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Old 03-09-2013, 09:01 AM
 
118 posts, read 279,540 times
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You had a sneaky Lola. LOL.

Sounds like I'd heard of Cendrillon (i live on the west coast, but grew up on the east cost - so if it was a good place, damn... I missed it).

So, you mentioned "paella." There's something about those vestige spanish names "in the Philippines" that seem to do damage in the culinary world. In other words, if you're going to have a Filipino restaurant with a broader patronage who knows nothing about Filipino food (somehow the word "cuisine" has always irked me - because "right now" it's kind of a street food almost - hasn't really earned a rep in culinaria, so somehow to call it cuisine is really a little funky. it's even more irksome when someone goes on a food show to show the world what filipino food is, and then they present a dish and highlight "hot dog" and call it "cuisine." do you see what I mean? it goes like this: "imelda, so here in Idaho there really aren't a lot of filipino food places, so locals here haven't necessarily been exposed to this type of food. can you give us a run down on what filipino food is?" then imelda answers: "well dare are a Meeks (Mix - hate that word without being explained in context) of Espaneeesh and Chinese and Hot Dog." Ugh!!! Hahaha. You hang on your seat hoping the presenter can class it up, explain it well, and show some beautifully done examples - - but NOOOO !!!!! They show something like spaghetti and hot dogs. UUUUUUUGGGGGGGH!!!

So, getting back to my initial explanation (I went off on a tangent): When Filipino restaurants call food items by their Spanish names (you mentioned "paella"), here is the result: professionals, the foodie consumers (who dine out and want to find great meals, unusual, different, and fantastic meals, and sometimes comfort food) will always compare it with their experience of the spanish version and expect it to be what they're used to. It's like setting up for failure from the start. I'm not a fan of Spanish names in any of the culture. That's my $ .02 - that's my humble opinion. I've even tried to read national Philippine literature (of the great Philippine authors). Nope. Whenever there were Spanish terms I kept thinking I was reading something set in Mexico. Why do I feel this way? Probably because Latinos / Hispanics / and Mexicans here in California are always in the news committing the most horrendous crimes, every 5 minutes a news story comes on and it's about a crime committed by a hernandez, martinez, ramirez, or gutierrez. I have been trained to think that hispanic means dangerous.

I live in the United States - and the only filipino food that can be easily gotten for me is in quick filipino food restaurants (if there isn't a party being attended). That food isn't always the greatest, but sometimes it's good fresh and hot (if you time it right, it hasn't been sitting under a heatlamp for ages). I'm all about Filipino food names in tagalog or other dialects - just ixnay the espanol (my $.02 - everyone's entitled to the opinion). I just don't think the Spanish did much for the culture - but they sure did fill their ships with a lot of natural resources, didn't they?
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Old 03-09-2013, 12:37 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,142 posts, read 23,668,851 times
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There's nothing wrong with a cuisine that has heavy roots in street foods since street food from all throughout Asia is oftentimes fantastic and much of the great culinary delights today stem from street food or peasant food of the past. Pho, banh mi, sushi, laksa, oyster omelettes, etc. all had their origins there and sometimes find them in top form there still. The odd part for me when I was in the Philippines (several weeks, in Manila for half, out in the countryside, smaller cities and beaches for the other) was the step down in street food as well--at least for me. Maybe I was going to the wrong places, but I didn't have a guide in other countries and still felt the overall uniqueness and quality didn't work so much for me. However, I did very much enjoy both the sinigang and the sisig. The dinugan, and I'm generally a fan of blood based stuff, didn't go over as well with me but I only tried that once. The different silogs were good and serviceable food at most places, but doesn't seem so unique to me. I also didn't get to chicken adobo for some reason while I was over there though I've had it in the states. I'll definitely be giving it another shot especially the kare-kare which sounds great.
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Old 03-09-2013, 01:36 PM
 
1,862 posts, read 3,004,304 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Susu Enrico View Post
Even though it's subjective, your rating doesn't make any sense.
How can you rate Laos and Indonesia that low and Thailand and Malaysia that high?
Easy: because I've lived in each of those countries. The quality and variety of ingredients in Thailand and Malaysia are vastly superior to Laos and Indonesia. The latter are 'poor cousins'. Or as I like to say, Lao food is poor man's Thai. And I realize I left out Cambodia on my list. I would put it right after Laos. I think the Khmer Rouge murdered all the decent chefs...
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Old 03-09-2013, 01:42 PM
 
118 posts, read 279,540 times
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Default Agreed. I appreciate street food -

Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
There's nothing wrong with a cuisine that has heavy roots in street foods since street food from all throughout Asia is oftentimes fantastic and much of the great culinary delights today stem from street food or peasant food of the past. Pho, banh mi, sushi, laksa, oyster omelettes, etc. all had their origins there and sometimes find them in top form there still. The odd part for me when I was in the Philippines (several weeks, in Manila for half, out in the countryside, smaller cities and beaches for the other) was the step down in street food as well--at least for me. Maybe I was going to the wrong places, but I didn't have a guide in other countries and still felt the overall uniqueness and quality didn't work so much for me. However, I did very much enjoy both the sinigang and the sisig. The dinugan, and I'm generally a fan of blood based stuff, didn't go over as well with me but I only tried that once. The different silogs were good and serviceable food at most places, but doesn't seem so unique to me. I also didn't get to chicken adobo for some reason while I was over there though I've had it in the states. I'll definitely be giving it another shot especially the kare-kare which sounds great.
I appreciate street food, and agree that some countries have the best food from the street vendors. However, what I meant was - that currently, in the minds of restaurant goers, the new modern chefs in the big cities (well, it's up to NYC because SF has been a big fail not including SSF and Daly City where there is a huge filipino population and a more than a few filipino restaurants, but these are not Modern culinary destinations . . . these are family restaurants and turo turos) are the ones presenting new twists on Filipino food to the rest of the world: white yuppies, indians, european immigrants, etc. - people who otherwise would never have had exposure to filipino food.

The young, modern, trendy chefs and bringing upscale twists to old Filipino favorites and they're doing great jobs: maharlika nyc (filipino moderno) and attic in san mateo, california - - good examples.
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Old 03-09-2013, 01:43 PM
 
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To put this another way: I remember when I was in university each Asian student association would put on a culture night. First there would be a performance followed by a dinner. Invariably, the Philippine culture night was the one where almost everyone would take off right after the show without hanging around for the food--even the Filipinos. This is a true story.
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Old 03-09-2013, 01:52 PM
 
118 posts, read 279,540 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stoutboy View Post
To put this another way: I remember when I was in university each Asian student association would put on a culture night. First there would be a performance followed by a dinner. Invariably, the Philippine culture night was the one where almost everyone would take off right after the show without hanging around for the food--even the Filipinos. This is a true story.

Well, I would otherwise be saddened by your story but when I was at University there is simply no way that I would want the responsibility to hang onto fried fish, pansit, egg rolls etc. when all I really wanted to do was party. Filipino food has a tendency to linger (odor-wise) and that's the last thing any college-age person wants when they go on a date.

A-N-D when you're at university, you're not cooking a lot. It's a lot of work and you need utensils and your main job is to be at school studying. So, . . . yeah. Hmmph. Haha.

I am really quite excited by the young Chefs in the big cities that are putting Filipino food on the map - and making it a "cuisine," which somehow always made me shrink hearing that word when someone was featured in a magazine or TV showing off spaghetti and hot dogs telling the world that this was the best representation of Philippine cuisine. I would always think to myself, "why, why..." and just have major resentment over such ignorance. What I'm saying is I'm quite proud and confident in the sophistication and style the new modern chefs are presenting the new Filipino food to my peers, non-filipino foodies.

The Philipines, a poor third world country, has a long way to go in kulinary innovation. . . the street food is sold by some very poor vendors - much of it isn't up to snuff.... I don't know what to say - - we missed the spice trade? Bare bones... yeah, but that still isn't any excuse 'cos they have some fantastic street food in other countries. (( Well, decent filipino comfort food can be had in Daly City (and it caters mainly to filipinos only) BUT - Maharlika NYC and Attic San Mateo CA have a yuppie professional crowd. I like their stuff -
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Old 03-09-2013, 10:52 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,142 posts, read 23,668,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ay Nako View Post
Well, I would otherwise be saddened by your story but when I was at University there is simply no way that I would want the responsibility to hang onto fried fish, pansit, egg rolls etc. when all I really wanted to do was party. Filipino food has a tendency to linger (odor-wise) and that's the last thing any college-age person wants when they go on a date.

A-N-D when you're at university, you're not cooking a lot. It's a lot of work and you need utensils and your main job is to be at school studying. So, . . . yeah. Hmmph. Haha.

I am really quite excited by the young Chefs in the big cities that are putting Filipino food on the map - and making it a "cuisine," which somehow always made me shrink hearing that word when someone was featured in a magazine or TV showing off spaghetti and hot dogs telling the world that this was the best representation of Philippine cuisine. I would always think to myself, "why, why..." and just have major resentment over such ignorance. What I'm saying is I'm quite proud and confident in the sophistication and style the new modern chefs are presenting the new Filipino food to my peers, non-filipino foodies.

The Philipines, a poor third world country, has a long way to go in kulinary innovation. . . the street food is sold by some very poor vendors - much of it isn't up to snuff.... I don't know what to say - - we missed the spice trade? Bare bones... yeah, but that still isn't any excuse 'cos they have some fantastic street food in other countries. (( Well, decent filipino comfort food can be had in Daly City (and it caters mainly to filipinos only) BUT - Maharlika NYC and Attic San Mateo CA have a yuppie professional crowd. I like their stuff -
There are definitely interesting stuff going in NYC in terms of fusion-y Filipino food--I've only gone to Umi Nom of the several that are out there and that was very good. I'm just surprised that the more traditional fare isn't generally better. As far as poor third world countries go though, I believe the Philippines is actually wealthier on average than Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia.
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Old 03-10-2013, 05:04 AM
kyh
 
Location: Malaysia & Singapore
383 posts, read 1,062,359 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stoutboy View Post
Easy: because I've lived in each of those countries. The quality and variety of ingredients in Thailand and Malaysia are vastly superior to Laos and Indonesia. The latter are 'poor cousins'. Or as I like to say, Lao food is poor man's Thai. And I realize I left out Cambodia on my list. I would put it right after Laos. I think the Khmer Rouge murdered all the decent chefs...
I actually thought Cambodian dishes were a delightful discovery on my last trip there. I found their curries very delicious - creamy and fragrant, and some local dishes like the amok (akin to the otak-otak of Malaysia/Singapore/Indonesia) that I tried was pretty good! (Gotta admit that I had these at a restaurant and not hawker stalls)

While Indonesian food is quite ok IMO (coming from Malaysia myself), it lacks the diversity (as in, non-Indonesian influences) and multicultural element in its food, and the sameness will get on you after a few days, unlike Malaysian/Singaporean cuisines which boast a wide array of distinctive Malay, Chinese, and Indian dishes yet retain a unique SE Asian touch.

Thai food is one of my personal faves and it's definitely one of the world's best cuisines, while I find Filipino food on the other hand kinda sloppy, messy, and darky with an overwhelming emphasis on pork dishes. I think it kinda unfathomable as the Philippines is supposed to have a rich culinary tradition with its rich native ingredients and spices on top of centuries of foreign cultural interactions (Chinese, Japanese, Malay, Arab, Indian) and Spanish domination.

Last edited by kyh; 03-10-2013 at 05:13 AM..
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Old 03-12-2013, 10:15 PM
 
9,334 posts, read 19,465,037 times
Reputation: 4442
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ay Nako View Post
You had a sneaky Lola. LOL.

Sounds like I'd heard of Cendrillon (i live on the west coast, but grew up on the east cost - so if it was a good place, damn... I missed it).

So, you mentioned "paella." There's something about those vestige spanish names "in the Philippines" that seem to do damage in the culinary world. In other words, if you're going to have a Filipino restaurant with a broader patronage who knows nothing about Filipino food (somehow the word "cuisine" has always irked me - because "right now" it's kind of a street food almost - hasn't really earned a rep in culinaria, so somehow to call it cuisine is really a little funky. it's even more irksome when someone goes on a food show to show the world what filipino food is, and then they present a dish and highlight "hot dog" and call it "cuisine." do you see what I mean? it goes like this: "imelda, so here in Idaho there really aren't a lot of filipino food places, so locals here haven't necessarily been exposed to this type of food. can you give us a run down on what filipino food is?" then imelda answers: "well dare are a Meeks (Mix - hate that word without being explained in context) of Espaneeesh and Chinese and Hot Dog." Ugh!!! Hahaha. You hang on your seat hoping the presenter can class it up, explain it well, and show some beautifully done examples - - but NOOOO !!!!! They show something like spaghetti and hot dogs. UUUUUUUGGGGGGGH!!!

So, getting back to my initial explanation (I went off on a tangent): When Filipino restaurants call food items by their Spanish names (you mentioned "paella"), here is the result: professionals, the foodie consumers (who dine out and want to find great meals, unusual, different, and fantastic meals, and sometimes comfort food) will always compare it with their experience of the spanish version and expect it to be what they're used to. It's like setting up for failure from the start. I'm not a fan of Spanish names in any of the culture. That's my $ .02 - that's my humble opinion. I've even tried to read national Philippine literature (of the great Philippine authors). Nope. Whenever there were Spanish terms I kept thinking I was reading something set in Mexico. Why do I feel this way? Probably because Latinos / Hispanics / and Mexicans here in California are always in the news committing the most horrendous crimes, every 5 minutes a news story comes on and it's about a crime committed by a hernandez, martinez, ramirez, or gutierrez. I have been trained to think that hispanic means dangerous.

I live in the United States - and the only filipino food that can be easily gotten for me is in quick filipino food restaurants (if there isn't a party being attended). That food isn't always the greatest, but sometimes it's good fresh and hot (if you time it right, it hasn't been sitting under a heatlamp for ages). I'm all about Filipino food names in tagalog or other dialects - just ixnay the espanol (my $.02 - everyone's entitled to the opinion). I just don't think the Spanish did much for the culture - but they sure did fill their ships with a lot of natural resources, didn't they?
Sorry I don't get your point. People can easily do research to realize the name may be the same but the application is different. Sorry your folks cook with shrimp paste, Lola forbade it and I've never wanted it, though oddly I like Vegemite which is nasty
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Old 03-12-2013, 10:38 PM
 
Location: In the heights
22,142 posts, read 23,668,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minibrings View Post
Sorry I don't get your point. People can easily do research to realize the name may be the same but the application is different. Sorry your folks cook with shrimp paste, Lola forbade it and I've never wanted it, though oddly I like Vegemite which is nasty
Fermented shrimp paste I did like. Great stuff especially when used in a stir-fry for water spinach. Give it a shot, yea?
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