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Old 06-26-2012, 03:06 AM
 
Location: CA
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I'm interested in the differences in Indian people according to general regions. When I say "differences" I mean pretty much everything, including food, language, traditions, religion, typical appearances, and so on....

So what is your knowledge & what are your observations concerning the differences among Indian people?

Thanks!
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Old 06-27-2012, 02:18 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Yes it does make India so interesting, how there are so many languages with so many speakers (Hindi and Bengali alone boast hundreds of millions of speakers). There are many unifying features as well as many cultural things that make each region distinct and unique.
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Old 06-27-2012, 06:10 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Rather unknown fact: there are two main kinds of classical music in India, Hindustani music and Carnatic music. These are analogous to Western classical music and definitely not what you see in Bollywood movies. Hindistani music is prevalent in Northern India while Carnatic music is popular in the South.
Indian classical music - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 06-27-2012, 06:15 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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As for languages there are more than a thousand, but only 30 of them have more than a million speakers. After independence Indian states were reorganized based on languages, so now most states have their own language, except Hindi which is spoken throughout the Northern and the Western states. Many of these languages are Indo-Aryan whereas the South Indian language are Dravidian. Most languages have their own writing script as well . See here for a list:
Languages of India - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 06-27-2012, 10:16 AM
 
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Some of my co-workers ask me why do two Indians speak in English to one another. My answer to them is, because there is no single language called "Indian". The closest common language is "head wobbling".
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Old 06-29-2012, 04:28 AM
 
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India is a big country with lots of states and also having huge population. Due to the vast region there are many languages, traditions, appearances etc. This dissimilarity unites India, and that's why India is such great country.
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Old 07-16-2012, 02:40 AM
 
Location: CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by affinityconsultant View Post
India is a big country with lots of states and also having huge population. Due to the vast region there are many languages, traditions, appearances etc.
I realize this... I'm asking people to describe these differences, maybe focusing on a few that you're familiar with.
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Old 07-16-2012, 02:47 AM
 
Location: Chicago
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kannadiga View Post
Some of my co-workers ask me why do two Indians speak in English to one another. My answer to them is, because there is no single language called "Indian". The closest common language is "head wobbling".
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Old 07-19-2012, 10:02 PM
 
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Interesting thing is Indians speak English with Indian words in their talking, which make you hard to understand them.
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Old 07-20-2012, 10:49 AM
 
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From an Indian perspective - let me start with a famous "Hindi" saying "Kos-kos par paani badle, char kos par bani" - Water changes its taste at every mile , language at every four mile. This could be an exaggeration if you literally take the numbers nevertheless its very true. Hindi is widely spoken in the northern part of India. The languages are close enough to Hindi to catch the essence of the conversation. But if you go to the southern states, the languages are totally different. So much so that English is use as a communication language between a north and south India.

True that the classical music is more popular but not limited only to the southern part. I would say that the bollywood music started as a variance of classical music in early days but now its more westernized.
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