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Old 10-12-2012, 12:29 PM
 
Location: North Texas
24,000 posts, read 32,846,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtur88 View Post
Some languages require a double negative, such as Spanish. "No tengo nada" = "I don't have nothing." "Tengo nada" would be incorrect, and people could laugh at your comical grammatical errors, except that most people in the world are more courteous and considerate than Americans, and would not take so much pleasure in being insulting or demeaning.

LOL best laugh I've had all day.
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Old 10-12-2012, 01:46 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,273,499 times
Reputation: 7586
Quote:
Originally Posted by asubram3 View Post
The ones I have highlighted in red stem from archaic usage of the English language (as once used in England). After independence, India was pretty much isolated for decades, meaning that old-fashioned English is still taught in schools.

The ones I highlighted in green are from Indian languages. People who don't have English as their native language tend to use expressions originating in their own languages and translate them to English. The grammar structure of Indian languages is different to that of English.
What version of English were you speaking in the red highlighted part of the sentence?
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Old 10-12-2012, 02:04 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,273,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Geography Freak View Post
What about "laughable grammar errors" Americans make?

"I could care less"?

"Similar than"?

"Different than"?

"As good than"?
Exactly. Americans make enough stupid mistakes and should not laugh at people in other countries, for whom English is a second language after all.

I probably have seen a million times of:

A is different than B. (it is "from")
This is bigger then that. (extremely popular, should be "than")
There are less people today. ("fewer" as people are countable)

What troubles me more is the use of "lie" and "lay". They are different verbs. Lie is intransitive and its past tense is "lay"; Lay is transitive a verb and its past tense is "laid". I am not a native speaker and at some point I was so confused that I start the question the grammar I learned as so many Americans just mix up everything. For example, you can say "I lay the bag on the bed", or "I need to lie down". You can never say "I need to lay down" or "He laid in bed" as they make absolutely no sense.

Also, "nauseous" doesn't mean you are sick of something, rather it means you yourself make others sick. I means disgusting rather than "disgusted", as many seem to think. The correct word is nauseated.

Last of all, forum members often say this issue is "moot", when they actually mean "superfluous" or "redundant". "Moot" means "inconclusive, open to debate".

At least others have the excuse of speaking English as a second language.
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Old 10-13-2012, 02:57 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,448 posts, read 19,328,093 times
Reputation: 8510
I was watching Franklin & Bash and wondering if Indian English is simply thought to sound funny, regardless of any errors. The Indian guy in that program is funny, just like Raj on the Big Bang Theory. They just sound funny as soon as they speak
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Old 10-13-2012, 03:17 PM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
4,454 posts, read 3,760,246 times
Reputation: 9612
Default As do

Quote:
Originally Posted by joelaldo View Post
that's funny, filipinos say "Close the lights!"
Greeks...

Close the lights

Κλείστε τα φώτα
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Old 10-13-2012, 03:24 PM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
4,454 posts, read 3,760,246 times
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Default Absolutely

Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
Exactly. Americans make enough stupid mistakes and should not laugh at people in other countries, for whom English is a second language after all.

I probably have seen a million times of:

A is different than B. (it is "from")
This is bigger then that. (extremely popular, should be "than")
There are less people today. ("fewer" as people are countable)

What troubles me more is the use of "lie" and "lay". They are different verbs. Lie is intransitive and its past tense is "lay"; Lay is transitive a verb and its past tense is "laid". I am not a native speaker and at some point I was so confused that I start the question the grammar I learned as so many Americans just mix up everything. For example, you can say "I lay the bag on the bed", or "I need to lie down". You can never say "I need to lay down" or "He laid in bed" as they make absolutely no sense.

Also, "nauseous" doesn't mean you are sick of something, rather it means you yourself make others sick. I means disgusting rather than "disgusted", as many seem to think. The correct word is nauseated.

Last of all, forum members often say this issue is "moot", when they actually mean "superfluous" or "redundant". "Moot" means "inconclusive, open to debate".

At least others have the excuse of speaking English as a second language.

agree and thank you for speaking up concerning an unnecessary criticism of anyones English. Merely making an attempt to speak a language in which it is spoken differently by others does not qualify it for something to be ridiculed...come on now, aren't we adults?

Best regards, sincerely

HomeIsWhere...
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Old 10-13-2012, 04:31 PM
 
75 posts, read 142,329 times
Reputation: 163
Some of these are mistakes, and others aren't. "Needful" and "without fail" come from the British period. Others, such as the use of "revert" in place of "reply" are just plain wrong. Most schools in India still use textbooks to teach English that were left over from the colonial era, most famously Wren & Martin, which insists that foundress be used for a female founder and that the opposite of a bachelor is a spinster.
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Old 10-13-2012, 04:37 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,448 posts, read 19,328,093 times
Reputation: 8510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Suqraat View Post
Some of these are mistakes, and others aren't. "Needful" and "without fail" come from the British period. Others, such as the use of "revert" in place of "reply" are just plain wrong. Most schools in India still use textbooks to teach English that were left over from the colonial era, most famously Wren & Martin, which insists that foundress be used for a female founder and that the opposite of a bachelor is a spinster.
Foundress and spinster are also in the online dictionary I sometimes use

"Revert to" an e-mail or letter is also listed several times... I guess it means to deal with and reply to an e-mail after some delay, not sure, though.
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Old 10-13-2012, 04:41 PM
 
75 posts, read 142,329 times
Reputation: 163


Yes, foundress and spinster are genuine words, though they've long fallen out of everyday American speech. Indians also seem to do a lot of "beseeching."
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Old 10-13-2012, 04:45 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
21,448 posts, read 19,328,093 times
Reputation: 8510
Well, as long as you can communicate without an Indian <-> American dictionary

Are there similarities between oddities of Indian and African English? I mean, they both go back to colonial British English, so they might be somewhat similar...
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