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Old 12-31-2016, 12:03 AM
 
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Korean still uses Chinese characters on occasion, esp. with names.
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Old 01-02-2017, 08:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlesRamon View Post
Korean still uses Chinese characters on occasion, esp. with names.
Probably only confined to those that are 45+, many youngster cant even recognise their own name in Hanja (Chinese characters) let alone write them.


On many business cards these days in Korea, it's just the Hangul that is printed.


Back on the original topic, being a native English speaker and a poor Chinese speaker, Korean just sounds a lot more rough than Japanese. The latter seems to the untrained Earth, more "flowy"...
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Old 01-02-2017, 11:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willister View Post
Probably only confined to those that are 45+, many youngster cant even recognise their own name in Hanja (Chinese characters) let alone write them.


On many business cards these days in Korea, it's just the Hangul that is printed.


Back on the original topic, being a native English speaker and a poor Chinese speaker, Korean just sounds a lot more rough than Japanese. The latter seems to the untrained Earth, more "flowy"...
The Korean people I personally know can all write their name in Chinese characters. I know it because I like to ask that.
However they are well educated.
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Old 01-03-2017, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Orange County, CA, USA
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In terms of the distinction between spoken Korean and Japanese- there are many, but hard to describe in words. In general, Koreans speak louder than the Japanese. I think Japanese has more vowel endings. As some of the prior posters have indicated, Korean at times have this "spit like sound" and often have interjections or endings that sound liks "simi-da". And say "nay". NOTE: I am not Korean. I am Taiwanese-American. My wife is Korean-American and speaks Korean to her parents.
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Old 01-04-2017, 04:53 PM
 
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It's pretty easy for me to tell spoken Japanese vs Korean. Japanese have a lot of ka, ta sounds. Korean have sounds that start with h- and ends in -m -n sounds. So even if I don't understand, if I can listen to a conversation for couple minutes, I can tell by these sounds.
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Old 01-04-2017, 11:45 PM
 
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Both languages are SOV with the verb conjugations/particles at the end. In their polite forms, you are bound to hear something that ends in -nida or -seyo in Korean, while a sentence that ends with -de****a, -ma****a, -desu or -masu (with final u sound often dropped) indicates that it's Japanese.
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Old 06-04-2017, 09:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldenTiger View Post
Both languages are SOV with the verb conjugations/particles at the end. In their polite forms, you are bound to hear something that ends in -nida or -seyo in Korean, while a sentence that ends with -de****a, -ma****a, -desu or -masu (with final u sound often dropped) indicates that it's Japanese.
What languages outside of Asia follow the SOV rule? Just a question out of my curiosity.
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Old 06-04-2017, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Taipei
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Japanese - desu desu desu
Korean - smida smida smida
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Old 06-05-2017, 10:36 AM
 
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If you watch a few shows with each you'll soon be able to see a big difference. I suggest going on a drama site like Dramafever, Viki, or even Netflix or Hulu and watch a few Japanese shows, then Korean shows. Also, you might add in a Chinese or Taiwanese show.

Then you'll be able to see there is quite a difference between them all. It's as different as English, Spanish and Portuguese. While we share some things, we are pretty different.

Then when you are out and here it, you can listen and figure out which one it is.
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Old 06-06-2017, 04:43 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OZpharmer View Post
What languages outside of Asia follow the SOV rule? Just a question out of my curiosity.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subjec...t%E2%80%93verb

"Languages that have SOV structure include Ainu, Akkadian, Amharic, Armenian, Assamese, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Basque, Bengali, Burmese, Burushaski, Dakota, Dogon languages, Elamite, Ancient Greek, Gujarati, Hajong, Hindi, Hittite, Hopi, Ijoid languages, Itelmen, Japanese, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Korean, Kurdish, Classical Latin, Lakota, Manchu, Mande languages, Marathi, Mongolian, Navajo, Nepali, Newari, Nivkh, Nobiin, Pāli, Pashto, Persian, Punjabi, Quechua, Senufo languages, Seri, Sicilian, Sindhi, Sinhalese and most other Indo-Iranian languages, Somali and virtually all other Cu****ic languages, Sumerian, Tibetan and nearly all other Tibeto-Burman languages, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu and all other Dravidian languages, Tigrinya, Turkic languages, Turkish, Urdu, almost all Uto-Aztecan languages, Uzbek, Welsh, Yukaghir, and virtually all Caucasian languages."
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