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Old 10-21-2011, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Filipinas
1,868 posts, read 6,770,390 times
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I am just wondering how it sounds like to other people?

Here are example clips:

This is a clip from a Movie "Anak" (Child)






Music - Pangako sa'yo (The Promise)

Last edited by pinai; 10-21-2011 at 10:41 PM..
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Old 10-22-2011, 12:34 AM
 
Location: Filipinas
1,868 posts, read 6,770,390 times
Reputation: 395
Here is example of 7 Different Asian Languages

Songs


After listening to some Asian music..
their languages sounds really sweet too

because i don't know if our language has a high pitch like other languages or if it's too nasal

Last edited by pinai; 10-22-2011 at 01:03 AM..
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Old 10-22-2011, 06:02 AM
 
Location: Spain
195 posts, read 583,314 times
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sounds more pleasant than other asian languages to me
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Old 10-22-2011, 08:17 AM
 
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Although not Asian myself, I've lived and worked amongst Asians and Filipinos for 30 years. IMHO, possibly because it's infused with English and Spanish, Tagalog seems to lack the fluid syncopation one hears in the romantic languages. The English and Spanish infusions make it sound non continuous to non native ears. Tagalog is a language where you can place words such as pulis (police) and libro (book) in the same sentence. To my ears, that tends to arrest a bit of fluidity.

My favourite Asian language is Nihongo; i.e., the Japanese language.

That being stated, regardless of how Tagalog sounds, never in my life have I met a more polite and hospitable people who will go out of their way to ensure you feel welcomed when visiting their homes. For that I am eternally greatful.
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Old 10-22-2011, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Leeds, UK
22,198 posts, read 22,375,211 times
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A bit weird..
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Old 10-22-2011, 05:01 PM
 
3,645 posts, read 8,645,622 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chacho_keva View Post
Although not Asian myself, I've lived and worked amongst Asians and Filipinos for 30 years. IMHO, possibly because it's infused with English and Spanish, Tagalog seems to lack the fluid syncopation one hears in the romantic languages. The English and Spanish infusions make it sound non continuous to non native ears. Tagalog is a language where you can place words such as pulis (police) and libro (book) in the same sentence. To my ears, that tends to arrest a bit of fluidity.

My favourite Asian language is Nihongo; i.e., the Japanese language.

That being stated, regardless of how Tagalog sounds, never in my life have I met a more polite and hospitable people who will go out of their way to ensure you feel welcomed when visiting their homes. For that I am eternally greatful.
I agree that the English loanwords make it sounds non-continuous. I hate hearing English in Tagalog. However, I think the Spanish loanwords sound natural within Tagalog. Also, I think Tagalog sounds a lot more fluid than other Asian languages like Vietnamese. It's very choppy because it's monosyllabic. Tagalog sounds very fluid in comparison.

Japanese isn't monosyllabic, but it sounds very monotone to me, which makes it not as pleasant IMO
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Old 10-22-2011, 08:56 PM
 
Location: Duluth, Minnesota, USA
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Like birds squawking.
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Old 10-23-2011, 12:34 AM
 
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I think this is a good example of Tagalog with a lot of Spanish loanwords. It seems like every few words is a Spanish word, or derived from Spanish.


Schoolkid in trouble? Use a whistle - YouTube
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Old 10-23-2011, 03:06 AM
 
2,227 posts, read 4,284,438 times
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I understood the general meaning...La Police is giving away Pitos to la Clase for a better Seguridad..
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Old 10-23-2011, 03:53 AM
 
Location: Fayetteville, NC
1,490 posts, read 5,048,849 times
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When my wife and her girl friends get together for "chismis" it sounds like white noise.

After 22 years of marriage I can tune it out.

But, I can always tell when they start talking about me.












Just kidding. After living with Filipinos for so long I can usually understand the subject of the conversation.
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