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Old 11-23-2012, 04:44 PM
 
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It is a big country with hundreds of different cultures and scores of languages.
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Old 12-01-2012, 01:59 PM
kyh
 
Location: Malaysia & Singapore
383 posts, read 1,061,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nabartek View Post
Which "Chinese" culture do you mean? The Chinese culture in Southeast Asia, the post-Cultural revolution China Chinese culture, or the North American Chinese culture?

I think the SEA Chinese culture is cool. Mainland Chinese culture. Not so.

Southeast Asia Chinese still keeps a lot of festivals that the mainlanders have forsaken. It is easier for a Philippine Chinese to relate to an Indonesian Chinese than to a mainland Chinese.

The wisdom of the ancient Chinese is more seen in Southeast Asian Chinese than the mainland Chinese
Indonesian Chinese culture was being suppressed in the past as well. The liveliest Southeast Asian Chinese cultures would be found in Malaysia and Singapore, followed by Thailand and the surrounding nations. Most Filipino and Indonesian Chinese have assimilated to the dominant cultures of their adopted nations, and they don't really speak the language, save for some older generations.
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Old 12-01-2012, 02:07 PM
 
Location: Charlotte North Carolina
1,527 posts, read 2,324,730 times
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Originally Posted by kyh View Post
Indonesian Chinese culture was being suppressed in the past as well. The liveliest Southeast Asian Chinese cultures would be found in Malaysia and Singapore, followed by Thailand and the surrounding nations. Most Filipino and Indonesian Chinese have assimilated to the dominant cultures of their adopted nations, and they don't really speak the language, save for some older generations.
chinese-filipinos do speak the chinese language still...you never heard of the special chinese schools that chinese-filipino families send their kids to

I highly doubt chinese-indonesians are fully assimilated....just a 40 years ago indonesians tried kicking them out or killed them

Last edited by ejay1; 12-01-2012 at 02:20 PM..
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Old 12-01-2012, 02:45 PM
kyh
 
Location: Malaysia & Singapore
383 posts, read 1,061,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ejay1 View Post
chinese-filipinos do speak the chinese language still...you never heard of the special chinese schools that chinese-filipino families send their kids to

I highly doubt chinese-indonesians are fully assimilated....just a 40 years ago indonesians tried kicking them out or killed them
I don't think most Filipino Chinese speak the language (esp the young) as a first language and on a daily basis (to friends, relatives, family etc) - correct me if am wrong. I guess English and Tagalog/Filipino have supplanted that position. And most Filipino Chinese have adopted Spanish or English names like the rest of the population - Alberto, Fernando etc. Catholicism and Evangelical faiths also largely supplant the traditional Chinese religions within the community, and Chinese cultural traces have largely diminished.

Indonesian Chinese (esp those in Jakarta and in Java) underwent a tough period of discrimination under Suharto's presidentship. Many were forced to adopt Indonesian-sounding names - Halim for Lim, Soekotjo for Su, and so on. Chinese schools, media, and languages were all banned. The result is the loss of Chinese language and customs among the younger generations. Only since the 2000s has the ban been lifted and a nationwide revival of the culture.
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Old 12-01-2012, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Charlotte North Carolina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyh View Post
I don't think most Filipino Chinese speak the language (esp the young) as a first language and on a daily basis (to friends, relatives, family etc) - correct me if am wrong. I guess English and Tagalog/Filipino have supplanted that position. And most Filipino Chinese have adopted Spanish or English names like the rest of the population - Alberto, Fernando etc. Catholicism and Evangelical faiths also largely supplant the traditional Chinese religions within the community, and Chinese cultural traces have largely diminished.

Indonesian Chinese (esp those in Jakarta and in Java) underwent a tough period of discrimination under Suharto's presidentshi. Many were forced to adopt Indonesian-sounding names - Halim for Lim, Soekotjo for Su, and so on. Chinese schools, media, and languages were all banned. The result is the loss of Chinese language and customs among the younger generations. Only since the 2000s has the ban been lifted and a nationwide revival of the culture.

first language of chinese-filipino youth is actually english....though they do pick up on filipino language...just like how chinese in latin america speak spanish...or filipinos living in germany can speak german

not all....just a few did....and even then those surnames arent even real spanish surnames....tell me if Dizon is spanish....its not....its specifically a chinese-filipino name meant to sound spanish

besides 90% of chinese-filipinos still have surnames like soon, uy, lim, Go

lol alot of chinese-filipinos are christian...so are alot of chinese anywhere....hell there are even chinese jews in kaifeng...that doesnt mean they assimilated if they became christian
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Old 12-01-2012, 03:30 PM
kyh
 
Location: Malaysia & Singapore
383 posts, read 1,061,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ejay1 View Post
first language of chinese-filipino youth is actually english....though they do pick up on filipino language...just like how chinese in latin america speak spanish...or filipinos living in germany can speak german

not all....just a few did....and even then those surnames arent even real spanish surnames....tell me if Dizon is spanish....its not....its specifically a chinese-filipino name meant to sound spanish

besides 90% of chinese-filipinos still have surnames like soon, uy, lim, Go

lol alot of chinese-filipinos are christian...so are alot of chinese anywhere....hell there are even chinese jews in kaifeng...that doesnt mean they assimilated if they became christian
What am trying to point out is, most Filipino Chinese have become culturally and linguistically similar to their compatriots rather than with the Chinese culture. How many of them still regularly practise the Chinese customs? How many know of the famed Chinese poets, the poetries, the history of China, the dynasties, the epic stories and legends, or even write their names in Chinese? Probably very few. Moreover, most of them are leading lives no much different from their Filipino neighbours. Assimilation it is, just like the descendants of the 18/19/20th-century immigrants in America (e.g. Germans who no longer speak German, and completely embrace the Anglo-American way of life).
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Old 12-01-2012, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Charlotte North Carolina
1,527 posts, read 2,324,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyh View Post
What am trying to point out is, most Filipino Chinese have become culturally and linguistically similar to their compatriots rather than with the Chinese culture. How many of them still regularly practise the Chinese customs? How many know of the famed Chinese poets, the poetries, the history of China, the dynasties, the epic stories and legends, or even write their names in Chinese? Probably very few. Moreover, most of them are leading lives no much different from their Filipino neighbours. Assimilation it is, just like the descendants of the 18/19/20th-century immigrants in America (e.g. Germans who no longer speak German, and completely embrace the Anglo-American way of life).

as far as I know...they do

they learn such things in the chinese schools they go to in the Philippines


I dont think living in walled communities...keeping only close chinese friends...constantly talk behind the backs of filipino colleagues in their chinese dialect with other chinese....and complaining about filipinos all the time would be considered as assimilating

anyways this is probably due to the friction between chinese and southeast asians....chinese have a much easier time assimilating in africa, jamaica, latin america from what I see
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Old 12-01-2012, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,149,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyh View Post
I don't think most Filipino Chinese speak the language (esp the young) as a first language and on a daily basis (to friends, relatives, family etc) - correct me if am wrong.
I just asked my wife who has some chinese blood, and is Filipina. She said Fukien and Mandarin.

My wife's aunts speaks Chinese, and she remembers her great-grandmother often speaking pure Chinese when she got mad.

But, that being said, neither my wife nor her siblings speak any Chinese.
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Old 12-01-2012, 09:57 PM
kyh
 
Location: Malaysia & Singapore
383 posts, read 1,061,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I just asked my wife who has some chinese blood, and is Filipina. She said Fukien and Mandarin.

My wife's aunts speaks Chinese, and she remembers her great-grandmother often speaking pure Chinese when she got mad.

But, that being said, neither my wife nor her siblings speak any Chinese.
Many have assimilated into the mainstream Filipino society, that's why. The only Chinese identity they bear today is the partial amount of Chinese genes in their blood and some faint Chinese customs that are passed down to them. Most would probably eat, play, pray, and live the exact same way as their native Filipino neighbours.
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Old 12-02-2012, 05:50 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,361,353 times
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I actually find it interesting that people think it's weird that the Chinese Indonesians etc assimilate. The historical situation is of course different to that of the US, but it seems you don't seem them totally or mostly assimilating like say second generation immigrants in Western countries do. While I wasn't even born in Australia (I came at a young age) I can only speak English. Apparently I should also know Mandarin, and sure it would be useful and I wouldn't mind learning more, but why should I have any more reason to speak Mandarin? My ancestors didn't even speak Mandarin, they spoke a 'dialect' of Chinese which is as different from Mandarin as English is to German. But I guess discrimination etc is unfortunate, Chinese culture is alive and well in places, but I also think it's good like in Thailand when they just consider themselves Thai because they are Thai not just foreigners living in another land, like the Chinese were typically considered as labourers etc.
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