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Old 05-26-2009, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Back home in Kaguawagpjpa.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NihonKitty View Post
AFAIK NYC only has the subway and no light rail or above ground rail correct?



NYC has a subway system ( New York City Subway) trains that connect to New Jersey ( PATH ) and train lines that connect to Long Island and Upstate NY ( MTA LIRR and MTA Metro North ). There are also interstate train lines that are based out of Penn Station.

 
Old 05-26-2009, 02:54 PM
 
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So in NY you have rail above ground?? I didnt see that when i went there (actually i remember some kind but it looked like light rail not rapid transit)..

http://blog.core10.co.uk/img/japan_2007/275_flyover_through_building_osaka.JPG (broken link)

Here is a picture of japans above rail system (yes the train tracks are going through the building).
 
Old 05-26-2009, 03:10 PM
 
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Here is an interesting timelapse/skyline video of tokyo the biggest and most efficient metropolis in the world

Tokyo has a decent skyline but without a doubt manhatten wins, the problem is tokyo has even more buildings than NYC but its all spread out so you just see random tall skyscrapers, though shinjuku does have somewhat of a "skyline". Tokyo skyline would be much more impressive if all the buildings were put together.

BTW tokyo is constructing the "tokyo skytree" which will be 2003 feet tall, taller than NYC future tallest the "freedom tower". But even with the skytree tokyos skyline will still lose since its spread out (but tokyo is much more dense than NYC but most buildings are low to mid highrises which does make it look impressive).







^ this pic is from the imperial palace.

Last edited by Bibi12; 05-26-2009 at 03:19 PM..
 
Old 05-26-2009, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Back home in Kaguawagpjpa.
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Some subway lines itself travels above group.

Mostly due to topragraphy. IE, in Upper Manhattan, it is very hilly and at the time the subway was being built, it was very hard to blast the bedrock in this area. So, the subway was extented for above ground use.


In many areas of the city, there are above ground subway service.
 
Old 05-26-2009, 03:23 PM
 
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If it goes above the ground i dont think its called subway anymore. Unless you mean its an extention of the subway system. In japan theres a subway and above ground rail network that are not connected (they share some stations though so you can change).
 
Old 05-26-2009, 03:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NihonKitty View Post
AFAIK NYC only has the subway and no light rail or above ground rail correct? If im wrong then please correct me. This is what tokyo has.




This is what NYC has.

Quote:
The transportation system of New York City is a cooperation of complex systems of infrastructure. New York City, being the largest city in the United States, has a transportation system which includes the largest subway system in the world, measured by track mileage; the world's first mechanically ventilated vehicular tunnel, and an aerial tramway. Through prolonged use, and a distinct history of events, the infrastructure now faces increasing problems in functionality, dependability, and funding.

NYC Subway
Quote:
The New York City Subway is a rapid transit system owned by the City of New York and leased to the New York City Transit Authority,[3] a subsidiary agency of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and also known as MTA New York City Transit. It is one of the oldest and most extensive public transportation systems in the world, with 468 stations in operation (422 if stations connected by transfers are counted as a single station);[1] 229 miles (369 km) of routes,[4] translating into 656 miles (1,056 km) of revenue track; and a total of 842 miles (1,355 km) including non-revenue trackage.[5] In 2007, the subway delivered over 1.562 billion rides, averaging over five million on weekdays, 2.9 million on Saturdays, and 2.2 million on Sundays.[1]
The New York City Subway trails only the metro systems of Tokyo, Moscow and Seoul in annual ridership and carries more passengers than all other rail mass transit systems in the United States combined. Among the world's busiest metro systems it is the only one to run 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.






Long Island Rail Road
Quote:
The Long Island Rail Road (reporting mark LI) or LIRR is a commuter rail system serving the length of Long Island, New York that has been classified as a Class II railroad by the Surface Transportation Board.[1] It is the busiest commuter railroad in North America, servicing around 81 million passengers each year, and the oldest US railroad still operating under its original name and charter. There are 124 stations on the LIRR, and more than 700 miles (1,100 km) of track[2] on its two lines to the two forks of the island and eight major branches. Each weekday, the LIRR provides more than 280,000 rides to customers.[3] It is publicly owned by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which has styled it MTA Long Island Rail Road.
In addition to commuter trains, the LIRR runs trains for travelers to eastern Long Island, including the express Cannonball to the Hamptons, operated since the 1890s.
Freight service on the system has been operated by the New York and Atlantic Railway since 1997, including four freight-only branches and Bay Ridge Yard in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn.
On May 17, 2007, Long Island Rail Road was awarded a Bronze E. H. Harriman Award for its safety record in 2006.[4]
The current LIRR logo combines the circular MTA logo with the text "Long Island Rail Road", and appears on the sides of trains.




Metro North





NJ Transit






PATH



Last edited by Cornerguy1; 05-26-2009 at 07:51 PM.. Reason: copyrighted material removed
 
Old 05-26-2009, 03:25 PM
 
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^ thanks for the info
Quote:
The New York City Subway trails only the metro systems of Tokyo, Moscow and Seoul in annual ridership and carries more passengers than all other rail mass transit systems in the United States combined. Among the world's busiest metro systems it is the only one to run 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.
Hmm moscow has a heavily used subway system?? I didnt know that lol..

BTW isnt the mass transit in washington DC supposed to be the "best" (technologically advanced) in the US?
 
Old 05-26-2009, 03:32 PM
 
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And each one is connected to japanese cities here is map of japan rail system



^ this pic is the shinkasen network though there are others as well. I admit im kind of a train-enthusiast!

Last edited by Cornerguy1; 05-26-2009 at 07:52 PM.. Reason: copyrighted material removed
 
Old 05-26-2009, 03:39 PM
 
1,107 posts, read 2,685,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NihonKitty View Post


Here is an interesting timelapse/skyline video of tokyo the biggest and most efficient metropolis in the world

Tokyo has a decent skyline but without a doubt manhatten wins, the problem is tokyo has even more buildings than NYC but its all spread out so you just see random tall skyscrapers, though shinjuku does have somewhat of a "skyline". Tokyo skyline would be much more impressive if all the buildings were put together.

BTW tokyo is constructing the "tokyo skytree" which will be 2003 feet tall, taller than NYC future tallest the "freedom tower". But even with the skytree tokyos skyline will still lose since its spread out (but tokyo is much more dense than NYC but most buildings are low to mid highrises which does make it look impressive).







^ this pic is from the imperial palace.
About density. You cant compare NYC to the entire city of Tokyo but mainly the 23 special wards. Which NYC is more dense in this case. If you compare the Metropolitan areas it would be uneven even though Tokyo would win in this favor but NYC has twice the amount of Land with 1/4 the density of tokyo so how can we compare metro densities. About the buildings tokyo doesnt have as many highrise buildings as NY if you start at 13 stories.
 
Old 05-26-2009, 03:45 PM
 
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^^ i didnt mean population density i ment dense as in the buildings are all very close to eachother. Most of the "suburbs" of tokyo commute to tokyo. Theres like basically no space in tokyo anywhere even for a park. Thats why housing is ridiculously expensive in tokyo, much more than NYC afaik. And i'm aware that NYC has more skyscrapers.
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