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Old 03-01-2013, 07:01 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minibrings View Post
I was thinking the same thing. Both her parents had/have Philippine Citizenship (not Chinese) and are from the Philippines. So her parents are Filipino.

The Philippines changed their laws to allow dual nationality.. so she does qualify if she wants a Philippine passport.
Yes, I wonder if some don't consider the Chinese there 'real' Filipinos. I guess she's American now, but it's funny if she leap-frogs her Filipino heritage and just identifies as Chinese American. I don't really call myself 'Singaporean Australian' much, but it's still part of my heritage, more immediately so then calling myself Chinese Australian, although I do know many who just identify themselves that way. I just call myself Australian.

 
Old 03-01-2013, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Charlotte North Carolina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by minibrings View Post
Well both her parents were born and raised in the Philippines.
they werent born in the Philippines....AMy's mother moved there when she was 10
 
Old 03-01-2013, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Charlotte North Carolina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Yes, I wonder if some don't consider the Chinese there 'real' Filipinos. I guess she's American now, but it's funny if she leap-frogs her Filipino heritage and just identifies as Chinese American. I don't really call myself 'Singaporean Australian' much, but it's still part of my heritage, more immediately so then calling myself Chinese Australian, although I do know many who just identify themselves that way. I just call myself Australian.
she wouldnt be chinese-filipino if she was born and raised in America
it would be different if she was born in the USA, but is admixed with filipino...then she would be chinese-filipino

but given that her parents are both chinese....and she was born and raised in America...she would just be chinese-american
 
Old 03-01-2013, 08:42 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ejay1 View Post
she wouldnt be chinese-filipino if she was born and raised in America
it would be different if she was born in the USA, but is admixed with filipino...then she would be chinese-filipino

but given that her parents are both chinese....and she was born and raised in America...she would just be chinese-american
Filipino is a nationality, not an ethnicity, although there's overlap too. Ultimately even ethnicities such as Chinese and Greek are nationalities (their tribal ancestors were Sinified and Hellenized respectively). Since her parents are Filipino, she could identify as Chinese Filipino, Chinese American or Filipino American.
 
Old 03-01-2013, 09:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ejay1 View Post
she is chinese not filipino

she was born in chicago illinois
She was actually born down-state in Champaign IL. According to her bio she never lived in the Philippines until she entered the University of Santo Tomas. There is no mention of her residing in any country except the US until she graduated high school in California and went to the Philippines for college and that would have made her 18years old. So your statement that she is not Filipino but rather she is Chinese-American. So ethnically the is Chinese on both sides but culturally she is an American. Simply learning Chinese at home doesn't make one truly Chinese by culture. Although the Chinese born overseas have perhaps stonger ties to their ancestral country than do other peoples. You are, according to scholars on the subject, where you were born and rased until 6 to 8 years of age. So Amy Chua is more American than she is Chinese. I am sure she probably feels that way too.


I believe these scholars on the subject because of personal experience that has proved what they say. My children are Eurasian (the Asian side in Japanese) but they were born in Spain and lived there until the youngest was 10. They all speak Japanese well, they also speak English as they spent their 7 years in the US one is still here. They are totally aware of their Japanese heritage and very proud of it. They do not have one drop of Spanish blood, ethnically speaking, but they all consider themselves Spanish. So is it up to the individual or not? Even the Spanish mentioned it often that even though their parents were foreigners the children were born in Spain so they are Spanish. I feel fortunate that we chose a country with that midst. At that time they would have had a much more difficult time in Japan and later even here they faced problems they didn't have to face in Spain. I suppose that, unconciously, re-enforced their "Spanishness"'. So IMO, in the end, environment trumps both race and ethnicity. Following that logic if we take a child of 6months from Africa, put that child in the middle of China when he is twenty he will be Chinese even if he looks African. So if this is true then even Amy's mother is not culturally Chinese. She is Filipino of Chinese extraction. The only time this does not work is if the society ostracizes the child. Two paragraphs is hardly enough to explain the entire theory but it should get things started.

Oh, why did Amy choose tiger mom? That was very Chinese of her in one way. She was born in 1962.
 
Old 03-01-2013, 10:21 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,676,294 times
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Yeah a lot of people like to harp on about ancestry, but in reality your immediate environment is what matters most.
 
Old 03-01-2013, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Charlotte North Carolina
1,527 posts, read 2,341,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Filipino is a nationality, not an ethnicity, although there's overlap too. Ultimately even ethnicities such as Chinese and Greek are nationalities (their tribal ancestors were Sinified and Hellenized respectively). Since her parents are Filipino, she could identify as Chinese Filipino, Chinese American or Filipino American.
one could only identify as a filipino national if they are citizens of Philippines

what makes her any different from the numerous white americans who were born in clark air base???
 
Old 03-01-2013, 10:49 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,683 posts, read 45,676,294 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ejay1 View Post
one could only identify as a filipino national if they are citizens of Philippines

what makes her any different from the numerous white americans who were born in clark air base???
Aren't her parents Filipino's though? How long have they lived in the Phils? Or their ancestors? Many of those white americans were born to American-born parents.
 
Old 03-01-2013, 10:49 PM
 
Location: Charlotte North Carolina
1,527 posts, read 2,341,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom9 View Post
She was actually born down-state in Champaign IL. According to her bio she never lived in the Philippines until she entered the University of Santo Tomas. There is no mention of her residing in any country except the US until she graduated high school in California and went to the Philippines for college and that would have made her 18years old. So your statement that she is not Filipino but rather she is Chinese-American. So ethnically the is Chinese on both sides but culturally she is an American. Simply learning Chinese at home doesn't make one truly Chinese by culture. Although the Chinese born overseas have perhaps stonger ties to their ancestral country than do other peoples. You are, according to scholars on the subject, where you were born and rased until 6 to 8 years of age. So Amy Chua is more American than she is Chinese. I am sure she probably feels that way too.


I believe these scholars on the subject because of personal experience that has proved what they say. My children are Eurasian (the Asian side in Japanese) but they were born in Spain and lived there until the youngest was 10. They all speak Japanese well, they also speak English as they spent their 7 years in the US one is still here. They are totally aware of their Japanese heritage and very proud of it. They do not have one drop of Spanish blood, ethnically speaking, but they all consider themselves Spanish. So is it up to the individual or not? Even the Spanish mentioned it often that even though their parents were foreigners the children were born in Spain so they are Spanish. I feel fortunate that we chose a country with that midst. At that time they would have had a much more difficult time in Japan and later even here they faced problems they didn't have to face in Spain. I suppose that, unconciously, re-enforced their "Spanishness"'. So IMO, in the end, environment trumps both race and ethnicity. Following that logic if we take a child of 6months from Africa, put that child in the middle of China when he is twenty he will be Chinese even if he looks African. So if this is true then even Amy's mother is not culturally Chinese. She is Filipino of Chinese extraction. The only time this does not work is if the society ostracizes the child. Two paragraphs is hardly enough to explain the entire theory but it should get things started.

Oh, why did Amy choose tiger mom? That was very Chinese of her in one way. She was born in 1962.
Amy's mother moved to philippines when she was 10.....and eventually moved to America

even chinese-filipinos do not consider 1st generation chinese who came in the 40s and 60s as one of them...because many chinese-filipinos trace back their being in the Philippines since the 1800s

lets say a filipina marries a korean farmer....she moves to korea...her half korean kid ends up looking korean enough to blend in...her kid does not understand or speak any filipino language in a coherent manner..or doesnt speak any filipino langauge at all...grew up as korean cultured, speaking korean, etc
By filipino standards...that child would still be filipino based on the fact that his/her mother is filipino

this does not apply to Amy because neither of her parents are ethnically filipino
 
Old 03-01-2013, 10:51 PM
 
Location: Charlotte North Carolina
1,527 posts, read 2,341,349 times
Reputation: 129
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
Aren't her parents Filipino's though? How long have they lived in the Phils? Or their ancestors? Many of those white americans were born to American-born parents.

no they arent filipino...they have only been living in philippines for a couple of years...they are 1st generation chinese in phiippines
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