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Old 01-28-2013, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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750 Nepali Rupees = $8. Wow, that'll break the bank!

Not a huge amount of money to see the temple square. Hopefully they are using the money to maintain and improve the buildings.
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Old 01-28-2013, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Macao
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Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
You aready can't walk through the Thamel area without hearing an Australian accent or German language or Japanese with cameras. Even over a decade ago when I was there it was spoiled by touts such that you couldn't walk ten feet without someone pestering you to sell tours, tiger balm, or mini chess sets. It is definetly not "undiscovered"...although I know some place in the Kathmandu valley that are (those I will keep secret).
That was my experience in Kathmandu in 1996 - the constant constant constant touts chasing me up and down every street trying to sell mini-chess sets, tiger balm, etc. One of the things that irritated me is every shirt you saw in Thailand (the tie-die ones and others that only tourists buy) were absolutely everywhere all over Kathmandu. 100s of those shops, and all the shopowners were so aggressive about selling them to you, just as you strolled the streets of Kathmandu.

That being said, tourists/travelers coming up from India, were telling me that Nepal was so much more peaceful with the touts. So, perhaps a matter of perspective. But they were certainly everywhere.

It was already well, well GONE from any idealistic point-of-view (and that was 1996 - I can't imagine in 2013). I've heard it's only gone significantly worse - more aggressiveness, and significantly more tourists and things that cater to them.

I heard there are go-go bars like there are in Thailand even now.
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:02 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
That was my experience in Kathmandu in 1996 - the constant constant constant touts chasing me up and down every street trying to sell mini-chess sets, tiger balm, etc. One of the things that irritated me is every shirt you saw in Thailand (the tie-die ones and others that only tourists buy) were absolutely everywhere all over Kathmandu. 100s of those shops, and all the shopowners were so aggressive about selling them to you, just as you strolled the streets of Kathmandu.

That being said, tourists/travelers coming up from India, were telling me that Nepal was so much more peaceful with the touts. So, perhaps a matter of perspective. But they were certainly everywhere.

It was already well, well GONE from any idealistic point-of-view (and that was 1996 - I can't imagine in 2013). I've heard it's only gone significantly worse - more aggressiveness, and significantly more tourists and things that cater to them.

I heard there are go-go bars like there are in Thailand even now.
I have my 2013 update posted above - touts seem to have decreased. Still around, but they weren't the constant harrasment to such a degree that it really ruined the experience as it was in 2000. I think also, with many of the tourist sites having to pay to enter (for Nepali's it is much less to pay, but still) it has decreased the touts bugging you. I didn't see any go-go bars. Some night clubs. Trust me we looked on a saturday night all around Thamel and the Kathmandu night scene is very subdued still, we visiting maybe 4 or 5 places. Not much action, and it ends early. We went to one outdoor nightclub/bar with a DJ, bunch of Nepali kids dancing around in place, and then just like that at 10PM the music stopped and the kids left peacefully. We were like "wtf". This is just the Thamel area however, I am guessing their are expat areas, or areas where the wealthy kids of Kathmandu hang out.

The temples, etc., are still well maintained. But unfortunetly the city itself it seems to be getting filthier, the roads are even in worse shape. We saw a dead cow in that river leading up to the monkey temple. And I swear their may have been not quite yet fully burned body parts near the ghat's at the large Shiva temple east of town. However, it being winter, their was no water flow to wash it all away.
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Old 01-31-2013, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Macao
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Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
I didn't see any go-go bars. Some night clubs. Trust me we looked on a saturday night all around Thamel and the Kathmandu night scene is very subdued still, we visiting maybe 4 or 5 places. Not much action, and it ends early. We went to one outdoor nightclub/bar with a DJ, bunch of Nepali kids dancing around in place, and then just like that at 10PM the music stopped and the kids left peacefully. We were like "wtf".
That's a good thing, that there aren't the thailand go-go bars.

I do wish they had a bit of nightlife to some degree though. That's what I remember, way back when, was all the restaurants/bars closed at 9pm, with just a stretching it to 10pm.
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Old 07-24-2013, 06:59 AM
 
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Default City for cultural life

Kathmandu is the City for the cultural life of Nepali people people. It has the most importance of the cultural heritage,religious heritage as well historical places. It is assume place which is situated 3000 feet above the sea level. It has moderate type of climate as well.
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Old 07-25-2013, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
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OMGosh. I didn't know the monarchy was gone. I must have been sleeping....this piques my interest and I am off to do some googling....lol.

One thing, besides age, that would prevent me from touring that area would be altitude sickness. I get sick going up on the mountain top in Albuquerque, the Sandia's, headache and nausea (?).

I would love to go to the Himalayas though.
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Old 07-25-2013, 12:43 PM
 
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Originally Posted by AnnieA View Post
OMGosh. I didn't know the monarchy was gone. I must have been sleeping....this piques my interest and I am off to do some googling....lol.

One thing, besides age, that would prevent me from touring that area would be altitude sickness. I get sick going up on the mountain top in Albuquerque, the Sandia's, headache and nausea (?).

I would love to go to the Himalayas though.
The valley of Kathmandu is not particularly of high altitude and no risk (probably the same or lower then Albequerque city), and in the real Himalayas outside the valley (you have to fly there, no roads go there) I was able to track the everest trail and get within about twenty miles of Everest (as the crow flies) without exceeding 8,000 feet or so which most people are able to handle without a problem (Junbesi area and a bit past it - and I saw some great views of Everest). Past that point, altitude sickness becomes a risk and you have to leave some time to adjust. One can fly into Lukla on the Everst Trail also, a bit closer, but at 9,000 ft. plus that is pushing it. People do have problems up there. Met some people on the trail walking back who had a partner that was medivaced out due to altitude sickness. The everest trail goes all the way to the base camp.

Last edited by Dd714; 07-25-2013 at 12:52 PM..
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Old 07-26-2013, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Native Floridian, USA
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Thx so much for that info, Dd714. I love the mountains, anywhere, but it is a real problem for me. Anytime I have been in ABQ, I suffered.....lol. I was recently in E. Tennessee on a fishing trip and had some headaches, even at that elevation (Blue Ridge Mtns).

I have become intrigued with the Himalayas in my old age. The area is beautiful to me.
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Old 07-26-2013, 10:42 AM
 
12,292 posts, read 18,413,572 times
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Originally Posted by AnnieA View Post
Thx so much for that info, Dd714. I love the mountains, anywhere, but it is a real problem for me. Anytime I have been in ABQ, I suffered.....lol. I was recently in E. Tennessee on a fishing trip and had some headaches, even at that elevation (Blue Ridge Mtns).

I have become intrigued with the Himalayas in my old age. The area is beautiful to me.
What most trekkers do, past Lukla, is take a day or 2 to acclimatize to the elevation before they move on. No strenous activity for a few days until they get used to it. It seems to help. Base camp is at 17k feet or so and then most of the trekkers turn around and hike back to Lukla, and the serious climbers go forward at that point. The death zone is at 24k ft or so, basically your body is dying, and the climbers go to the "oz" (suplemental oxygen). There have been some summits without the use of Oz, amazing.

But, some people do have problems even at lower altitudes. Seems you fall into that category. I think ALQ is at 5,300 feet, same with the higher elevations of the Blue Ridge. Kathmandu is at 4,600 ft. Sadly, Everest is not really visible from Kathmandu unless you go to the foothills outside of town. You get great views of the Himmalayas flying in however (if the day is clear).
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Old 10-18-2013, 12:14 AM
 
Location: Oxnard, CA
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I am headed to Kathmandu in March after leaving India. Any recommendations for places to stay and things to do? I will only be in Kathmandu for 4 days. Planning on taking the flight over Mount Everest.
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