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View Poll Results: Can North Korea and South Korea merge?
Yes 35 62.50%
No 21 37.50%
Voters: 56. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 12-06-2012, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Well, can they? East and West Germany were separated for over 40 years, and became quite different in terms of industrialization, prosperity, role of government in everyday life, personal freedom, etc. Yet they unified and in the past 20 years a lot of the differences have become diluted. In a generation the economic disparities would probably become negligible. Vietnam and Yemen too merged, although the differences between the two parts were smaller to begin with.

South and North Korea were very homogenous pre-Korean War, yet are leagues apart today. Can they ever successfully exit as a single country again?
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Old 12-06-2012, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Shaw.
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This is a political question and a pretty speculative one, but I think we'll see a unified Korea in my lifetime.
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Old 12-06-2012, 12:42 PM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
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I visited Seoul many times and once, I took a tour of the North/South border area. There is a "unification train" which was built from the South and extends right up to the border area, where is stops (the North will continue building it once unification is started). The hope from the South is for unification, not sure what the thinking is on the North side.
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Old 12-06-2012, 06:01 PM
 
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North Korea needs to adopt reforms like China. While they do that, why not make an economic union between the two, like the euro zone, yet the two will remain economically autonomous? I heard that making Hong Kong autonomous for fifty years is intended so that China can catch up during that time so HK's economy will not tank. Maybe South Korea can annex the North as an autonomous protectorate.
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Old 12-06-2012, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Brisbane
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I beleive they will, they have being apart for almost 60 years now, its going to be a long drawn out process when it happens.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Saudi Arabia
376 posts, read 555,420 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asubram3 View Post
Well, can they? East and West Germany were separated for over 40 years, and became quite different in terms of industrialization, prosperity, role of government in everyday life, personal freedom, etc. Yet they unified and in the past 20 years a lot of the differences have become diluted. In a generation the economic disparities would probably become negligible. Vietnam and Yemen too merged, although the differences between the two parts were smaller to begin with.

South and North Korea were very homogenous pre-Korean War, yet are leagues apart today. Can they ever successfully exit as a single country again?
I worked in Seoul for 9 months that ended last December. When I went there, I thought there would be a strong unification sentiment there but actually, most of the young people are totally disinterested or don't want to unify with N. Korea from what I heard. So I think the longer they are separate, the less likely there will be a sentiment to unify as the older Koreans die off.
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Old 12-06-2012, 10:37 PM
 
Location: Shaw.
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That's probably true for the average Korean, but not true for the political leadership. Security reasons alone make reunion preferable. There are also refugee problems, which are a constant source of friction with China. But most of all, I just see the North Korean regime collapsing eventually (I know people have been saying that for about 20 years, but the difference is that I'm not saying it's imminent).
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Old 12-06-2012, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Saudi Arabia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pgm123 View Post
That's probably true for the average Korean, but not true for the political leadership. Security reasons alone make reunion preferable. There are also refugee problems, which are a constant source of friction with China. But most of all, I just see the North Korean regime collapsing eventually (I know people have been saying that for about 20 years, but the difference is that I'm not saying it's imminent).
2 good points you make are about security which I think is a good reason to unify and the collapse of the N. Korean regime. I'm not sure about the collapse of the N. Korean regime but if it does, then unification can be achieved possibly peacefully which of course if the most preferred outcome.

To integrate N. Korea into the S. Korean economy/machine would take a generation.
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Old 12-07-2012, 05:17 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tall Tiger View Post
I worked in Seoul for 9 months that ended last December. When I went there, I thought there would be a strong unification sentiment there but actually, most of the young people are totally disinterested or don't want to unify with N. Korea from what I heard. So I think the longer they are separate, the less likely there will be a sentiment to unify as the older Koreans die off.
As we all know, North Korea isn't the most desirable piece of real estate to annex, and the countrys infrastructure is, shall we say, a bit quaint and austere. It will no doubt cost the government tons to rebuild and integrate such a disadvantaged population into a democratic society.
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Old 12-07-2012, 06:31 AM
 
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I can see a big difference in comparing {N Korea, S Korea} with {China, HK}, or {N Vietnam, S Vietnam} or { E Germany, W Germany}.

China & HK separated by british conquest. They never fought each other in a civil war, and HK became China's export port & contact with the rest of the world. They had a mutually dependent attachment. Therefore, their re-unification was one about opportunity & allegiance.

NK & SK fought an enormous war which even today has not been declared over. Their leaders & society are miles & miles apart in ideology, social construct & economic development.

NV & SV did not separate for very long and their ideological differences weren't all that entrenched. Reunification had an advantage.

EG & WG separated by foreign occupation/dominance and not ideological differences, so their population longed for unification. So when it came, it was fairly straight forward.
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