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Old 05-10-2012, 06:27 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,352,353 times
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In the developed world, Japan must stick out as being the least diverse/most homogeneous country (with Scandinavia not too far behind). I'm not saying this is a bad thing: diversity doesn't necessarily make a country better or worse, it just how it is. But given the aging population and Japan's population decline, do you think they will begin to take in more and more non-Japanese to bolster the workforce? I mean I know 94 million is still a large population, but it will be a lot older by then, and they might want more people to support the populace.

I imagine Westerners as much as other Asians might be incorporated...Many Westerners already work there, and a select few probably plan to settle there, if they can. While I'm not sure how hard it is to get a permanent residence visa there, if possible at all, I wonder if the Japanese will ever change it's attitude?

I doubt it will ever become a 'melting' pot like the US or even France, of course, nor am I saying it should. But do you see other nations - say Americans, Koreans, Chinese, Indians - migrating to Japanese in significant numbers and perhaps even forming a permanent, minority American Japanese? Like white European or American Japanese people born in Japan who are raised Japanese, speak the language.etc in the same way there are Japanese Americans?

Last edited by Trimac20; 05-10-2012 at 06:44 AM..
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Old 05-10-2012, 06:40 AM
 
Location: Kowaniec, Nowy Targ, Podhale. 666 m n.p.m.
371 posts, read 841,130 times
Reputation: 475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
In the developed world, Japan must stick out as being the least diverse/most homogeneous country (with Scandinavia not too far behind). I'm not saying this is a bad thing: diversity doesn't necessarily make a country better or worse, it just how it is. But given the aging population and Japan's population decline, do you think they will begin to take in more and more non-Japanese to bolster the workforce? I mean I know 94 million is still a large population, but it will be a lot older by then, and they might want more people to support the populace.

I imagine Westerners as much as other Asians might be incorporated...Many Westerners already work there, and a select few probably plan to settle there, if they can. While I'm not sure how hard it is to get a permanent residence visa there, if possible at all, I wonder if the Japanese will ever change it's attitude?

I doubt it will ever become a 'melting' pot like the US or even France, of course, nor am I saying it should. But do you see other nations - say Americans, Koreans, Chinese, Indians - migrating to Japanese in significant numbers and perhaps even forming a permanent, minority Japanese Americans? While there were say white European or American Japanese people born in Japan who are raised Japanese, speak the language.etc in the same way there are Japanese Americans?
Saying that Scandinavia is not far behind Japan in terms of having an homogenous society proves that you've never been to the likes of Malmo, Copenhagen or Stockholm. I'd say Poland is probably second after Japan as non-Europeans make up about 0.4% of the population here, and even in my city, Kraków, which is the most ethnically diverse city in the country, non-western immigrants make up only about 1.5% of the population. Unlike Japan, Poland is very accepting of other cultures and immigrants, we just don't get as much of it, as blue-collar jobs here are not that attractive for immigrants compared to Germany or Scandinavia. Hell, even until 2008 we were exporting more skilled labour than we had people moving here...

As for Japan, unless they want to replace their entire workforce with robots, they will *have* to become more accepting of immigrants if they want their society to survive. Either that, or they will need policies that force Japanese women to produce more Japanese children, something like the opposite from the Chinese one-child policy...
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Old 05-10-2012, 07:49 AM
 
212 posts, read 335,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
While I'm not sure how hard it is to get a permanent residence visa there, if possible at all, I wonder if the Japanese will ever change it's attitude?
I thought it was easier to get working visa in Japan than in the US, permanent residence visa as well.

According to this page, only 279 applicants for Japanese citizenship out of 11008 were rejected last year.

How hard is it to get citizenship in the US?
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Old 05-10-2012, 08:29 AM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,157,510 times
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Japan does not need more immigrants. The sky is not going to fall because Japan doesn't accept a lot of immigrants. Let's face reality here, for all those who think unlimited immigration is a good thing. Japan is a country that lacks natural resources, and there is a SERIOUS lack of space in Japan. Even more so now that a good chunk of northern Honshu is uninhabitable thanks to nuclear fallout. Japan does not need more people. If anything, it needs less, and the natural population decline is a very good thing for Japan. It will ensure that the Japanese people have higher incomes (basic supply and demand), and thus, a higher standard of living for the Japanese.
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Old 05-10-2012, 04:05 PM
 
218 posts, read 444,838 times
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There are more people in the Tokyo Metro area than there are in Canada.
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Old 05-10-2012, 04:42 PM
 
Location: God's Gift to Mankind for flying anything
5,326 posts, read 11,041,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imokay View Post
There are more people in the Tokyo Metro area than there are in Canada.
That means what ... ?
In Tokyo, everybody is on top of each other, or there are hardly any people in Canada ???

I heard another similar *huh ... ?* thing about the *fact* that you could put all the people in the USA in Texas and still not feel crowded ...

Is it true that there are more Italians in NYC then there are in Italy ?

Back to Japanese being *overrun* by immigrants, in the future maybe ...
I doubt that they will ever have the similar situation the USA is trying to deal with, where so many come in *illegally* or *overstay* their welcome.

Really, Japan is an big island, where you just cannot walk across a border to get in , or ?

Last edited by irman; 05-10-2012 at 05:04 PM..
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Old 05-10-2012, 05:01 PM
 
Location: God's Gift to Mankind for flying anything
5,326 posts, read 11,041,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ryuji View Post
I thought it was easier to get working visa in Japan than in the US, permanent residence visa as well.

You think ? Is it really *easy* to get a permanent visa in Japan ?

According to this page, only 279 applicants for Japanese citizenship out of 11008 were rejected last year.

Does the article state what the reasons were for the immigration process ?
What could have been the reasons for the denial of the visa ?


How hard is it to get citizenship in the US?
To get in the USA legally and to stay for ever, it is not easy at all.
If you have a parent already there, you may get a *break*.
If you have a child already there, you may get a *break*.
If you have a *talent* that is outstanding, and nobody already there can fill that vacant job, you may get a *break*.
(see below)
So yes, to do it legally *NOT easy !!!*

I was extremely lucky that I was proficient in a certain field that was required in the early 60's. So I was invited to come to the USA, because of the on-going Space Programme then, as were so many other Europeans with Aerospace knowledge. When I became a citizen, I sponsored my siblings to come here. Our parents decided that the social structure in Europe was better for them so they only visited each year for three months.

Will this (bringing their siblings or parents to Japan) happen with some *westerners* already living and working in Japan ? No idea. Right now, what would be a very good reason to even wish to live and work in Japan ? Really, you just can not just go there and hope for the best, no ?

I needed a co-worker, who would be fluent, I mean really fluent, in French and German, because we were expanding into the European Market. I found a guy who was French, and had all the qualifications I thought we needed. He was in the USA on a Student Visa.
Geesj, you should have seen all those *hoops* we had to jump through to get him a permanent green card !! Ads in the news papers to find a *local*. Providing sponsorship guarantees for him to work with us, etc, etc. The worst thing, for me at least, was working with the guy in the government, to get the permanent visa. He was Korean, with a terrible accent in English, whom I hardly could understand !!! On top of that , if you would be able to see who signed my citizenship certificate, you would snicker for at least 20 minutes. The signature reads: Y. Tong !!!
I would have been more proud if it was signed by a guy named *Running Bear* or something akin ....

Last edited by irman; 05-10-2012 at 05:15 PM..
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Old 05-10-2012, 05:22 PM
 
8,648 posts, read 15,292,423 times
Reputation: 4570
NO they wont and they are smart not to.....
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Old 05-10-2012, 05:32 PM
 
8,648 posts, read 15,292,423 times
Reputation: 4570
Quote:
Originally Posted by irman View Post
To get in the USA legally and to stay for ever, it is not easy at all.
If you have a parent already there, you may get a *break*.
If you have a child already there, you may get a *break*.
If you have a *talent* that is outstanding, and nobody already there can fill that vacant job, you may get a *break*.
(see below)
So yes, to do it legally *NOT easy !!!*

I was extremely lucky that I was proficient in a certain field that was required in the early 60's. So I was invited to come to the USA, because of the on-going Space Programme then, as were so many other Europeans with Aerospace knowledge. When I became a citizen, I sponsored my siblings to come here. Our parents decided that the social structure in Europe was better for them so they only visited each year for three months.

Will this (bringing their siblings or parents to Japan) happen with some *westerners* already living and working in Japan ? No idea. Right now, what would be a very good reason to even wish to live and work in Japan ? Really, you just can not just go there and hope for the best, no ?

I needed a co-worker, who would be fluent, I mean really fluent, in French and German, because we were expanding into the European Market. I found a guy who was French, and had all the qualifications I thought we needed. He was in the USA on a Student Visa.
Geesj, you should have seen all those *hoops* we had to jump through to get him a permanent green card !! Ads in the news papers to find a *local*. Providing sponsorship guarantees for him to work with us, etc, etc. The worst thing, for me at least, was working with the guy in the government, to get the permanent visa. He was Korean, with a terrible accent in English, whom I hardly could understand !!! On top of that , if you would be able to see who signed my citizenship certificate, you would snicker for at least 20 minutes. The signature reads: Y. Tong !!!
I would have been more proud if it was signed by a guy named *Running Bear* or something akin ....

South Koreans start taking english in grade school and probably speak better english then you write english....
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Old 05-10-2012, 06:08 PM
 
190 posts, read 527,918 times
Reputation: 219
Agree with theunbrainwashed. I think most in Japan are not worried about a declining population due to the overcrowding there. There are other ways to keep a high standard of living besides taking in a ton of immigrants for cheap labor and to increase the population.
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