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Old 11-16-2012, 02:14 AM
 
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All three countries eat rice

 
Old 11-16-2012, 11:14 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by corsa71 View Post
All three countries eat rice
That's very true. It's an important staple grain. The most common is white rice (like Jasmine) which is often included with meals as a side dish, somewhat like westerners might include potatoes with a meal. Rice is also used as a base ingredient included with other ingredients, such as meats, veggies, spices, condiments, sauces and broth, etc. It can ground into powder (like wheat flour) to make noodles, or fermented to make rice whiskey.

And then there's Sticky Rice, which is sticky and holds together when cooked up and is usually eaten with the fingers by wadding a bit up iinto a ball and eaten along with bits of grilled or bbq'd meat (chicken, pork, beef), or can be used to make sweet snacks and desserts. Yum! Sticky rice is not a major export crop and often associated with rural (or farming) dishes, for folks on the go, but widely available throughout SE Asia.

Other rices, which tend to be more common to some of the rural areas, include black rice (looks weird, LOL) and red rice which seem to have more of a firmer nut-like texture.
 
Old 11-16-2012, 06:37 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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^ Speaking of potatoes, I was a bit surprised to learn that potato is actually a staple of many Chinese cuisines. Mostly northern and central China, though, which is why many Westerners do not know this. Recently potato has also found it's way into both Korean and Japanese. Of course since potato didn't leave the New World until the 16th century, it's pretty recent even in Europe. What's more, rice plays second fiddle to wheat and millet in northern China, where noodles, dumplings and various kinds of breads dominate. But since we're talking about SE Asia...indeed potato is found in some Malaysian dishes, like curry, not sure about Thai but according to my friend the Vietnamese are familiar with it too, perhaps the French influence. French fries are a common street-food, served along fresh spring rolls and banh mi, spicy pork baguette.
 
Old 11-16-2012, 08:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
^ Speaking of potatoes, I was a bit surprised to learn that potato is actually a staple of many Chinese cuisines. Mostly northern and central China, though, which is why many Westerners do not know this. Recently potato has also found it's way into both Korean and Japanese. Of course since potato didn't leave the New World until the 16th century, it's pretty recent even in Europe. What's more, rice plays second fiddle to wheat and millet in northern China, where noodles, dumplings and various kinds of breads dominate. But since we're talking about SE Asia...indeed potato is found in some Malaysian dishes, like curry, not sure about Thai but according to my friend the Vietnamese are familiar with it too, perhaps the French influence. French fries are a common street-food, served along fresh spring rolls and banh mi, spicy pork baguette.
There are Thai dishes that do include potatoes, such as gaeng garee gai (Yellow curry with chicken and potato). According to the World Potato Atlas - Thailand, the potato is thought to have been introduced in Thailand in the late-1800s, either from Burma (British colony) or from the Yunnan Province in China. While potatoes are grown and used in Thailand, it's still not as common as a main staple as rice is though. You can also find french fries in Thailand... at any McDonald's.

rachelcooksthai | Yellow Curry with Chicken and Potatoes | Gang Garee Gai |

https://research.cip.cgiar.org/confl...y/wpa/Thailand
 
Old 11-16-2012, 08:46 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,384,878 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
There are Thai dishes that do include potatoes, such as gaeng garee gai (Yellow curry with chicken and potato). According to the World Potato Atlas - Thailand, the potato is thought to have been introduced in Thailand in the late-1800s, either from Burma (British colony) or from the Yunnan Province in China. While potatoes are grown and used in Thailand, it's still not as common as a main staple as rice is though. You can also find french fries in Thailand... at any McDonald's.

rachelcooksthai | Yellow Curry with Chicken and Potatoes | Gang Garee Gai |

https://research.cip.cgiar.org/confl...y/wpa/Thailand
Wouldn't surprise me. I love Thai cuisine but I've only tried a handful of dishes. Thai food shares a lot of similarities with Malaysian. Malaysian chicken curry, as I mentioned, features potatoes. The Peranakans, a Sino-Malay ethnic group, in both southern Thailand and Malaysia actually had some western influence in their cuisine too I believe.
 
Old 12-01-2012, 01:50 PM
kyh
 
Location: Malaysia & Singapore
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Tiger View Post
I can't speak about Vietnam but have visited Thailand and Malaysia on multiple occasions.

Peope - I think the Thai are more frindly but I'm not sure if that's because of the fact they're more dependent on foreign currency being spent there. Malaysia has a stronger economy as their systems were set up by the Brits and Common Law and they also have oil. Malay is more diverse but the Muslim majority and the restrictions they have I think creates a separation and some interpersonal strains that are not there in Thailand. The common usage of English is a big plus there though. Overall advantage Thailand.

Safety - I felt very safe in both countries and both seem to have sufficient medical treatment. Thi is a draw imo.

Food - I really love Thai food but I thought the variety and quality of food in Malaysia was a little better. Slight advantage Malaysia.

Cost - boy both of these are great in cost. most sites seem to indicate Thailand is cheaper but the only thing that was demonstrably cheapaer that I noticed was alcohol (probably due to the Muslim majority tacing this sin). This is a close call but maybe slight advantage Thailand.

Climate - Malay is basically on the equator and is quite humid. |At least in the northern Thailand you get a bit of a break from the heat during the winter months. Advantage Thailand.

Overall advantage Thailand but Malaysia does offer a nice visa program that is more enticing than anything offered by Thaialnd.

p.s. - I'm thinking of retiring in 1 of these countries or possibly try them both for awhile.
Well I probably gather that 'Malay' is easier and faster to type than 'Malaysia' (I'm assuming you're contracting the word to save time), 'Malay' implies the main ethnic group in Malaysia (the Malay people) and their language. 'Malaysia/Malaysian' would be the terms to use when you're referring to the country or anything that relates to it, and it encompasses the Malaysian people (which consist of Malay, Chinese, Indian - the Big 3, and tens of indigenous minority tribes).
 
Old 12-01-2012, 01:56 PM
 
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Video of Thai women beating up some guy:

American Tourist Picks the Wrong Thai Girls to Solicit ... Gets Smacked Down - YouTube
 
Old 11-17-2013, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,945 posts, read 36,164,246 times
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Cities: I like all three, Saigon, Bangkok and Kuala Lumpur. Can't decide, all too different.


Culture: Thai culture is the most interesting.

Scenery: Tie between Malaysia and Vietnam. Thailand doesn't care for it's nature as much. It's very visible when you cross the Thai/Malay border and it's dead trees in Thailand, and vibrantly green in Malaysia.

Nature: Malaysia. They just take care of things better.

Beaches: Thailand.

Food: Thailand.

People: Tie between Thailand and Malaysia.

Entertainment: Thailand.

Ease of travel: Easy in all three. Thailand is probably easiest though. Huge tourist infrastructure, but that has spread out throughout all three countries.
 
Old 11-17-2013, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
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Thailand wins every category except "Nature" and "Ease of Travel", those go to Malaysia.
 
Old 11-17-2013, 07:48 PM
 
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Cities: Bangkok

Culture: Thailand

Scenery: Malaysia

Nature: Vietnam

Beaches: Thailand

Food: Malaysia

People: Thailand

Entertainment: Thailand

Ease of travel: Thailand and Malaysia seems pretty developed, Vietnam is nowhere near.
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