads made it better as well.

But now days...probably just so much more traffic even.
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Old 06-24-2011, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,951 posts, read 36,191,166 times
Reputation: 9484
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cebucats View Post
I lived it the Philippines for nearly ten years after Malaysia. Folks were also friendly there and you did have to stay mostly in the Cebu area for safety.
Cebu is very comfortable. Actually, I found pretty much everywhere in Visayas to be great. I also like Davao and Cagayan de Oro in Mindinao.

There is very little I like about Luzon. I always felt once you got on that flight southward away from the capital, the Philippines was amazing.

Too bad Manila is the first taste and last taste everyone has of those beautiful islands.
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Old 06-24-2011, 09:29 PM
 
5,096 posts, read 8,074,685 times
Reputation: 3066
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I went to Chiang Mai in 1996. Most of the roads were dirt, and I always felt I was choking on exhaust fumes. Loud traffic as well.

I always wondered if they paved a lot of the roads, and it became better for awhile. I also remember choking on fumes and dirt roads in BKK back in '96 as well...and then going back other years, and more paved city roads made it better as well.

But now days...probably just so much more traffic even.
Back in the 90s a lot of the paved roads in the areas near the Ping River, elsewhere too, seemed to have lots of potholes. Developed housing projects in the 'burbs, roads were in much better shape, maybe because they're concrete and newer. The Koolpunt home projects in the Hang Dong district comes to mind. The growth of new housing communities around the outskirts of Chiang Mai is amazing. The roads around Chiang Mai seem much better now. Chiang Mai was pretty noisy and plenty of fumes in the early 90s, but nothing in comparison to BKK.

In BKK on Soi 8, and other sois off Sukhumvit Road, were pretty bumpy and dusty with loads of potholes and gravel. There was no BTS Skytrain back then too. Now it goes out as far as Phrakanong district, at least. I think its planned to eventually go out to or near the airport. BKK is still very hazy from traffic and factory fumes though.
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Old 06-24-2011, 11:13 PM
 
44 posts, read 98,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Cebu is very comfortable. Actually, I found pretty much everywhere in Visayas to be great. I also like Davao and Cagayan de Oro in Mindinao.

There is very little I like about Luzon. I always felt once you got on that flight southward away from the capital, the Philippines was amazing.

Too bad Manila is the first taste and last taste everyone has of those beautiful islands.

Yes, I agree about Cagayan de Oro in Mindinao. I spent a month visiting my girlfriend's relatives there until they warned me that a kidnap gang was watching me. I retreated back to Cebu.

Spent my first and fourth years in Manila area. Hated it! I would choose the jungles of Bohol over Manila. Lived in Bohol for six months until the NPA started asking for their "revolutionary taxes" in the middle of a jungle path one day. I told them my "wife" had already paid the tax. Friendly bunch of folks with their AK 47s. They won't hurt foreigners though, especially an Americano.

There are now direct international flights in and out of Cebu. Can avoid Manila that way. Immigration is very corrupt there so be careful when visiting. I had one tried to "shake" me down in SM City mall one day in my eighth year. I had just returned from Thailand but my Filipino girlfriend put him in his place.

Still overall a nice place and affordable.
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Old 06-24-2011, 11:18 PM
 
44 posts, read 98,512 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
51% Thai ownership.
Same in the Philippines; 51% has to be owned by Filipino.
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Old 06-24-2011, 11:34 PM
 
44 posts, read 98,512 times
Reputation: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by pbmaise View Post
I've lived in both Thailand and Malaysia. I love the people more in Thailand, the food, and the Thai language. I'm in Malaysia now and miss these things, however, in Malaysia I'm finding that immigration issues are less of a problem. One secret I have found is to not buy a home. Rather, purchase a boat. My boat is essentially a 3 bedroom 2 bath floating home with AC, full size kitchen, and only a very modest dock charge that is cheaper than a condo association dues.

I haven't bothered with immigration since American's get 3 months each time they enter. When my 3 months draw near I go on a short trip and get another three months. Just popping over the border does the trick. This isn't possible in Thailand.

Interesting. Sounds like a good plan.

What size boat do you have to fit all that into it?

Do you worry about pirates?

Did you buy the boat there and if I may ask ... what did you pay for it?

I was at the end of my 3 months in late '96 so popped down to Singapore by train from KL. I had been told that this "sometimes" works but at other times immigration looks too closely at the passport and will reject entry if there are too many entries too often. That's what happen to me, but since I had a condo, my cats and everything in KL the immigration gave me 30 days to clear it all out. Such a hassle, so I went to the Philippines where I could extend up to a year before taking a vacation out of country for three days.

Last edited by Cebucats; 06-24-2011 at 11:36 PM.. Reason: word missing
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Old 06-25-2011, 05:27 AM
 
Location: Alderwood, Washington State
109 posts, read 128,374 times
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pbmaise- sounds cool, have any pictures of the boat?
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Old 06-25-2011, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Earth
24,639 posts, read 24,841,505 times
Reputation: 11318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I went to Chiang Mai in 1996. Most of the roads were dirt, and I always felt I was choking on exhaust fumes. Loud traffic as well.

I always wondered if they paved a lot of the roads, and it became better for awhile. I also remember choking on fumes and dirt roads in BKK back in '96 as well...and then going back other years, and more paved city roads made it better as well.

But now days...probably just so much more traffic even.
Yeah, roads are paved, they're burying some of the electrical wires.
Very commercial, including several Starbucks.

Aargh, but I still love it.
At least I hope I do, I've been there 20 times.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
Back in the 90s a lot of the paved roads in the areas near the Ping River, elsewhere too, seemed to have lots of potholes. Developed housing projects in the 'burbs, roads were in much better shape, maybe because they're concrete and newer. The Koolpunt home projects in the Hang Dong district comes to mind. The growth of new housing communities around the outskirts of Chiang Mai is amazing. The roads around Chiang Mai seem much better now. Chiang Mai was pretty noisy and plenty of fumes in the early 90s, but nothing in comparison to BKK.

In BKK on Soi 8, and other sois off Sukhumvit Road, were pretty bumpy and dusty with loads of potholes and gravel. There was no BTS Skytrain back then too. Now it goes out as far as Phrakanong district, at least. I think its planned to eventually go out to or near the airport. BKK is still very hazy from traffic and factory fumes though.
How times change!
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Old 06-25-2011, 11:03 AM
 
5,096 posts, read 8,074,685 times
Reputation: 3066
Quote:
Originally Posted by chielgirl View Post
Yeah, roads are paved, they're burying some of the electrical wires.
Very commercial, including several Starbucks.

Aargh, but I still love it.
At least I hope I do, I've been there 20 times.



How times change!
You're absolutely right. Things really have changed over time. Much faster than I had expected. The Koolpunt districts in Chiang Mai seem very notable to me. I had some Thai friends who lived in Project 3 or 4 a couple of decades ago. It was very nice area and not overly crowded. Project 5 was still in the planning stage as I recall. Now, I'm not sure how many project sections have been completed, but the number of houses is pretty astonishing scattered over an huge area. Koolpunt district still pretty much of a gated community, but now includes its own good-sized centralized shopping center (almost like a mall) and has an international school for kids.

On the east side of the city, new house construction projects are springing up like mushrooms. New houses are going up all over around Chiang Mai at a rate that seems astonishing to me.

In some ways, the fast rate of changes in Thailand seems kind of sad, leaving behind a lot of nostalgia of how it used to be. But on the other hand, there's much more convenience available at local scales now than ever before. That said, there are still many, many areas around the country that haven't changed much. In the province of Saraburi there's been plenty of modernization, but our place is still located on a dusty, bumpy, winding, dirt road to get to it. Nearby houses are somewhat modern, but are not tightly packed together. It's pretty rural. We're seriously mulling over the idea of moving to Chiang Mai though because we really like it.
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