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Old 05-26-2009, 12:58 PM
 
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Here is my personal opinion BTW on cities and japan vs america.

I personally am not a city person i prefer more suburban and green lifestyle, so for me personally i prefer USA and american cities over japanese cities. But since NYC is very dense and a real city by japanese standards, if i had to choose between the 2 (keep in mind i would choose a more rural american city over any japanese city) i would choose tokyo. Simply because of the quality of life, crime etc.

 
Old 05-26-2009, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Back home in Kaguawagpjpa.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NihonKitty View Post
^

Here is tokyo in 1905. Looks like tokyo had some form of trains even back then lol. I dont know what theyre called in english but i think san francisco still uses this kind today.
They're cable cars.

It looks like San Francisco, too.
 
Old 05-26-2009, 02:08 PM
 
8 posts, read 46,459 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NihonKitty View Post
I said NYC has the most international tourists while i said tokyo has more tourists foreign AND japanese combined. So that doesnt disprove what i said. 35 million figure for times square is americans and foreigners. But i do agree NYC has more international tourists.

And your link about times square still doesnt prove anything. That picture i posted is ginza not shibuya. There is absolute no proof that tokyo districts took the idea from times square. It's simple, large japanese companies wanted to advertise their products to the areas with many pedestrians thats it. Shibuya is not the only one, and its definately not the best one. Harajuku, shinjuku in themselves are better. Shibuya is compared to time square because it looks more like times square and the lay out is more similar to times square then the other districts. But if were talking about neon lights and screens shibuya isnt the best in tokyo.
and i asked, so? even if the statistics you posted is valid (uh..im still waiting for the link) it only shows a lot of japanese visit tokyo. so? also we should look at outside opinions to answer the question OP asks. so the number of foreign tourists visiting the cities each year is the best indicator. again, whats your point?

shibuyas nickname is 'times square of tokyo'. i think this proves that NYC influenced tokyo along with many other major cities. and if youve been to both cities, it should be obvious. i can probably find more proof but i dont really care to scour the internet over a dumb internet argument. i have no idea if the pic you provided is of ginza or shibuya or if the pic was taken in 1960 because you never gave me the link, so as far as im concerned the pic doesnt prove anything.

okay, im out. i wanted to show that nyc was hugely influential to a lot of major cities and i think ive done that if you read the links i posted.

Last edited by Cornerguy1; 05-26-2009 at 07:45 PM.. Reason: orphaned material removed
 
Old 05-26-2009, 02:15 PM
 
895 posts, read 2,146,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 63estr View Post
and i asked, so? even if the statistics you posted is valid (uh..im still waiting for the link) it doesnt prove anything other than a lot of japanese visit tokyo. also we should look at outside opinions to answer the question OP asks. the number of foreign tourists visiting the cities each year is probably the best indicator. so again, whats your point?

shibuya's nickname is 'times square of tokyo'. i think this proves that NYC influenced tokyo along with many other major cities. if youve been to both cities, this should be obvious. i can probably find more proof but i dont really care to scour the internet over a dumb internet argument. and i have no idea if the pic you provided is of ginza or shibuya or if the pic was taken in 1960 because you never provided the link, so as far as im concerned the pic doesnt prove anything.

okay, im out. i wanted to show that nyc was hugely influential to a lot of major cities and i think ive done that if you read the links i posted.
Once again i said last page that i agree NYC has more foreign tourists so for the third time what are you trying to prove?.

And no all it shows is that it influenced shibuya, and if anything all it is, is an american name for a japanese district. I can call times square NYC's "shinjuku" if i wanted to. Just because americans like to call it the times square of tokyo doesnt mean anything. Shibuya is the least impressive of when it comes to neon lights and screens in tokyo. And i've never heard a single japanese person call shibuya "times square of tokyo". Shibuya is a tiny dot in the metropolis of tokyo.

Link for tourists is here dont know why you would want it.
東京の観…‰:

Ginza here.
Japan's Neon Vision Lights Up the Night - Windows Live


Quote:
the number of foreign tourists visiting the cities each year is probably the best indicator
Uh no it's not. Japan has one of the tightest restrictions in foreign visitors to its country in the world. It doesnt indicate anything other then that its very hard to travel to japan and to live there (japan is 99% japanese should be obvious japan is strict).

Quote:
okay, im out. i wanted to show that nyc was hugely influential to a lot of major cities and i think ive done that if you read the links i posted.
How does it? Tokyo urban planning is completely different than NYC. Even all the city designers and architects on the most respected urban webste (skyscrapercity) say that tokyo and NYC are completely different. Tell me how NYC has influenced Tokyo? You say because of the neon lights, even though france invented them, and all it is advertising on buildings. Any company in a dense city can do that. What other ways has NYC influenced tokyo? In city planning? They are planned completely different. Actually right now japanese cities are models for chinese cities, not NYC. Japanese cities are the most efficient and have the best rapid transit in the world.

Last edited by Bibi12; 05-26-2009 at 02:26 PM..
 
Old 05-26-2009, 02:25 PM
 
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Tokyo is hundreds of years older than NYC is. In other words most of tokyo has existed before NYC even existed, many of tokyo roads and districts remain unchanged.

Quote:
During the subsequent Edo period, Edo grew into one of the largest cities in the world with a population topping one million by the 1700s
So no NYC hasnt influenced tokyo alot, most of tokyo has existed for a long long time.

Quote:
Central Tokyo, like Osaka, has been designed since about the turn of the century (1900) to be centered around major train stations in a high-density fashion, so suburban railways were built relatively cheaply at street level and with their own right-of-way. Though expressways have been built in Tokyo, the basic design has not changed.
 
Old 05-26-2009, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Back home in Kaguawagpjpa.
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^^^^ True, Tokyo is older than NYC.

Though, Tokyo has been built over at least twice.

Example: Tokyo suffered from the Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923. Also, Tokyo was bombed heavily during WWII.

NYC hasn't suffered from neither a massive earthquake nor from a war.

This is why NYC's infrastucture is so much older than Tokyo's; IE, the subway system, bridges, tunnels, etc.
 
Old 05-26-2009, 02:36 PM
 
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Yes buildings were rebuilt but that doesnt change anything. The planning of tokyo has remained basically unchanged since the year 1900. That means even though a commercial district was obliterated in ww2, it was rebuilt in the same fasion with a rail line in the exact same place. The design/planning of tokyo is essentially the same as 1900. Commercial/industrial/residential areas as well as subway,light rail etc are the same. Mass transit, and shinkasen are newer though (and has nothing to do with NYC since they are japanese inventions).

50% of tokyo was bombed during the ww2 air raids, but 50% doesnt translate over to 100%. Japanese infrastructure is so good because the japanese government puts a large amount of money towards it. Japan probably spends the most per capita on infrastructure than any other country, and japan is the leading innovator when it comes to mass transit technology such as shinkasen and new rail models etc.
 
Old 05-26-2009, 02:43 PM
 
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AFAIK NYC only has the subway and no light rail or above ground rail correct? If im wrong then please correct me. This is what tokyo has.

Quote:
Tokyo, as the center of the Greater Tokyo Area, is Japan's largest domestic and international hub for rail, ground, and air transportation. Public transportation within Tokyo is dominated by an extensive network of clean and efficient[32] trains and subways run by a variety of operators, with buses, monorails and trams playing a secondary feeder role.

Rail is the primary mode of transportation in Tokyo, which has the most extensive urban railway network in the world and an equally extensive network of surface lines.


Shinkasen at tokyo station.

Quote:
The Shinkansen (新幹線) is a network of high-speed railway lines in Japan operated by four Japan Railways Group companies. Starting with the 210 km/h (130 mph) Tōkaidō Shinkansen in 1964, the now 2,459 km (1,528 mi) long network has expanded to link most major cities on the islands of Honshū and Kyūshū at speeds up to 300 km/h (186 mph). Test runs have reached 443 km/h (275 mph) for conventional rail in 1996, and up to a world-record 581 km/h (361 mph) for maglev trainsets in 2003.

The Tōkaidō Shinkansen is the world's busiest high-speed rail line. Carrying 375,000 passengers a day, it has transported more passengers (4.5 billion) than all other high speed lines in the world combined. Though largely a long-distance transport system, the Shinkansen also serves commuters who travel to work in metropolitan areas from outlying cities.
 
Old 05-26-2009, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Back home in Kaguawagpjpa.
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^^^ But the buildings wen't build in the same style and architectural features, and technology then pre-WWII. A lot of civilians buildings in Tokyo were made out of wood, part of the reason why there were so many civilian deaths during the air raids. Yes, one can rebuilt train lines and buildings, but it wouldn't be made of the same exact style and materials prior to its destruction.

Just as you stated, Japan spends a lot of money on infrastructure. 50% bombed may not mean 100%, but it does mean that 50% of the city will be remade into a new modern metropolis.
 
Old 05-26-2009, 02:49 PM
 
895 posts, read 2,146,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SilkCity0416 View Post
^^^ But the buildings wen't build in the same style and architectural features, and technology then pre-WWII. A lot of civilians buildings in Tokyo were made out of wood, part of the reason why there were so many civilian deaths during the air raids. Yes, one can rebuilt train lines and buildings, but it wouldn't be made of the same exact style and materials prior to its destruction.

Just as you stated, Japan spends a lot of money on infrastructure. 50% bombed may not mean 100%, but it does mean that 50% of the city will be remade into a new modern metropolis.
Most of japanese houses are still built with wood identical to the 1900s actually. This is why i said a + for NYC. But one of the reasons for this is earth quake resistance, and limited space and cheap materials. The only major difference is of course the commercial areas where skyscrapers sprung up. Nothing really changed in the commercial districts from 1940 to 1950, its mostly in the 60s-early 90s that they sprang up. Of course they demolished what was there already and built taller buildings. Most of japanese trains and rail systems get major renovations every 10-15 years or so, so once again it doesnt have to do with ww2 bombing.

Are you saying NYC metro is the same as from ww2? And if what youre saying is Tokyo is "newer" because of the bombings, than shouldnt all of japans trains and mass transit be from 1950? Most are from the 90s and 2000s since we are always renovating and making new technologies.

Things are constantly being rebuilt even in NYC companies demolish buildings and make newer ones (bofa tower for example), same for tokyo, but tokyo's planning is essentialy identical since 1900s and is very different than NYC's planning.
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