U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Can North Korea and South Korea merge?
Yes 35 62.50%
No 21 37.50%
Voters: 56. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-15-2012, 07:46 AM
 
208 posts, read 222,733 times
Reputation: 231

Advertisements

The truth is that many South Koreans don't want the two Koreas to be unified because they know that South Korea's economy will GO DOWN. North Korea is one of the world's poorest and least developed countries and South Korea will need to spend BILLIONS of money to rebuild the entire infrastructure of the North, and to mprove standard of living for the people of the North will cost tens of billions of dollars.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-20-2012, 02:05 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Pennsylvania / Dull Germany
2,214 posts, read 2,633,789 times
Reputation: 2090
Quote:
The truth is that many South Koreans don't want the two Koreas to be unified because they know that South Korea's economy will GO DOWN. North Korea is one of the world's poorest and least developed countries and South Korea will need to spend BILLIONS of money to rebuild the entire infrastructure of the North, and to mprove standard of living for the people of the North will cost tens of billions of dollars.
Probably true. However, the current situation is not acceptable. People in the north are suffering, and if there will ever be a chance to reunify (which I do not see in the next 10+ years), the South should not hesitate to do. I am from Germany, so I probably know what I am talking about... even the economic problems in DPRK are way larger and the costs will be enourmos, there is no cost to high for 20 million people to have acceptable living standards, in my opinion. South Korea should also consider a large share of the current military spending wouldn't be necessary and new markets could be discovered. Currently, the whole DPRK economy with ressources and labor is exploited by China.

Do you think the new president in South Korea will have an influence in the relationship between the North and the South? What could be acheived over the next years?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2012, 02:01 PM
 
Location: International Spacestation
54 posts, read 52,597 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by asubram3 View Post
Well, can they? East and West Germany were separated for over 40 years, and became quite different in terms of industrialization, prosperity, role of government in everyday life, personal freedom, etc. Yet they unified and in the past 20 years a lot of the differences have become diluted. In a generation the economic disparities would probably become negligible. Vietnam and Yemen too merged, although the differences between the two parts were smaller to begin with.

South and North Korea were very homogenous pre-Korean War, yet are leagues apart today. Can they ever successfully exit as a single country again?
I think they can, but are they officially different countries? They could be unified I think.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2012, 09:01 AM
 
208 posts, read 222,733 times
Reputation: 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Douglas Dakota View Post
Probably true. However, the current situation is not acceptable. People in the north are suffering, and if there will ever be a chance to reunify (which I do not see in the next 10+ years), the South should not hesitate to do. I am from Germany, so I probably know what I am talking about... even the economic problems in DPRK are way larger and the costs will be enourmos, there is no cost to high for 20 million people to have acceptable living standards, in my opinion. South Korea should also consider a large share of the current military spending wouldn't be necessary and new markets could be discovered. Currently, the whole DPRK economy with ressources and labor is exploited by China.

Do you think the new president in South Korea will have an influence in the relationship between the North and the South? What could be acheived over the next years?
South Korea don't care about people suffering in the North. The IMF collapse in about 1998 dramatically changed South Korean thinking on unification. Before, the vast majority wanted unification. But when the South Korean currency collapsed and the economy hit a serious slump and people started talking about a likely North Korea collapse due to increasing knowledge of the famine it had been suffering that killed a significant porition of the population - South Koreans saw that unification might actually happen at any moment and they changed their minds about unification.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2012, 10:01 AM
 
Location: North Texas
23,992 posts, read 32,833,608 times
Reputation: 27525
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fly!Metro View Post
I think they can, but are they officially different countries? They could be unified I think.
They could be, sure. Will they? I don't know...right now I'd say it's unlikely for the forseeable future. I think a more realistic dream would be for the regime in NK to collapse and for these people to have power, adequate food, adequate healthcare, etc. Baby steps.

Plus, I don't think South Korea wants to absorb a third-world country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2012, 10:17 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,149 posts, read 23,676,300 times
Reputation: 11625
Quote:
Originally Posted by Capsuleneo View Post
South Korea don't care about people suffering in the North. The IMF collapse in about 1998 dramatically changed South Korean thinking on unification. Before, the vast majority wanted unification. But when the South Korean currency collapsed and the economy hit a serious slump – and – people started talking about a likely North Korea collapse due to increasing knowledge of the famine it had been suffering that killed a significant porition of the population —- South Koreans saw that unification might actually happen at any moment – and they changed their minds about unification.
You mean they put in steps to actually have a real plan for what would happen once unification started, right? It basically helped kick off a dialogue about how things should occur because even the merger between the far less disparate East and West Germany brought a lot of economic stagnation for Germany as a whole. There were a lot of talks about how to deal with the economic shock and other issues and what kind of step by step process of slow unification would make things work. It led to discussion and finally policy implementations with action committees and the recent unification fund that's put out. I think this is a far more pragmatic way of doing things rather than just clamor for unification without a strong plan or a build-up of resources to smooth the possible (inevitable?) transition. Of course, this is a nation of 50 million people so there's a wide range of views on this, but I think the current course the government's taken on post-unification planning seems about right.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2012, 10:26 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,149 posts, read 23,676,300 times
Reputation: 11625
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
They could be, sure. Will they? I don't know...right now I'd say it's unlikely for the forseeable future. I think a more realistic dream would be for the regime in NK to collapse and for these people to have power, adequate food, adequate healthcare, etc. Baby steps.

Plus, I don't think South Korea wants to absorb a third-world country.
It's not so much a desire to absorb a third-world country as it is constantly fretting about an unstable renegade state rattling their sabers and.or pressing the wrong buttons. I think that's the primary concern. Secondary would probably be some kind of national pride or psychological heading family reunification stuff.

Also, there could be some economic benefit from a slow transition as it basically gives South Korea a possibility of extremely cheap labor right across the border and with people who speak the same language.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-21-2012, 10:28 AM
 
8,180 posts, read 11,290,067 times
Reputation: 2880
One of my S Korean relatives said that while people talk about unification the reality is that noone really wants it. She said that S Koreans view N Koreans as brainwashed and a potentially catastrophic drain on the Souths economy. If reunification ever happens it will be because of an absolute collapse of the N Korean government, not because of any real desire on the part of the South.
I also got the impression from her that there isn't too much empathy for the plight of the N Koreans - almost a 'they got what they asked for' type of vibe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-24-2012, 05:24 AM
 
16 posts, read 20,459 times
Reputation: 36
N Korea has guite an advanced technological base, which means that given the right conditions, it can pull itself out economically. International sanctions and international fractional reserve banking can't be helping its economy.

Re-unification with S Korea would mean the demolition of the N Korean government which they are not prepared to do.

This means N Korea will become economically more dependent & integrated with China.

Thus S Korea should be on good terms with China & N Korea where possible to enable the right conditions for re-unification.

N Korea is likely to take on low value manufacturing more & more as China sheds its own low value manufacturing. This is a well trodden route towards development. Meanwhile, the legacy of communist N Korea would be gradually shed much like the way China is doing, then the N & S can re-unify again.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-27-2013, 11:20 AM
 
Location: In the heights
22,149 posts, read 23,676,300 times
Reputation: 11625
Does anyone know if the current South Korean government has any particular stance on this issue?

Can unification actually be an economic boon for what would be the former South Korea? Are there are actually substantial technologies that North Korea has that South Korea has not already developed?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > World Forums > Asia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top