U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-10-2012, 08:06 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,403,340 times
Reputation: 11862

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by JL View Post
Not really. They consider the older generation that settled abroad as Vietnamese(right after 1975), but they consider the second generation Vietnamese as Americans. My niece traveled with my sister and the local Vietnamese asked her if she spoke any Vietnamese. Even my relatives in Vietnam pretty much have accepted this. The Vietnamese that can send their kids abroad to study in the States are doing so in hopes of them eventually getting residency. Some have married and had kids, so they are aware of this.
Good to know they're accepting. It's just that in some Asian countries they make a big deal about 'blood' and 'ancestry', like Korea, Japan.etc. Even if you've lived in Japan for generations, if you're of non-Japanese ancestry you'll always be a foreigner.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-16-2012, 11:20 PM
 
Location: Paramus, NJ
500 posts, read 1,256,114 times
Reputation: 207
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Europeans, in general, treat me more as an Australian than an Asian, and a lot of Asians do too, it's just I still get that attitude from a segment of the population.
Probably depends on which European country you go to, too. ^_^

(I conclude my situation with the Holland teenagers is just a lucky guess thing, since they were just passing by....)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2012, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Hyrule
8,398 posts, read 9,892,998 times
Reputation: 7441
As an American/Korean I get this when I'm in Korea visiting family. I'm a banana, Korean on the outside but white on the inside. I actually know the Korean language and it doesn't matter, they can sniff me out like dogs. lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-17-2012, 07:54 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,403,340 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by PoppySead View Post
As an American/Korean I get this when I'm in Korea visiting family. I'm a banana, Korean on the outside but white on the inside. I actually know the Korean language and it doesn't matter, they can sniff me out like dogs. lol
Of course, any Korean you couldn't recognise your Korean accent must be deaf.

Even with my Australian accent some (a minority I guess) Thais, Chinese etc can't seem to accept that I'm Australian.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2012, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Hyrule
8,398 posts, read 9,892,998 times
Reputation: 7441
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Of course, any Korean you couldn't recognise your Korean accent must be deaf.

Even with my Australian accent some (a minority I guess) Thais, Chinese etc can't seem to accept that I'm Australian.
So funny you say that because I watched a movie about an Asian from Australia with that same problem. It must be popular enough to do a show about. lol

It's hard in the middle of nowhere. You aren't really an Aussy and you aren't really culturally an Asian. You are in between to most people. I have this same issue.
In America the first thing people see is Asian, in Korea the first thing people see is a lost American Asian who needs to come back home where they belong. What can one do? I've never fixed this.
ha ha ha ha
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2012, 08:27 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,403,340 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by PoppySead View Post
So funny you say that because I watched a movie about an Asian from Australia with that same problem. It must be popular enough to do a show about. lol

It's hard in the middle of nowhere. You aren't really an Aussy and you aren't really culturally an Asian. You are in between to most people. I have this same issue.
In America the first thing people see is Asian, in Korea the first thing people see is a lost American Asian who needs to come back home where they belong. What can one do? I've never fixed this.
ha ha ha ha
Actually I don't like it when people say I'm 'not really' an Australian. I came here when I was in nappies, I don't know what it's like living anywhere else. I'm a citizen of Australia (had to denounce my Singaporean citizenship) so of course I'm an Australian first. Our prime minister came here at age 6 yet nobody questions her Australianness because she's from Wales, it annoys me... Apart from eating maybe slightly more Asian food than the average Euro Australian (of course I ate plenty of Western food at home as well as out) I'm Australian. It's not because I'm ashamed of my Asian heritage; in fact sometimes I wish I actually had more culturally connection to it, but I can't pretend to be anything other than a cultural Westerner I'm afraid. I can't speak any other language, and well yeah...it might be different for you, though, since I assume your parents spoke Korean at home? I know some people I know with parents from Hong Kong like that. My parents actually grew up speaking English (schooled in English too), they're from Singapore and Malaysia, and are pretty westernized as a result.

But yes, there are still a minority who might still see me as 'Asian first', but I think that attitude is becoming rarer as Australia's becoming more multicultural. I guess some Asians in Asia just can't seem to understand that not all Aussies are white.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-21-2012, 02:05 PM
 
Location: American Expat
2,189 posts, read 4,717,030 times
Reputation: 1876
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Actually I don't like it when people say I'm 'not really' an Australian. I came here when I was in nappies, I don't know what it's like living anywhere else. I'm a citizen of Australia (had to denounce my Singaporean citizenship) so of course I'm an Australian first. Our prime minister came here at age 6 yet nobody questions her Australianness because she's from Wales, it annoys me... Apart from eating maybe slightly more Asian food than the average Euro Australian (of course I ate plenty of Western food at home as well as out) I'm Australian. It's not because I'm ashamed of my Asian heritage; in fact sometimes I wish I actually had more culturally connection to it, but I can't pretend to be anything other than a cultural Westerner I'm afraid. I can't speak any other language, and well yeah...it might be different for you, though, since I assume your parents spoke Korean at home? I know some people I know with parents from Hong Kong like that. My parents actually grew up speaking English (schooled in English too), they're from Singapore and Malaysia, and are pretty westernized as a result.

But yes, there are still a minority who might still see me as 'Asian first', but I think that attitude is becoming rarer as Australia's becoming more multicultural. I guess some Asians in Asia just can't seem to understand that not all Aussies are white.
You must have seen that one video with the 2 white guys speaking Chinese. cause they were born and raised in Hong Kong. You wouldn't call them Chinese, would you ?
I'm not saying you're wrongly complaining about this - I'm just saying.

The German Vice President was born in Vietnam. I think he only lived there for a couple of months. He was in Vietnam on an official trip just this week. I read a couple of interviews he gave there, and it was always "He's one of us", "Our" etc. He constantly had to fend off questions/doubts. He, literally, must have said at least 10 times that he's German, his home is Germany etc. Some quite embarrassing questions they asked.
But, it's a poor/developing country. People are very traditional, and everything else that comes with that. Besides, how many people will call themselves, for instance, American? Mostly, it's just Vietnamese, Chinese etc. So it's not just those who live there, but also those who have been living abroad for a long time. Even several generations. I'd just ignore it if it bothers you. It's not really a major problem.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-24-2012, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,779 posts, read 13,361,441 times
Reputation: 11309
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glucorious View Post
You must have seen that one video with the 2 white guys speaking Chinese. cause they were born and raised in Hong Kong. You wouldn't call them Chinese, would you ?
I'm not saying you're wrongly complaining about this - I'm just saying.
I'd consider them to be Hong Kongers. I mean, they were born there, raised there, and speak Chinese. They certainly wouldn't be English or German or French or whatever else their parents' nationality was.

A few years back, I was working at a hotel in Santa Monica and we had a Japanese tour group come in. I had just finished Japanese 2 and the hotel had started selling to Japanese tour companies telling them that they had staff who spoke Japanese because of me, and a Japanese-Brazilian cook. One of the guys on the tour was white, blonde-haired and blue-eyed, and with his Japanese girlfriend. I figured he was an expatriate of some European country, but no... he was born and raised in Japan. He explained that his grandparents were Americans who stayed in Okinawa after WW2 and opened a business, and on the other side, his family were missionaries from the Netherlands. I guess that the common language between the parents was Japanese; he spoke only a tiny bit more English than the other people on tour, had the same mannerisms as a Japanese guy would...

Coming from a country that's not homogeneous, and more specifically having spent my entire teens and adult life in diverse, major coastal metropolises, it's not hard to imagine someone of a different ethnic extraction growing up in another country and being of that nationality. If I move to Japan with a non-Japanese woman and we have a kid there, even if they grow up speaking English and being over six feet tall and blonde and blue-eyed like me, they'll still have grown up in Japan, going to Japanese schools, watching Japanese TV, eating Japanese food, having Japanese friends and romantic interests, using Japanese cultural norms... same if they were to grow up in China or Hong Kong. People in that country may look at them and immediately think they are a foreigner and that will give them a drastically different experience from other people from that nation, but that won't make them any more American than they would have been!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-24-2012, 08:44 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,403,340 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glucorious View Post
You must have seen that one video with the 2 white guys speaking Chinese. cause they were born and raised in Hong Kong. You wouldn't call them Chinese, would you ?
I'm not saying you're wrongly complaining about this - I'm just saying.

The German Vice President was born in Vietnam. I think he only lived there for a couple of months. He was in Vietnam on an official trip just this week. I read a couple of interviews he gave there, and it was always "He's one of us", "Our" etc. He constantly had to fend off questions/doubts. He, literally, must have said at least 10 times that he's German, his home is Germany etc. Some quite embarrassing questions they asked.
But, it's a poor/developing country. People are very traditional, and everything else that comes with that. Besides, how many people will call themselves, for instance, American? Mostly, it's just Vietnamese, Chinese etc. So it's not just those who live there, but also those who have been living abroad for a long time. Even several generations. I'd just ignore it if it bothers you. It's not really a major problem.
Yes, I would call them Chinese. Of course they're not 'all' Chinese in a sense, they still have American ancestry, but culturally and in nationality they are Chinese. As Chinese as I'm Australian. Of course whether other Chinese call them real Chinese or not is another matter. Ethnic groups are a relative thing anyway.

Yeah that attitude is common in Asia. They speak of the overseas Chinese/Vietnamese/Japanese as if they can never escape that identity even after many generations.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-24-2012, 08:47 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,403,340 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
I'd consider them to be Hong Kongers. I mean, they were born there, raised there, and speak Chinese. They certainly wouldn't be English or German or French or whatever else their parents' nationality was.

A few years back, I was working at a hotel in Santa Monica and we had a Japanese tour group come in. I had just finished Japanese 2 and the hotel had started selling to Japanese tour companies telling them that they had staff who spoke Japanese because of me, and a Japanese-Brazilian cook. One of the guys on the tour was white, blonde-haired and blue-eyed, and with his Japanese girlfriend. I figured he was an expatriate of some European country, but no... he was born and raised in Japan. He explained that his grandparents were Americans who stayed in Okinawa after WW2 and opened a business, and on the other side, his family were missionaries from the Netherlands. I guess that the common language between the parents was Japanese; he spoke only a tiny bit more English than the other people on tour, had the same mannerisms as a Japanese guy would...

Coming from a country that's not homogeneous, and more specifically having spent my entire teens and adult life in diverse, major coastal metropolises, it's not hard to imagine someone of a different ethnic extraction growing up in another country and being of that nationality. If I move to Japan with a non-Japanese woman and we have a kid there, even if they grow up speaking English and being over six feet tall and blonde and blue-eyed like me, they'll still have grown up in Japan, going to Japanese schools, watching Japanese TV, eating Japanese food, having Japanese friends and romantic interests, using Japanese cultural norms... same if they were to grow up in China or Hong Kong. People in that country may look at them and immediately think they are a foreigner and that will give them a drastically different experience from other people from that nation, but that won't make them any more American than they would have been!
I think there are many more Sharon Balcombes than we realise. The thing is, although Hong Kong and to a lesser extent Tokyo are cosmopolitan, the attitudes of the natives is different to us in the US or Australia which are composed almost ENTIRELY of people from elsewhere, although even here there are some ignorant people who question how really Australian an Asian looking person is.

It would be interesting to meet this European-Japanese gentleman. Did he speak English with a Japanese accent?

There are also many 'Eurasians' in Singapore and Hong Kong who are culturally Singaporean/HK (although S'pore is more western). Some speak in a bit more British accent, although many speak just like any other Singaporean, because they ARE Singaporean. The Hong Kong actress Nancy Kwan was half Chinese, half British yet when she went to Hollywood she was typecast as an Asian all the time and generally thought of as a Chinese first. It's as much cultural as it is genetic, if not moreso. In fact HK has many people with some non-Chinese ancestry, Bruce Lee was 1/4 German, for instance, although you couldn't tell from his looks.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top