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Old 12-27-2012, 08:50 AM
 
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From what I've experienced, people who were born into a religion are less aggressive in criticizing other religions rather than those who have just converted. I think your guide was born Catholic and growing up with Buddhist and Hindu friends, learned to respect those religions as well. Also, ever since the Second Vatican Council, there has been an effort to improve relations between Catholics and those of other religions, especially the Jews. There is also less emphasis on biblical literalism and compared to Protestant churches, little effort is done on purging syncretic elements.

Catholicism as practiced in the Philippines do contain syncretic elements, but Catholicism in other countries also do. The Philippines remains a very conservative country though and the Roman Catholic church is influential. Divorce is still not allowed and even mundane topics in the West such as birth control are still debated due to the opposition of the Catholic church. The Catholic church is losing members to various Evangelical movements though, but as Catholic churches are still overflowing on Sunday, there is no doubt the Catholic church will still have the largest number of adherents in the Philippines for many years to come.

With regards to the various Protestant denominations, they're not much different in the Philippines from that described above. In fact, there are ministry exchange programs between Philippines, Singapore, the USA and other countries. Some claim Catholics should convert or they cannot be saved, but to a lesser extent as they're Christians as well anyway. There are a lot of Filipino Chinese who are Protestants, and they do shun burning of incense, ancestor worship and other non-Christian traditions. In contrast, Filipino Chinese who are Catholics mostly still practice these traditions to the extent that burning joss sticks for the Virgin Mary and worshiping her like she's Guanyin is not unheard of.

 
Old 12-28-2012, 09:53 PM
 
Location: Earth
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Christians are arrogant and condescending throughout most of the world, I see no difference in their behavior in Asia.
I've seen first hand how they behave with hill tribes.
 
Old 12-29-2012, 06:11 AM
kyh
 
Location: Malaysia & Singapore
383 posts, read 1,063,629 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chielgirl View Post
Christians are arrogant and condescending throughout most of the world, I see no difference in their behavior in Asia.
I've seen first hand how they behave with hill tribes.
They are not alone. Most monotheist believers (Christians, Muslims, Jews) have this monopoly on truth, hence why they react that way.
 
Old 12-29-2012, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,783 posts, read 13,376,732 times
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When I lived on Treasure Island in San Francisco, a few townhouses had been rented by an organization that brought over Chinese Christians to train them to be missionaries. Well, one day, a very cute girl, who was one of the bustiest Asian women I'd ever seen, no less, sits next to me and starts talking to me, telling me she wanted to meet Americans to practice her English, and I seemed like a very nice man. $#@!$#@% HELL YES I AM!!!

She asks me if I like to read, and I say yes, of course. I ask her if she likes to read.
She says yes, and her favorite book is the bible!
:/
She asks me if I've read the bible, and I say I have.
She says that's wonderful and asks me if I am Christian.
I smile politely and tell her I am not.
She asks me if I have ever gone to church, and I explain to her that I was raised Christian, in a very devout household, and that's why I no longer belive in god.
She doesn't understand how it is that I could be raised Christian, and why that would make me not believe in god.
I told her that she'd find out someday for herself and asked her how she liked living in San Francisco.

It breaks my heart and repulses me to think of Christianity infiltrating Asian cultures. I hope it never manages to gain a major foothold over there.
 
Old 12-29-2012, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Earth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyh View Post
They are not alone. Most monotheist believers (Christians, Muslims, Jews) have this monopoly on truth, hence why they react that way.
Absolutely.
I've not seen Jews trying to convert with such underhanded and aggressive actions.
In fact, I've never seen Jews try to convert at all.

Go to any hilltribe village that's been "converted" to christianity, you'll see the kids greet you with their hands out because the christians bribe to get their numbers up.
They convert them, get their numbers up, and abandon them.
It's an evil little scheme they've got going here.
 
Old 12-29-2012, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,783 posts, read 13,376,732 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chielgirl View Post
Absolutely.
I've not seen Jews trying to convert with such underhanded and aggressive actions.
In fact, I've never seen Jews try to convert at all.
Proseltyzing is generally not a part of Judaism. There are a couple sects - the Chabad movement and Aish HaTorah, specifically - that do proseltyze to non-Jews, but even still, it's different from in Christianity. They'll never approach a non-interested party and ask them if they've considered becoming Jewish, however they will actively teach a non-Jew who's interested in becoming Jewish about the the religion, philosophy, and teaching. This is the opposite of traditional Jewish Orthodox and Hasidic sects, which tend to err on the side of a closed door when it comes to conversions.

As it was explained to me by a number of Jews (I was engaged to a Jewish girl earlier in my life and went through the conversion process to appease her and her family), in modern times, a major reason that there's somewhat of a cold shoulder to people who are interested in converting is because of modern Christianity and Islam, in which basically all one has to do is say "I am Christian" and that's that, you're Christian. This leads to many people who are poorly studied about their chosen religion, misconstrue many elements of it and even pervert it into something that has nothing to do with it, all in the name of God or Jesus - the hardcore American religious right who would seem to believe that Jesus would want to arm everyone, strip those not like them of their rights and all human dignity come to mind. Or, "Muslims" who are more driven by feudalist Sharia law than the actual teachings of Mohammed himself, who like Jesus, would generally have commanded their flock to err on the side of compassion and judiciousness as opposed to punitive arrogance.

Quote:
Go to any hilltribe village that's been "converted" to christianity, you'll see the kids greet you with their hands out because the christians bribe to get their numbers up.
They convert them, get their numbers up, and abandon them.
It's an evil little scheme they've got going here.
The way that Christianity is used by missionaries to supercede other cultures and traditions is amazingly offensive to me. I have a very strong personal reprehension to the notion of going into a villiage somewhere in Central America or Africa or Asia, telling people that the gods that they've followed for eons is heretic and evil and that by proxy so is their way of life and system of beliefs and morality, and bribing them into following with the "magic" of the modern world.

At the end of the day, I do believe in religious freedom and despite my extreme mistrust of Christianity, would never support it being banned or that its belivers should be subjugated. This, however, doesn't preclude me from hoping that it always remains smaller and less influential in Asian society, due in part to the fact that a large part of my affinity with Asia has to do with its influence by religions and thought that value pragmatism over absolution.
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