U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-07-2013, 09:33 PM
 
6,722 posts, read 6,599,126 times
Reputation: 2386

Advertisements

Japanese sounds like Hawaiian. The syllables are very simple and smooth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-07-2013, 11:53 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,352,353 times
Reputation: 11862
I've always thought Japanese had similarities to Maori. Taranaki, NZ, could easily be a Japanese word, as could Kaikoura. Wakkanai in Japan could be Maori. There was a theory that purported a connection between Japanese ans Polynesian culture which I find quite plausible.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2013, 12:42 AM
 
6,722 posts, read 6,599,126 times
Reputation: 2386
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I've always thought Japanese had similarities to Maori. Taranaki, NZ, could easily be a Japanese word, as could Kaikoura. Wakkanai in Japan could be Maori. There was a theory that purported a connection between Japanese ans Polynesian culture which I find quite plausible.
Yes some people proposed that Japan was occupied by Austronesian people first. Then some people from East Asia came in and changed their pattern.

Taiwan was dominated by Austronesians before Chinese moved there anyway. There could have been some Negritos too.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-08-2013, 01:08 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,352,353 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bettafish View Post
Yes some people proposed that Japan was occupied by Austronesian people first. Then some people from East Asia came in and changed their pattern.

Taiwan was dominated by Austronesians before Chinese moved there anyway. There could have been some Negritos too.
The Jomon civilisation, probably related to Ainu civilisation, seem to exhibit northern australoid or proto mongoloid type peoples. Yes its believed negritos inhabited both Taiwan and Sri Lanka before Indians and Austronesians took over.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-05-2013, 08:44 AM
 
2,241 posts, read 2,672,622 times
Reputation: 424
Tagalog and Spanish based Creole called Chavacano spoken in the Phillipines have a lot of Spanish influences, along with some Portuguese
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-05-2013, 09:03 AM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,157,510 times
Reputation: 11619
To me, Japanese sounds like if Spanish was an Asian language. Both languages have a very flat tone to them when spoken, robotic if you must. Japanese syllables are similar to Spanish, except Japanese is more "spaced out" whereas Spanish rams syllables together (prueba as opposed to the Japanese structure pureba). I'm not counting creole-like concoctions in my post.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-05-2013, 09:14 AM
 
Location: San Francisco, California
1,953 posts, read 5,202,766 times
Reputation: 2294
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I agree, actually. Both Japanese and Italian sound kind of 'technical', while Mandarin and French actually sound quite poetic and lilting.

Vietnamese and Spanish sound, no offense, kinda 'trashy' and include a lot of shouting.

German maybe sounds very vaguely like Arab?
in the movie True Lies Arnold Schwarzenegger speaks in Arabic in a scene with the terrorists

and his Austrian accent seems to work well for Arabic
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-05-2013, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,846,437 times
Reputation: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by other99 View Post
Filipino language as there are many words derived from Spanish.
6,000 Spanish words
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-05-2013, 08:14 PM
 
25,059 posts, read 23,157,510 times
Reputation: 11619
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
6,000 Spanish words
Even with so many words, Filipino languages still sound foreign on my tongue.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-05-2013, 10:18 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 8,997,592 times
Reputation: 1798
There's so much Spanish and English in a typical Filipino news report that someone who knows English and Spanish may be able to understand a lot just by putting all the words they know together. It's not like that with any other Asian language.

Not every news report is like this, but every other word is Spanish or English


Bus terminals filling up amid long weekend - YouTube

But :27-:45 they'd probably have no clue what is being said, but if she used Spanish numerals instead of Tagalog, it might have been clear what she was saying

Last edited by Smtchll; 11-05-2013 at 10:29 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top