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Old 12-02-2012, 08:37 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Yes the Japanese influence is still strong there. Japanese restaurants are extremely common, and the Japanese built much of the infrastructure. In fact they developed Taiwan during phase 1 of it's industrialization. Taiwan's economic miracle of the late 20th century was also largely thanks to Japanese investment and know-how. The High-speed rail that zooms from Taipei to Kaoshiung in a mere 90 minutes (at 300 km/h) is reminiscent of the Shinkansen. Taiwan in many ways feels more like Japan than the PRC.
You can say the same thing about Korea. Japan ruled Korea, replacing their backward, repressed society under the yangban with a modern, industrialized one. Statistics of infant mortality, longevity, public health, education etc, show that there can be little doubt that a living standard in Korea improved far more under Japanese rule than it had under Choeson. I recommend you to read the book "Offspring of Empire: The Koch’ang Kims and the Colonial Origins of Korean Capitalism. 1876-1945″ by Carter J. Eckert. Offspring of Empire: The Koch'ang Kims and the Colonial Origins of Korean Capitalism, 1876-1945 (Korean Studies of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies): Carter J. Eckert: 9780295975337: Amazon.com: Books
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Old 12-02-2012, 08:41 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Originally Posted by Capsuleneo View Post
You can say the same thing about Korea. Japan ruled Korea, replacing their backward, repressed society under the yangban with a modern, industrialized one. Statistics of infant mortality, longevity, public health, education etc, show that there can be little doubt that a living standard in Korea improved far more under Japanese rule than it had under Choeson. I recommend you to read the book "Offspring of Empire: The Koch’ang Kims and the Colonial Origins of Korean Capitalism. 1876-1945″ by Carter J. Eckert. Offspring of Empire: The Koch'ang Kims and the Colonial Origins of Korean Capitalism, 1876-1945 (Korean Studies of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies): Carter J. Eckert: 9780295975337: Amazon.com: Books
Yes, it's a type of colonialism, same as Western colonialism. It's not always PC to acknowledge the positive impacts of colonialism. Africa has unburdened the yoke of colonial rule for 50 years now and it's still in a pretty poor situation. I know that in some cases racist colonial policy excaberated things, but it's not like the people had rosy lives under the often brutal pre-colonial rulers.
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Old 12-02-2012, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Capsuleneo View Post
You can say the same thing about Korea. Japan ruled Korea, replacing their backward, repressed society under the yangban with a modern, industrialized one. Statistics of infant mortality, longevity, public health, education etc, show that there can be little doubt that a living standard in Korea improved far more under Japanese rule than it had under Choeson. I recommend you to read the book "Offspring of Empire: The Koch’ang Kims and the Colonial Origins of Korean Capitalism. 1876-1945″ by Carter J. Eckert. Offspring of Empire: The Koch'ang Kims and the Colonial Origins of Korean Capitalism, 1876-1945 (Korean Studies of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies): Carter J. Eckert: 9780295975337: Amazon.com: Books
Most of the Japanese industrialization of Korea happened in the North, though. South Korea had 2/3s the population (at the time of the split) and almost all of the industry was in the North (although the arable land was concentrated in the south). Then, of course, the Korean War set back the South quite a bit. In the 1950s, Korea was one of the poorest countries in the world (income was around $100 a year per person).

Korea started following the Japan model and had three decades of near 10% growth (a feat only China has really accomplished). But it wasn't from the Japanese colonialism. It happened later.
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Old 12-03-2012, 07:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
Most of the Japanese industrialization of Korea happened in the North, though. South Korea had 2/3s the population (at the time of the split) and almost all of the industry was in the North (although the arable land was concentrated in the south). Then, of course, the Korean War set back the South quite a bit. In the 1950s, Korea was one of the poorest countries in the world (income was around $100 a year per person).

Korea started following the Japan model and had three decades of near 10% growth (a feat only China has really accomplished). But it wasn't from the Japanese colonialism. It happened later.
Treaty on Basic Relations between Japan and the Republic of Korea - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
South Korea's official documents have showed that under the treaty the Park Chung-hee administration agreed never to make further compensation demands against Japan, either at a government or individual level, after receiving US$800 million in grants and soft loans from Japan. Park, who was himself an elite product of the Japanese colonial system, did not hesitate to use the Japanese capital and money in abundance for economic development. As a result, Park was acclaimed for bringing about the so-called "Miracle on the Han River", South Korea's export-driven rapid economic growth.
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Old 12-03-2012, 09:00 AM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Yeah, but that was after de-colonization. The U.S. also gave a ton of money to South Korea to help development.
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Old 12-03-2012, 10:30 AM
 
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Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
Yeah, but that was after de-colonization. The U.S. also gave a ton of money to South Korea to help development.
The Seoul Station, the Bank of Choson, the Seoul City Hall, Seoul University etc, were built by Japan during the annexation.
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Old 12-03-2012, 06:43 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Yeah, but they hardly created a modern, industrial society in South Korea. It did modernize a bit under the Japanese, but the North benefited more. The educational "reforms" is what was most controversial, though.
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Old 12-03-2012, 08:06 PM
 
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I might get flamed for saying this but ...


China and South Korea would not have become the modern economic powerhouse they are today without Japan. If not for Japan's ODA assistance, China would probably still be in the process of recovering from her centuries of economic stagnation, let alone being one of the greatest economic powers in the world today.

South Korean technology were pretty much borrowed from the Japanese one which significantly contributed to its industries especially in automobile and mobile technology. Also, it was Japan that freed Korea from the status of a vassal state under China in 1895. If Korea remained under Chinese control, it would not have witnessed the exponential economic growth we see today.
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Old 12-04-2012, 07:14 AM
 
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Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
Yeah, but they hardly created a modern, industrial society in South Korea. It did modernize a bit under the Japanese, but the North benefited more. The educational "reforms" is what was most controversial, though.
Lets take a look at picutures of Seoul before and during the Japanese Administration.


Pics of Seoul, Circa 1880.






Seoul during the Japanese Administration




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Old 12-04-2012, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Shaw.
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Kono File ni Access suru kengen ga arimasen.

Seoul benefited more than the rest. But most of Korea was very poor when the Japanese left. Per-capita income was $100. It was a basket case economy. Maybe it wouldn't have been if communists hadn't taken over the north. Whatever industrial base there was was up there. But even then, it was still a pretty backwards economy (quite similar to China).
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