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Old 09-14-2012, 04:45 PM
 
1,488 posts, read 2,341,323 times
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Japanese
Bengali
Malay
Korean
Mongolian

Funny thing about the sunsilk HAIR SHAMPOO commercial is that she wears her hair covered. LOL.
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Old 09-16-2012, 08:24 AM
 
Location: Hyrule
8,398 posts, read 9,884,444 times
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Korean is my favorite but I am partial. Second is probably Mandarin. I don't have a least favorite.
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Old 11-28-2013, 11:22 AM
 
490 posts, read 1,498,504 times
Reputation: 213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I used to think all Chinese languages were unpleasant but Mandarin can actually be kind of pleasing, especially compared to Cantonese.
I agree, I used to hate how it sounds but I grew to tolerate it as I studied more and more mandarin. I actually think it sounds nice. Also Japanese and Korean are among the softer sounding languages in Asia. I also really like Bahasa Malaysia and bahasa indonesia, hindi sounds kind of cool too.

Another one I really like hearing but is not in there is Chavacano hahaha. I think it's one of the coolest languages ever.
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Old 11-28-2013, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,231,639 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by joseanto071 View Post
I agree, I used to hate how it sounds but I grew to tolerate it as I studied more and more mandarin. I actually think it sounds nice. Also Japanese and Korean are among the softer sounding languages in Asia. I also really like Bahasa Malaysia and bahasa indonesia, hindi sounds kind of cool too.

Another one I really like hearing but is not in there is Chavacano hahaha. I think it's one of the coolest languages ever.
Yes they're not as harshly nasal as the southern Chinese and SEA languages. Isn't Chavacano from the New World?
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Old 11-28-2013, 02:21 PM
 
490 posts, read 1,498,504 times
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Chavacano is like some Spanish Creole, Spoken in Zamboanga City, in the southern Philippines.
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Old 11-28-2013, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,943 posts, read 36,144,182 times
Reputation: 9478
Quote:
Originally Posted by taydev View Post
Funny thing about the sunsilk HAIR SHAMPOO commercial is that she wears her hair covered. LOL.
Agreed! That's the first shampoo commerical I've ever seen focusing on a girl's face while hiding the hair.
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Old 03-14-2014, 07:10 AM
 
41 posts, read 41,549 times
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Malay
Indonesian
Japanese
Korean
Mandarin
Thai
Burmese
Bengali
Hindi
Cantonese
Vietnamese
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Old 03-14-2014, 11:22 AM
 
5,090 posts, read 8,064,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Thai is I believe 5 tones...
That's correct. Low, rising, mid, falling and high tones. Mid-tone is the point from which the other tones are sort of measured, so to speak. Sometimes, listening to Thai can almost be kind of musical. Some Thais can sound very nasally, while others are more clear (could just be more me hearing the difference though). The language can get a bit tricky depending on regional dialect. Central Thai (also called Bangkok Thai) is the official standard dialect, which is what I'm more accustomed to. However, in musical singing, the tones are not so apparent.

In the video below, you'll hear both speaking and singing. In the speaking, you can hear the voices go up and down. Those are the tones. In the singing though, the ups and downs are just the notes of the music, but it can be understood by the context.




Behind The Scene
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Old 03-14-2014, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
9,781 posts, read 16,231,639 times
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^ have to admit I'm not a fan of Thai at all. It's very nasally (especially when women speak it) and actually kind of harsh to my ears. Try being in an internet cafe with lots of screaming kids...I swear, haha. Thai, Vietnamese and Cantonese are my three least favourite of the major East Asian tongues.
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Old 03-14-2014, 11:35 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 8,997,592 times
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^Thai, Vietnamese, Khmer, and Lao all have that similar sound. I'm not really a fan either. Malay/Indonesian sound completely different and are very pleasing IMO
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