Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-13-2012, 11:58 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,606 posts, read 55,756,157 times
Reputation: 11862

Advertisements

It seems many Americans are quite clueless about the nations of Malaysia and Indonesia. From what I've heard quality Malay/Indonesian food is almost unheard of in the States, while it's often considered one of the best places in the WORLD for food. It's better known in Australia, but even here most only go to Bali, ignoring Indonesia's thousands of other islands. Malaysia is well visited but I think Thailand is a bit ahead. I honestly think Malaysia is more enjoyable to visit, has more intact nature, the people are friendlier and most speak English. It just seems odd that it's stature is not bigger. Bangkok and Singapore are considerably more well known to Americans than Kuala Lumpur and Jakarta.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-15-2012, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Macao
16,284 posts, read 42,954,513 times
Reputation: 10231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
It seems many Americans are quite clueless about the nations of Malaysia and Indonesia. From what I've heard quality Malay/Indonesian food is almost unheard of in the States, while it's often considered one of the best places in the WORLD for food. It's better known in Australia, but even here most only go to Bali, ignoring Indonesia's thousands of other islands. Malaysia is well visited but I think Thailand is a bit ahead. I honestly think Malaysia is more enjoyable to visit, has more intact nature, the people are friendlier and most speak English. It just seems odd that it's stature is not bigger. Bangkok and Singapore are considerably more well known to Americans than Kuala Lumpur and Jakarta.
There are just so few Indonesians/Malaysians in the U.S. as well. A large number of Vietnamese, Koreans, Chinese, Japanese, etc. But I can't think of any 'Malay Towns' or 'Indonesia Towns' anywhere in the U.S.

Also, I think more Americans are obsessed with the ideas of Buddhism and Japan/China/Vietnam/Korea as well....something more romantic and appealing in the American pysche. As Malaysia/Indonesia have so little representation, plus make up a Muslim majority, they are just 'under the radar'.

That being said, Obama spent a few years growing up in Indonesia, and his sister is half Indonesian. But, I don't think it really resonated or was of much interest to most Americans however.

Last edited by Tiger Beer; 07-15-2012 at 11:14 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2012, 10:51 PM
 
1,486 posts, read 2,374,609 times
Reputation: 943
The Dutch have a good idea of what Indonesia is all about but the rest of Europe really doesn't. Australians and New Zealanders seem to have the best grasp on these countries because they live close to them and deal with them on a much more regular basis than do Europeans.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2012, 11:15 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,606 posts, read 55,756,157 times
Reputation: 11862
Malaysian cuisine in particular is overall the best in Asia IMO, largely because of it's diversity. It combines influences from China, India and Malaysia itself, but is distinctly Malaysian. I can't think of anywhere else in Asia - except perhaps Singapore (where the cuisine is very similar), and Macau with the Macanese cuisine, and to an extent Vietnam, but nowhere to the same degree. Kuala Lumpur is a vibrant, modern city with some of the best shopping in Asia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2012, 01:22 AM
 
Location: Macao
16,284 posts, read 42,954,513 times
Reputation: 10231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Malaysian cuisine in particular is overall the best in Asia IMO, largely because of it's diversity. It combines influences from China, India and Malaysia itself, but is distinctly Malaysian. I can't think of anywhere else in Asia - except perhaps Singapore (where the cuisine is very similar), and Macau with the Macanese cuisine, and to an extent Vietnam, but nowhere to the same degree. Kuala Lumpur is a vibrant, modern city with some of the best shopping in Asia.
I think what makes food so great in Malaysia is you can quickly and easily find so many variations of Chinese and Indian food as well as Malay. Of Malaysian from the Malays themselves, I'm a huge fan of anything with peanut sauce. Lots of great sauces in Malaysia.

Actually I think the biggest hindrance or lack of interest in Malaysia/Indonesia is the fact that Islam is the dominant religion. It just repels people. It's unfortunate though.

Actually, I visited the countries many years ago, along with much of the rest of Southeast Asia, and something about seeing Islamic stuff everywhere, really put me off as well. I just always associated Buddhism with Pacific Asia, and didn't really feel like I was really IN Pacific Asia, if the country wasn't Buddhist.

That being said, these days I have a much stronger interest/respect for Malaysia/Indonesia. I love that the people speak English so well, and, I particularly like the strong multicultural elements of Malaysia, even though there does seem to be some differences that haven't been rectified yet.

Years ago, I assumed that if I were to ever make a move for Southeast Asia, it would be pretty much anywhere down there except Malaysia/Indonesia. Over the years, as I've gotten to know most of those countries so much more, I've found I'm the most comfortable in Malaysia with the English everywhere and all the different cuisines. I've become much less interested in the Cambodians/Thais/Vietnamese/Laotians, etc. Not that they aren't interesting, I just find the language barries to be so much greater, and I really enjoy having the least amount of barriers, if I can.

Regarding Malaysia and Indonesia. I gotta say I much prefer the mellowness of Malaysians. It's a very comfortable country to spend time in. Indonesians have some issues that need to be resolved - the treatment of Chinese, etc. I also noticed a lot of anti-Americanism in Indonesia. It's one of the few countries that the US seems to have so little involvement in, but Indonesia seems to associate anything Australian-based, as somehow American-based. The Bali Bombings in particular were probably an eye opener there, as sometimes I got the impression they assumed that all the white tourists in their country, were all Americans.

I just remember the first time I went to Indonesia, back in the late 1990s, and I'd hear weird stuff from time to time. One town, I heard someone was going from hostel to hostel warning any Americans in any of the hostels, to get out of their town right away. Just weird stuff like that. I think its been only recently that they've shifted that negativies moreso to Australia and backyard Australian politics, etc.

In short, I gotta say, Malaysia is actually the much more comfortable of the two to be in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2012, 01:40 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,606 posts, read 55,756,157 times
Reputation: 11862
Good points. I don't know if the whole Islam thing would have factored pre 9-11. I mean there is a radical element but Malaysia and Indonesia are nothing like the Middle East. You'll see mosques, head-scarves, hear the call to prayer, and it can be conservative in some areas, but again, nothing like the Middle East. There's relative religious freedom, alcohol flows freely, it's pretty modern and open.etc.

Yeah Malaysia is the most multicultural country in Asia. Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, China, Japan, Korea are far more homogeneous. Yeah nothing like a good satay, you haven't lived until you've tried a good fire-grilled satay with peanut sauce.

I think Malaysia would easily be the most livable, along with Singapore, compared to Vietnam.etc which still feel pretty foreign. It's also a lot more Western, globalized, and they're more used to ex-pats. The language thing makes a BIG difference when living in a place. Despite it's tourism only a minority of Thais can speak at the level of English that most Malaysians can. Many Malaysians don't speak super-fluently but enough to get by.

I've never actually visited Indonesia, not even Bali. For years after the Bali bombings the government was discouraging Aussies from visiting. Not sure if it's calmed down since then, but most Aussies don't venture away from Bali, which seems a pity, but Indonesia hasn't invested as much in tourism. If it did I'm sure it would be the no. 1 destination in SE Asia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2012, 08:18 AM
 
Location: World
4,204 posts, read 4,656,435 times
Reputation: 2840
there are less number of people of Malaysia and Indonesia in the United States. One reason may be that economy of these two countries is good and they do not go for mass immigration to western countries like some other asian countries like Phillipines, China, india, Vietnam do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2012, 10:09 AM
 
Location: Filipinas
1,760 posts, read 8,081,690 times
Reputation: 412
Quote:
Originally Posted by munna21977 View Post
there are less number of people of Malaysia and Indonesia in the United States. One reason may be that economy of these two countries is good and they do not go for mass immigration to western countries like some other asian countries like Phillipines, China, india, Vietnam do.
there are some Indonesian that work in middle east too where they can actually relate with the culture. I guess they go to the countries where they can mostly relate usually for a muslim indonesians.

I heard there's a lot of Indonesian of middle eastern ancestry.

Based from the music. It sounds like middle eastern to me

Last edited by pinai; 07-16-2012 at 10:39 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2012, 10:12 AM
 
16,433 posts, read 22,102,049 times
Reputation: 9622
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
It seems many Americans are quite clueless about the nations of Malaysia and Indonesia. From what I've heard quality Malay/Indonesian food is almost unheard of in the States, while it's often considered one of the best places in the WORLD for food. It's better known in Australia, but even here most only go to Bali, ignoring Indonesia's thousands of other islands. Malaysia is well visited but I think Thailand is a bit ahead. I honestly think Malaysia is more enjoyable to visit, has more intact nature, the people are friendlier and most speak English. It just seems odd that it's stature is not bigger. Bangkok and Singapore are considerably more well known to Americans than Kuala Lumpur and Jakarta.
One part could be that Americans are not eager to go to predominately Moslem countries.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-16-2012, 10:33 AM
 
5,463 posts, read 9,591,123 times
Reputation: 3555
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
I've become much less interested in the Cambodians/Thais/Vietnamese/Laotians, etc. Not that they aren't interesting, I just find the language barries to be so much greater, and I really enjoy having the least amount of barriers, if I can.
I don't know much about Malaysia, but most of the people I know who have been there have a favorable view about it, especially toward the south. The exception is in the northern part of the country where squabbles seem to continue along the Malay-Thai border.

I'm more familiar with Thailand. How is Thailand different than Malaysia in terms of language barriers? In the cities and areas where more foreigners can be found, language isn't a major issue in Thailand. It's when you head out to the villages, rural areas and areas that are pretty much away from the cities, where language can become a problem for those who don't understand the Thai language. Is it generally the same in Malaysia?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 06:35 AM.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top