U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Closed Thread Start New Thread
 
Old 12-15-2012, 07:01 AM
 
723 posts, read 583,037 times
Reputation: 1522

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bideshi View Post
To my ear it would be Hindi/Urdu.
Urdu for me too- very soft and pleasant to hear language.

 
Old 12-18-2012, 02:04 AM
 
Location: Mount of Showing the Way
1,953 posts, read 2,068,651 times
Reputation: 615
Manchu & Tibetan & Uyghur
 
Old 12-18-2012, 03:03 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,344,192 times
Reputation: 11862
Quote:
Originally Posted by japanese001 View Post
Manchu & Tibetan & Uyghur
How familiar are you with Manchu? It's basically a 'dead language', just a handful of speakers left, so you can only base it on what you hear on the internet.
 
Old 06-17-2013, 01:54 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,845,380 times
Reputation: 796
Filipino and I am not saying this because I am a Filipino but because other Asian languages
sound a bit funny and very noisy, like they are always fighting. Also very nasal.
 
Old 06-17-2013, 10:09 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,113 posts, read 23,627,108 times
Reputation: 11606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
Filipino and I am not saying this because I am a Filipino but because other Asian languages
sound a bit funny and very noisy, like they are always fighting. Also very nasal.
It's probably because you are Filipino. If you grow up speaking and being a familiar with a language, you're going to be used to it and you're not likely to find it annoying. On the other hand, languages that sound different and especially if they are not some sort of prestige dialect or language will often sound chaotic and weird. I find some southeast asian languages somewhat strange to my ears because I didn't really grow up using or hearing those languages very often. I find tagalog sometimes doubly funny sounding because so much of it is speckled with English and Spanish words with, to my ears but certainly not to everyone's, a strange sing-song-y accent. I wouldn't at all pretend this is an objective value though--it's simply dependent on what one grows up with.
 
Old 06-17-2013, 10:15 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,113 posts, read 23,627,108 times
Reputation: 11606
Quote:
Originally Posted by japanese001 View Post
Manchu & Tibetan & Uyghur
Why Uyghur out of all the turkic languages? Seems odd to single that one out of so many, especially with so many dialects with arguably much richer histories behind them. Have you ever heard Uzbek before?
 
Old 06-17-2013, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,845,380 times
Reputation: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
It's probably because you are Filipino. If you grow up speaking and being a familiar with a language, you're going to be used to it and you're not likely to find it annoying. On the other hand, languages that sound different and especially if they are not some sort of prestige dialect or language will often sound chaotic and weird. I find some southeast asian languages somewhat strange to my ears because I didn't really grow up using or hearing those languages very often. I find tagalog sometimes doubly funny sounding because so much of it is speckled with English and Spanish words with, to my ears but certainly not to everyone's, a strange sing-song-y accent. I wouldn't at all pretend this is an objective value though--it's simply dependent on what one grows up with.
I didn't grow up hearing French but I love it so much.
We got used to American English in the Philippines but I very much prefer British English, love the accent and more uncommon words they use...somehow I agree because I prefer Spanish over Portuguese.

I actually hate when Filipinos speak the language using English words in the middle or in the beginning of the sentence. Sometimes we do not really have an equivalent word, but some times they still use an English word even if there is also a Filipino equivalent. Spanish on the other hand, just blends well with Filipino, it just sound so natural that younger Filipinos most of the time do not even know they are using Spanish words.

Last edited by Hermosaa; 06-17-2013 at 11:42 AM..
 
Old 06-17-2013, 04:50 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,113 posts, read 23,627,108 times
Reputation: 11606
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hermosaa View Post
I didn't grow up hearing French but I love it so much.
We got used to American English in the Philippines but I very much prefer British English, love the accent and more uncommon words they use...somehow I agree because I prefer Spanish over Portuguese.

I actually hate when Filipinos speak the language using English words in the middle or in the beginning of the sentence. Sometimes we do not really have an equivalent word, but some times they still use an English word even if there is also a Filipino equivalent. Spanish on the other hand, just blends well with Filipino, it just sound so natural that younger Filipinos most of the time do not even know they are using Spanish words.
Similar language families would make things more familiar as well as being part of the same sprachbund.

Last edited by OyCrumbler; 06-17-2013 at 05:02 PM..
 
Old 10-23-2013, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Boracay
41 posts, read 205,238 times
Reputation: 42
Have you guys heard of a Spanish based creole language in the Philippines? It's Chavacano, it's a mixture of Spanish and Malayo (Tagalog and Cebuano) and I really like the tone of the native Chavacano speakers. very soothing to the ears.

Here's a famous Chavacano song.

 
Old 10-23-2013, 10:19 PM
 
Location: Czech Republic
2,384 posts, read 5,845,380 times
Reputation: 796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierro View Post
Have you guys heard of a Spanish based creole language in the Philippines? It's Chavacano, it's a mixture of Spanish and Malayo (Tagalog and Cebuano) and I really like the tone of the native Chavacano speakers. very soothing to the ears.

Here's a famous Chavacano song.

I also like Chavacano ( I used to have neighbours who speak Chavacano back in the 90's ) and this song sounds good. They can promote this all around the country.
I wonder why Spanish was able to dominate their dialect in Zamboanga but not their religion although there are also many Catholics there of course.
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Closed Thread

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top