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Old 05-17-2016, 02:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
I don't understand how one could say that HK is "way too small" when London and NYC have just 1.2m or so more people.
NYC and London are many times bigger. There are well over 20 million in the NYC area, over 15 million in the London area, and maybe 8 million in HK.

HK is a very important city, but definitely a full tier below these cities.
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Old 05-17-2016, 07:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yueng-ling View Post
Hong Kong has never been on the same level as NYC or London. It's way too small. Its size cannot make top 10 in China now.

However, it did have a great influence in Asia.
HK only had influence over mainly the Chinese from the Mainland and South East Asia's Chinese diaspora to some extent.


Pre-Chinese handover, it was only really the British who had any glamour or power on the city state with a handful of rich and powerful ethnic Chinese. It was basically built and run by the British for the British, don't kid yourselves the local Chinese were at any levels important or influential. Most of the companies pre-China opening up to reform was mainly European/USA in origin who just had regional offices in Hong Kong.


It was a hub to Mainland China, still is, but decreasing in importance. I find Hong Kong well below the likes of NYC, London, Paris and Tokyo, heck possibly even Seoul these days.


My list would be:


1st Level: London, NYC.
2nd Level: Paris, Tokyo.


IMHO - the sheer size of China and it's population demands "three Hong Kongs" - one in the North (Possibly either Dalian or Qingdao), Central (Shanghai) and South (Hong Kong) and possibly one in the interior (Chongqing).
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Old 05-18-2016, 12:27 AM
 
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IMO, I think it should be NYC, Tokyo, Berlin and then London in that order. Paris should be in tier 2.


Germany has been the economic powerhouse of Europe, with good employment prospects.
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Old 05-18-2016, 01:28 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OZpharmer View Post
IMO, I think it should be NYC, Tokyo, Berlin and then London in that order. Paris should be in tier 2.


Germany has been the economic powerhouse of Europe, with good employment prospects.
London has a lot of history about it though and always known as the early economic powerhouse (post industrial revolution wise)..it's also very multicultural. That's what I think defines an alpha city, the ability to attract a range of different people to relocate there on a permanent basis. There are a lot of "rich" cities in the world, but it can't become prominent until it exerts some kind of "soft power".


Hong Kong and Tokyo lacks that power partially because Western lifestyles/culture dominates the world.
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Old 05-18-2016, 09:06 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
Well, Shanghai and Beijing are the only two mainland cities that come close to HK in terms of global prominence, and even those aren't anywhere near the "world city" that HK is. Chongqing has over 9 million people while HK has 7.1m, but, who would on earth would place Chongqing above HK?? It can't even touch cities with less than half its population like Paris (2.2m) or LA proper (3.8m).

I don't understand how one could say that HK is "way too small" when London and NYC have just 1.2m or so more people. HK is definitely still a global city, and I'm willing to bet that a lot of the people saying it isn't haven't actually been there, or were only there briefly and are letting a personal bias against it color their opinions.
You should know "city proper" population is meaningless. Otherwise, San Francisco has only 850k, smaller than Indianapolis. Is it the case though? We all know Paris is small in terms of city proper but it is obvious its power extends well beyond the 20 arrondissement. The Paris metro has 13 million people.


I don't know where you get the 1.2m for NYC... even Manhattan alone has 1.6 million residents. or did you think NYC = Manhattan?


Of course HK is a lot smaller than NYC or London. It is more comparable to cities like Chicago or Toronto than NYC/London.


HK is undoubted a global city, but it is rapidly losing its glamour (unlike NYC/London) because it is losing its advantage that makes it so powerful in the first place.
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Old 05-18-2016, 09:07 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willister View Post
London has a lot of history about it though and always known as the early economic powerhouse (post industrial revolution wise)..it's also very multicultural. That's what I think defines an alpha city, the ability to attract a range of different people to relocate there on a permanent basis. There are a lot of "rich" cities in the world, but it can't become prominent until it exerts some kind of "soft power".


Hong Kong and Tokyo lacks that power partially because Western lifestyles/culture dominates the world.
true but keep in mind Anglo culture =/= western culture, and anglosphere =/= world.
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Old 05-18-2016, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Guangzhou, China
9,779 posts, read 13,359,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by botticelli View Post
You should know "city proper" population is meaningless. Otherwise, San Francisco has only 850k, smaller than Indianapolis. Is it the case though? We all know Paris is small in terms of city proper but it is obvious its power extends well beyond the 20 arrondissement. The Paris metro has 13 million people.


I don't know where you get the 1.2m for NYC... even Manhattan alone has 1.6 million residents. or did you think NYC = Manhattan?


Of course HK is a lot smaller than NYC or London. It is more comparable to cities like Chicago or Toronto than NYC/London.


HK is undoubted a global city, but it is rapidly losing its glamour (unlike NYC/London) because it is losing its advantage that makes it so powerful in the first place.
Read more carefully. I said 1.2 million more people, as in more people than HK.
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Old 05-18-2016, 11:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 415_s2k View Post
Read more carefully. I said 1.2 million more people, as in more people than HK.
OK my bad, that comes back to the question, New York metro has 20 million - that's the real size because its economic influence goes much farther, while Hong Kong is just Hong Kong. Even the nearby Shenzhen is not integrated with it.


Cities in different countries have different meanings. In the US, cities are much smaller than Chinese ones in terms of administrative boundaries. NYC is pretty big and is only 1200 sq km. Shanghai covers 6300 sq km alone and Chongqing which was previous mentioned covers 82,000 sq km, half of California. In France cities tend to be even smaller, with Paris only 100sq km and Lyon 48 sq km, but those are not exactly small cities.
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Old 05-18-2016, 12:25 PM
 
1,089 posts, read 478,533 times
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Ranking cities is a complex matter -- there are many things that matter to a city but there could be no reliable data about it or it's difficult to measure it: history, landmarks, infrastructure, political importance, scenery, cuisine, environment ... It's even more difficult to give appropriate weights and index it as whole.
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Old 05-18-2016, 12:36 PM
 
10,847 posts, read 11,265,341 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by txjl123 View Post
Ranking cities is a complex matter -- there are many things that matter to a city but there could be no reliable data about it or it's difficult to measure it: history, landmarks, infrastructure, political importance, scenery, cuisine, environment ... It's even more difficult to give appropriate weights and index it as whole.
true but for HK vs. NYC/London it is not complex at all. I don't think it belongs to the same league as Tokyo either.


As to "diverse" or "international", let's not kid ourselves. Hong Kong may not be as homogenous as Tokyo, but it is not diverse. What's the black or latino population there? Right. Some white businessmen from the rich countries don't make a city "diverse".
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