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Old 10-29-2012, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Texas
632 posts, read 1,005,156 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by alpha_1976 View Post
^^^A Pakistani I see! I have a question for you, sir/ma'am. Don't Pakistanis do the same?
Oh yeah, most definitely. However, I have noticed Pakistanis tend to speak with less of an accent than Indians (as I have noticed watching both Indian and Pakistani news channels, interviews, etc etc)
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Old 10-31-2012, 12:42 AM
 
5 posts, read 5,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by branh0913 View Post
I work in the IT field, and I also work on a team of about 15 people, at least 8 of them are Indian. But Ive also worked for an Indian firm in which I was the only American on my team. I have found that many Indians have a different sort of english they speak. Sometimes it comes out pretty hilarious, but it seems to be a VERY common dialect amongst people in India. How this come about, as it appears that these errors are exclusive to India only. And many Indians have spoken English much of their lives, so why are these gramatical errors so acceptable amongst Indians. Here are some of them:



I have done the needful/Please do the neeful

The request is taking long time

One help please

The task, I have done.

Kindly revert back

Please do xyz without fail

Traffic will be very less today

Tell me. (This is common when you are about to ask Indians questions)


Does anyone know why it is like this? I have seen that this doesn't seem to happen in a lot of other former British colonies.

I am not trying to be Harsh but remember the thing that we Indians may got some Grammar mistakes but atleast we are able to speak in your language which you could easily understand but what about you guys can you speak in our language with us in the same way ?
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Old 11-20-2012, 03:30 PM
 
12,327 posts, read 18,433,096 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jeffpv View Post
I lived in India for a year. I love using "do the needful" in casual conversation here in the US...really throws people off :-D
Ahhh..."do the needful"...yes I've seen that in so many work emails from my Indian coworkers I am starting to use it myself.
And when you see them in person - the rotating circular headshake. Took me awhile to figure that one out.
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Old 11-30-2012, 05:37 PM
 
42 posts, read 99,885 times
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It's embarrassing when ignorant people like the OP make fun of something they don't understand. While "revert" is an example of genuinely bad English, "do the needful" is turn of phrase that was once common in Britain, but is no longer used anymore.

And someone said that when Indians say, "what is your good name?" they're trying too hard to sound sophisticated...well in my experience, they aren't. The people who talk like that were educated at the same kind of state schools that teach out of WWII-era language books. Believe it or not, "what is your good name?" was also used in Britain at one time, and the Indians who repeat it are just using the only English they were taught

I actually find their old-fashioned English awesome. "Please furnish me with the details", for example, is another Indian-ism. So Victorian. It's the kind of thing you should say while wearing a monocle.
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Old 01-04-2013, 04:03 PM
 
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Part of it is remnants of older English and parts simply adaptation of native phrases in English. English is not India's language so it has its warts. I would call it amusing but you chose to call it "laughable" as in you'd like others to join you in mocking.
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Old 01-04-2013, 04:06 PM
 
35 posts, read 65,405 times
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Not really. It has less to do with Pakistanis and more to do with the speakers native language. In general you will find that those that speak Punjabi, Urdu, Hindi tend to have less stronger accents than those that speak Southern Indian languages. Compare the accent of North Indian TV anchors with Pakistani speakers and you will find significant similarities.


Quote:
Originally Posted by RedRage View Post
Oh yeah, most definitely. However, I have noticed Pakistanis tend to speak with less of an accent than Indians (as I have noticed watching both Indian and Pakistani news channels, interviews, etc etc)
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